How many SIG/M disks where there? - CP/M

This is a discussion on How many SIG/M disks where there? - CP/M ; Hi, retroarchive has the SIG/M disks up to #310, but I seem to recall there were more. Does anyone know how many existed? And are they available online anywhere? Regards, Mike...

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Thread: How many SIG/M disks where there?

  1. How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hi,

    retroarchive has the SIG/M disks up to #310, but I seem to recall there
    were more. Does anyone know how many existed? And are they available
    online anywhere?

    Regards,
    Mike

  2. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello,

    Michael Hamer wrote in message ...
    >Hi,
    >
    >retroarchive has the SIG/M disks up to #310, but I seem to recall there
    >were more. Does anyone know how many existed? And are they available
    >online anywhere?


    http://www.acgnj.org/hist.html

    Halfway through to read, so there are more, though Simtel has the 310 too.

    Greetz, Katzy.



  3. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Feel free to give our webserver a good thrashing

    http://maben.homeip.net/static/S100/...oup/index.html

    310 is the last one I can see




  4. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Marcus Bennett!

    > Feel free to give our webserver a good thrashing


    I have, several times, looked, over the years, to your "majzel" Website. (By
    the way, what does mean "majzel"?)

    I have always been intrigued by it, since I don't remember ever hearing from
    you in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup (I have been reading it for 10 years, now),
    yet it is obvious (despite the fact that no other CP/M Web site has a link
    to you) that you have a pretty good collection of CP/M files. The only
    problem is that you don't have everything.

    From "browsing" your Web site, one gets the impression that it is a
    collection of files that you downloaded in a haphazard way, like SL5 that
    the others CP/M Web sites don't have. (By the way, if you have the SL5
    Distribution Disk...) I suggest that you get in touch with Piergiorgio
    Betti, who has the best actual CP/M Web site, and "synchronize" your files
    with him.

    Since I have been several times in England, and met several "Bennett", I am
    ready to bet that you are English. I am confirmed by the Google search
    telling me that you are looking for (English system) WordPlex 80-3. Where
    you a member of the CP/M User Group (UK), like me?

    Finally, I have tried to open your CV file, and the one of Agatha: both
    crashed on my system (Win 98SE).

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  5. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France schrieb:
    ....
    > Finally, I have tried to open your CV file, and the one of Agatha: both
    > crashed on my system (Win 98SE).
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    In the 21th century you are running Micro**** 98, and then the worst
    version (SE) ever, where even the vendor self regretted that it was
    released? How could that happen?? A computer system able to run this
    unbelievable pile of crap easily could run BSD UNIX or a Linux
    distribution! rexec format c: roche ;-)

    Udo Munk
    --
    The real fun is building it and then using it...

  6. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Udo!

    > In the 21th century you are running Micro**** 98, and then the worst
    > version (SE) ever, where even the vendor self regretted that it was
    > released? How could that happen?? A computer system able to run this
    > unbelievable pile of crap easily could run BSD UNIX or a Linux
    > distribution! rexec format c: roche ;-)


    How do you explain that all the cybercafes in my area use Windows? This is
    the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup. I arrived here after all the various small
    magazines (like "The Computer Journal") died one after another. As far as I
    know, this is the last place on Earth where CP/M stuff is discussed.

    Regarding Win 98SE, for me it is just a way to access the Internet. Find me
    the equivalent under CP/M (or even DR-DOS (by the way, why I am the only one
    to talk about DR-DOS? Isn't it a Digital Research OS? And where can one find
    DR-SBK and DR-WebSpyder?)), and I will drop without any problem Win 98SE.

    If I was using Linux, I would be the only one in the area. I am already the
    only one still using CP/M. By using Win 98SE, I can talk with the cybercafe
    managers, and can use any "IBM Clown" available right now. Like it or not,
    Windows is the universal OS, not Unix. Ten years ago, there was still a
    computer shop selling Macs. It is gone. Now, all that remains are "IBM
    Clowns" running Windows.

    By the way, I seem to remember that someone wrote:

    > The real fun is building it and then using it...


    so, where is a simple email program for CP/M?

    As I have already explained over and over, the Internet is based on the
    client/server idea, so I thought of using CP/NET Version 1.2 (since it is
    compatible with 16-bit DR Net) as a first step, so that a CP/M computer
    could run a Web browser running on a Linux box.

    As far as I know, my proposal of severals years ago as never been
    implemented.

