Where can i download cpm - CP/M

This is a discussion on Where can i download cpm - CP/M ; "Thierry B." wrote: > Please don't say "clown" when you use Microsoft Outlook. And what else could I use, Mister-afraid-of-displaying-his-name? Remember, during almost 10 years, the only way to read the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup was for me to go to a ...

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Thread: Where can i download cpm

  1. Re: Where can i download cpm

    "Thierry B." wrote:

    > Please don't say "clown" when you use Microsoft Outlook.


    And what else could I use, Mister-afraid-of-displaying-his-name?

    Remember, during almost 10 years, the only way to read the comp.os.cpm
    Newsgroup was for me to go to a cybercafe, and be obliged to use the various
    Windows versions that they have used, over the years.

    The village where I live finally got the Internet (ADSL), and I bought a
    second-hand portable running Win 98SE to no longer be obliged to drive about
    