    (I have been unable to connect to your telnet MP/M-II server ever since my
    first try.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  7. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    On 2008-07-20, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    > (or even DR-DOS (by the way, why I am the only one
    > to talk about DR-DOS? Isn't it a Digital Research OS? And where can one find
    > DR-SBK and DR-WebSpyder?))


    A) You aren't the only one talking about DR-DOS.
    B) Didn't you just hassle folks for talking about DOS a few message ago?
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgetnet.net

  8. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Roger!

    > A) You aren't the only one talking about DR-DOS.


    Really? I had not noticed.

    > B) Didn't you just hassle folks for talking about DOS a few message ago?


    1) to "hassle" is not in vocabulary...

    2) In my message, it was relevant, since I am a CP/M fan, so I am interested
    in how DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" (as far as I know, DR-DOS is dead)
    since DR-DOS runs on the same hardware than CP/M-86 Plus.

    3) How many persons have written a WS4-to-HTML File Converter? By the way,
    what have you done for CP/M, recently?

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France





  9. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France schrieb:
    > Hello, Udo!
    >
    >> In the 21th century you are running Micro**** 98, and then the worst
    >> version (SE) ever, where even the vendor self regretted that it was
    >> released? How could that happen?? A computer system able to run this
    >> unbelievable pile of crap easily could run BSD UNIX or a Linux
    >> distribution! rexec format c: roche ;-)

    >
    > How do you explain that all the cybercafes in my area use Windows? This is


    I don't know, I have been to very few Internet cafes my self and those
    either had all Apple equipment, not running Windows, or both.

    > the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup. I arrived here after all the various small
    > magazines (like "The Computer Journal") died one after another. As far as I
    > know, this is the last place on Earth where CP/M stuff is discussed.


    There is not much CP/M discussion here, you'll find much more stuff on
    web sites that offer informations, manuals and software for the old
    machines.

    > Regarding Win 98SE, for me it is just a way to access the Internet. Find me
    > the equivalent under CP/M (or even DR-DOS (by the way, why I am the only one
    > to talk about DR-DOS? Isn't it a Digital Research OS? And where can one find
    > DR-SBK and DR-WebSpyder?)), and I will drop without any problem Win 98SE.


    If you want to use CP/M to access the Internet then you need to
    implement appropriate software for this, asking me to find such software
    for you is not an option.
    Yes you are the only one to talk about DR-DOS. I have installed it on a
    virtual machine, but there is not much to talk about, it's just for
    playing some old games. Trivial technology long gone, what to talk about?

    > If I was using Linux, I would be the only one in the area. I am already the
    > only one still using CP/M. By using Win 98SE, I can talk with the cybercafe
    > managers, and can use any "IBM Clown" available right now. Like it or not,
    > Windows is the universal OS, not Unix. Ten years ago, there was still a
    > computer shop selling Macs. It is gone. Now, all that remains are "IBM
    > Clowns" running Windows.


    Excuse me, but at work I use real big Sun, IBM, HP servers all running
    UNIX, even smaller x86-64 bit systems are running UNIX. This huge
    database machines can't be replaced with half broken Windows Software on
    tiny hardware. That 'universal' Windows OS can't even be used on a small
    client system for serious work. This stuff might be good for usage at
    home as entertainment, but that's far from an universal OS. Have a look
    at Linux, runs on small cell phones up to the biggest IBM mainframe.
    Looks like it is an universal OS usable for everything.

    > By the way, I seem to remember that someone wrote:
    >
    >> The real fun is building it and then using it...

    >
    > so, where is a simple email program for CP/M?


    That saying means that I enjoy building stuff for my self to use it.
    Reading my email on a CP/M system isn't in that category. I don't mind
    if others want to use things I have build too, fine with me. If you want
    me to build your stuff then you are supposed to pay me for that.

    > As I have already explained over and over, the Internet is based on the
    > client/server idea, so I thought of using CP/NET Version 1.2 (since it is
    > compatible with 16-bit DR Net) as a first step, so that a CP/M computer
    > could run a Web browser running on a Linux box.


    CP/NET is a very simple point to point protocol for remote procedure
    calls to share some resources like disks and printers. With that you
    won't go anywhere far. Internet uses TCP/IP protocol, something very
    different. Instead of trying to explaining the Internet to me get your
    self busy understanding the protocols. Then you can write software using it.

    > (I have been unable to connect to your telnet MP/M-II server ever since my
    > first try.)


    Yep, because the 2 lines where used permanently. Looks like I have to
    implement a timeout that kicks people out, still the same as with the
    BBS's in the 80th. People connect to systems and then go away for hours
    without using them. Ah well, is just a test machine to try out bits and
    stuff, but should be improved if anyone wants to run an ancient BBS over
    the Internet.

    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    Udo Munk
    --
    The real fun is building it and then using it...

  10. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    *Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France* wrote on Sun, 08-07-20 09:51:
    >1) to "hassle" is not in vocabulary...


    Not in my very compact English-French one, agreed.
    But the full Collins has this:

    +---------------------------Collins English Dictionary ---------------+
    Dictionary Thesaurus Search History Options Quit F1-Help
    hassle ('hæs°l) Informal. n.
    1. a prolonged argument; wrangle.
    2. a great deal of trouble; difficulty; nuisance.
    vb.
    3. (intr. ) to quarrel or wrangle.
    4. (tr. ) to cause annoyance or trouble to (someone); harass.
    [C20: of unknown origin]

    F2-Dict F3-Thes F4-Copy F5-Paste F6-Prev F7-Next
    +---------------------------------------------------------------------+

    >so I am interested in how DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" (as far as
    >I know, DR-DOS is dead)


    Not any more so than CP/M. For the Net there is the Nettamer for DOS.
    Tried it, works.

    >How many persons have written a WS4-to-HTML File Converter?


    No need to brag about trivialities. I convert text to raw HTML through
    self-written scripts all the time in preparation for my site. Not WS4
    yet, but I wouldn't expect any special problems there.


  11. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Udo!

    > There is not much CP/M discussion here


    ??? Strange, I was thinking that this is the comp.os.CPM Newsgroup!...

    > If you want to use CP/M to access the Internet then you need to
    > implement appropriate software for this


    This is, indeed, one of my programming projects since, years after years, if
    I don't do something, nobody else do anything.

    > Excuse me, but at work I use real big servers all running Unix


    So what? Don't you know that I was a COBOL programmer on IBM Mainframes? The
    computing world is divided in several "worlds". There is/was the IBM
    Mainframes, the DEC VAXes, then the IBM PC. Unix was only used inside
    American Universities. One of my friend was a total FORTRAN fanatic. Have
    you any idea of how many Mega/Giga/Tera Bytes of FORTRAN code exist? (and
    COBOL?) You would be astonished. And they are not half-cooked code made by
    students in American Universities...

    Today, everything is mixed because of "upward mobility". At the origin, the
    IBM Clown was a 16-bit system (since there was nothing, Bill Gates copied
    the universal 8-bit OS: CP/M), then became a 32-bit system. When Xenix
    failed to attract the masses, Bill Gates noticed that the Mac had fanatic
    users. So, he made Windows. After that, when people started using the
    Internet, Internet-compatibility became the goal. Before, it was simple
    because each use had its own computer hardware.

    > (...) This stuff might be good for usage at
    > home as entertainment, but that's far from an universal OS.


    Also, there is the problem that there is several kinds of OSes. As my
    experience demonstrates, you can be perfectly happy with a 4-MHz Z-80
    running a single-user OS like CP/M Plus during 15 years. Multi-tasking OSes
    are, inherently, more difficult to use. No wonder that the market uses, by a
    huge percentage, Windows rather than Linux. There are also real-time OSes,
    but they are needed only in special cases. That's why they are so little
    known.

    > Have a look
    > at Linux, runs on small cell phones up to the biggest IBM mainframe.
    > Looks like it is an universal OS usable for everything.


    How many Linux work on a 4-MHz Z-80 with 64KB of RAM?

    > Reading my email on a CP/M system isn't in that category.


    Too bad for us.

    > (...) If you want
    > me to build your stuff then you are supposed to pay me for that.


    Hahaha! Me, I have (according to Google) made more than 20 BASIC programs
    that made something useful under CP/M, during the last 10 years. All that
    for free, with a text explaining in depth why the program was made. I am a
    programmer, not a carpet dealer.

    > CP/NET is a very simple point to point protocol for remote procedure
    > calls to share some resources like disks and printers. With that you
    > won't go anywhere far. Internet uses TCP/IP protocol, something very
    > different. Instead of trying to explaining the Internet to me get your
    > self busy understanding the protocols. Then you can write software using

    it.

    Don't worry, I will do it, in times. Haven't you noticed that I do things
    step-by-step?
    That's why I mentioned CP/NET version 1.2. 1) I hoped that its mention would
    revive its use for CP/M 2.2 systems, 2) CP/NET is not tied to any particular
    protocol: it could run just as well with TCP/IP, 3) I was thinking, of
    course, that it would be a good first step to do before going farther.

    Meanwhile, since I am a fan of MP/M-II (I deeply regret not to have a
    MP/M-II system. I am really sorry that Bruce Jones disappeared.), I hope to
    be able to play again on your MP/M-II system. In particular, I would like to
    try CP/NET, to see how you implemented it. Hector Peraza wrote a CP/NET
    server for Linux. Here is what he wrote:

    This is a program you can use on your Linux machine to communicate with a
    single CP/M requester connected to a PC serial port. It uses the RS232
    protocol described in Appendix E of the CP/NET documentation.

    The program emulates either version 1.1 or 1.2 of CP/NET, and therefore must
    be used with a requester running the same CP/NET version. It should be noted
    that CP/NET versions 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 are not compatible with each other
    (1.2 is not even backwards compatible with 1.1). Although they use the same
    physical-layer protocol over a serial line, they differ at the network-layer
    level.

    I have included the package working SNIOS modules for the P112 CPU board,
    for both CP/NET 1.1 and 1.2 versions. The SNIOS uses the second serial port
    of the P112 at 38400 baud.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  12. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    On 2008-07-20, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    >> A) You aren't the only one talking about DR-DOS.

    >
    > Really? I had not noticed.


    Ah. Perhaps you don't recall that your recent investigation of the
    DR-DOS system builder kit was *in response to* a comment by someone
    else.

    >> B) Didn't you just hassle folks for talking about DOS a few message ago?

    >
    > 1) to "hassle" is not in vocabulary...


    Perhaps you don't recall typing this:

    >>>> ??? This is the comp.os.CPM Newsgroup, not MeSs-DOS...


    Fact is, that this is comp.os.cpm and DR-DOS is not a CP/M. You won't be
    able to use the DR-DOS BIOS to understand CP/M-86 Plus because it is a
    DOS BIOS, not a CP/M BIOS.

    > 2) In my message, it was relevant, since I am a CP/M fan, so I am interested
    > in how DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" (as far as I know, DR-DOS is dead)
    > since DR-DOS runs on the same hardware than CP/M-86 Plus.


    The way DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" is not relevant to CP/M. If
    you want to discuss that sort of thing, you might try comp.os.msdos.

    Nevertheless, you might look at http://www.arachne.cz/index.php?clanekid=176
    which talks about the Arachne browser. This was picked up by Caldera to
    become whatever spider-related name they gave it.

    You might be better off looking at the KA9Q stuff. I once heard rumors
    that there was a CP/M port, but never tracked it down.

    > 3) How many persons have written a WS4-to-HTML File Converter?


    I have done both WS4-to-HTML and WS4-to-RTF; I even used the latter to
    develop Windows help files. Since WS4 is no longer my primary editor, that
    sort of thing is no longer useful to me.

    > By the way,
    > what have you done for CP/M, recently?


    Bite me.

    Also, in answer to another of your questions (about Linux running on a
    64K Z80), try this: http://www.cpmclub.de/zeitung/seite5.htm It's not
    Linux, but is Unix.
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  13. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Roger!

    I am just commenting some things that you wrote. I have no intention of
    starting a flame. I got a private message from Marcus Bennett, and this
    thread seems destined to be dying.

    > Fact is, that this is comp.os.cpm and DR-DOS is not a CP/M. You won't be
    > able to use the DR-DOS BIOS to understand CP/M-86 Plus because it is a
    > DOS BIOS, not a CP/M BIOS.


    Here, I am of a completely different opinion, since I disassembled the BIOS
    of CP/M-86 Plus... and it is the same as the BIOS of DOS Plus (which has
    just an additional module (whose name I don't remember, right now) providing
    all MS-DOS Version 2 system calls to EXE files).

    > > 2) In my message, it was relevant, since I am a CP/M fan, so I am

    interested
    > > in how DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" (as far as I know, DR-DOS is

    dead)
    > > since DR-DOS runs on the same hardware than CP/M-86 Plus.

    >
    > The way DR-DOS used to "surf the Internet" is not relevant to CP/M. If
    > you want to discuss that sort of thing, you might try comp.os.msdos.


    I think that it is relevant, because I have seen several Internet browsers
    fitting on a single 1.44MB 3.5" floppy. So, if it was possible with MS-DOS,
    I simply don't see why it would not be possible with CP/M-86 Plus (which has
    4 background tasks available for I/O transfers) or, even better, Concurrent
    CP/M (which was on par with any Unix implementation that had been done when
    it was done (1983)).

    > Nevertheless, you might look at

    http://www.arachne.cz/index.php?clanekid=176
    > which talks about the Arachne browser. This was picked up by Caldera to
    > become whatever spider-related name they gave it.


    Several years ago, I had tried Arachne under DR-DOS 7.03, but was not
    impressed with it.

    > You might be better off looking at the KA9Q stuff. I once heard rumors
    > that there was a CP/M port, but never tracked it down.


    Yes, indeed, this could be interesting.

    > > 3) How many persons have written a WS4-to-HTML File Converter?

    >
    > I have done both WS4-to-HTML and WS4-to-RTF; I even used the latter to
    > develop Windows help files. Since WS4 is no longer my primary editor, that
    > sort of thing is no longer useful to me.


    I note that you never (during the 10 years that I have read the comp.os.cpm
    Newsgroup) ever mentioned those programs, or provided them. What is the
    purpose of a program if you are the only one to use it? Have you needs so
    special that nobody else could be interested in the tool that you built? Me,
    when I feel the need for a program, I write it and explain it so that
    everybody can use it. I don't think that I am special. If I feel a need for
    an utility, that means that anybody else using the same system will feel the
    same need. I am a programmer: I am interested in how to solve some needs
    using programming languages. In my experience, there is always something
    that I don't foresee, and that someone else spot instantly. That's another
    reason why it is better to publish programs, so they can be improved (for
    free!). The IBM Clown, with the so-called "ShareWare" killed this spirit,
    that is found in all the volumes of the CP/M Software Library. Linux is also
    incredibly commercial. And the Mac is the most expensive system.

    > Also, in answer to another of your questions (about Linux running on a
    > 64K Z80), try this: http://www.cpmclub.de/zeitung/seite5.htm It's not
    > Linux, but is Unix.


    In my humble opinion, MP/M-II is much more impressive than UZI (which is not
    really Unix Version 7 compatible). Anyway, you are comparing Apples with
    Oranges, since MP/M-II is totally COMPATIBLE with any program written for
    CP/M, while Unix is totally INCOMPATIBLE with any program written for
    another Disk Operating System, since there is no single-user single-task
    version of Unix...

    (You will also note that Unix never got the portability of CP/M COMmand
    files, able to run under any implementation of CP/M -- claimed to have been
    more than 3,000 different hardware... Find one single Unix program that has
    been as portable since Unix exists! I am always amazed, when I read the
    source code of CP/M utilities written in PL/M, to see the number of versions
    of CP/M under which they ran, without change. C is several orders of
    magnitude below this technical performance. I could not believe my eyes when
    I saw that Intel was dropping PL/M. They really don't understand software.)

    This will be all (I hope).

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  14. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    On 2008-07-20, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    > I note that you never (during the 10 years that I have read the comp.os.cpm
    > Newsgroup) ever mentioned those programs, or provided them.


    The code belongs to a previous employer; it is not mine to provide.

    > In my humble opinion, MP/M-II is much more impressive than UZI (which is not
    > really Unix Version 7 compatible).


    Be that as it may, you asked in another thread about Linux running on
    64K Z80. It's an answer.
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  15. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    On 2008-07-20, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    > Here, I am of a completely different opinion, since I disassembled the BIOS
    > of CP/M-86 Plus... and it is the same as the BIOS of DOS Plus (which has
    > just an additional module (whose name I don't remember, right now) providing
    > all MS-DOS Version 2 system calls to EXE files).


    DRDOS sources are available at http://www.drdos.net/download.htm

    It's been a very long time since I looked at them, so I don't recall
    what all is there. I know the kernel is and I would expect the BIOS
    sources to be as well.

    Another DOS networking package you might find interesting is NCSA
    Telnet. IIRC (and I probably don't) the DOS internetworking API was
    pretty much invented by the folks doing NCSA telnet and copied by
    everyone else.

    An old article about how DOS internetworking works can be found over at
    http://sunsite.uakom.sk/sunworldonli...nectivity.html
    The google term you'll want to use to find more is "packet drivers" and
    you might want to throw in a "wollongong".

    Entirely off-topic, you might also be interested in the Contiki
    operating system; see http://www.sics.se/contiki/ It's a very small
    operating system that supports internetworking. IIRC (and I probably
    don't) it started out on the Commodore 64.
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  16. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    On 2008-07-20, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    > I note that you never (during the 10 years that I have read the comp.os.cpm
    > Newsgroup) ever mentioned those programs


    2003, only 5 years ago:
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp....7384329a4380ef
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  17. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    *Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France* wrote on Sun, 08-07-20 18:21:
    >How many Linux work on a 4-MHz Z-80 with 64KB of RAM?


    No, you're right. That area truly is a Windows-only domain. So you're
    right, it is the universal OS.


  18. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Axel!

    > Not in my very compact English-French one, agreed.
    > But the full Collins has this:


    Collins is the English name... In France, it is known as "Le Robert et
    Collins"...

    > No need to brag about trivialities. I convert text to raw HTML through
    > self-written scripts all the time in preparation for my site. Not WS4
    > yet, but I wouldn't expect any special problems there.


    Well... It depends what you call "trivialities". I made several programs,
    which 1) converted from WS4 to ASCII, 2) converted from WS4 to HTML, 3) took
    into account the "extended characters" (since WordStar is 7-bit only), 4)
    searched inside a WS4 file for a given string, and 5) worked on a ambiguous
    file specification (that is to say, in English, worked on several WS4 files,
    not just one. All that in BASIC, so that the program is portable under CP/M
    2.2, CP/M-86, and MS-DOS. (I have started using it under Win 98SE, because I
    am working, right now, on adding images in the HTML files.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  19. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Hello, Udo!

    From reading your message, I am afraid that we are not on the same
    wavelength...

    So, let us consider closed this exchange.

    However, I would like you to explain me something that you mentioned, about
    CP/NET:

    > CP/NET was thrown away early in the 80th by DRI, because they figured it
    > is useless compared to other protocols. Since they obviously had DEC
    > equipment at their facility, they knew about Decnet e.g.
    > CP/NET won't run together with TCP/IP, read the specs, it can be
    > tunneled over TCP/IP, very different.


    I can confirm that Digital Research used DEC VAXes. The CP/M Plus BIOS
    provided in the System Guide was connected to a VAX, among other stuff. Now,
    what I don't understand is why you wrote: "CP/NET won't run together with
    TCP/IP, reads the specs"? I have retyped everything that I could find about
    CP/NET (and DR-Net for the IBM PC): nowhere I have seen any such limitation.
    "CP/NET can be tunneled over TCP/IP, that's very different." ? I don't
    understand.

    (I have spent a good deal of time, today, investigating TCP/IP, searching
    how it could be implemented under CP/M.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  20. Re: How many SIG/M disks where there?

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France schrieb:
    ....
    > (You will also note that Unix never got the portability of CP/M COMmand
    > files, able to run under any implementation of CP/M -- claimed to have been
    > more than 3,000 different hardware... Find one single Unix program that has
    > been as portable since Unix exists! I am always amazed, when I read the
    > source code of CP/M utilities written in PL/M, to see the number of versions
    > of CP/M under which they ran, without change. C is several orders of
    > magnitude below this technical performance. I could not believe my eyes when
    > I saw that Intel was dropping PL/M. They really don't understand software.)
    >
    > This will be all (I hope).
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    I have seldom read rubbish worse than this. Obviously you don't know
    that UNIXs on the same platform keept binary compatibility since
    decades, longer than CP/M was used actively. On a 21th century x86 UNIX
    system you could right now run iBCS compatible COFF binaries programmed
    in the 80th. The current ELF 64bit binary format used on all UNIX
    platforms was developed 1993.
    And obviously you did not get some of the released UNIX V7 C sources and
    compiled them on an actual system, 40 years after this C programs were
    written.
    And of course you did not read the history of my z80pack sources,
    programmed more than 2 decades ago on 16bit UNIX, still functional on
    the modernest 64bit Multi-CPU system, x86-64, any RISC systems,
    irrelevant, runs on anything. Thanks god that I used C and not PL/M.

    It is a waste of time to answer junk like this, sigh.

    Udo Munk
    --
    The real fun is building it and then using it...

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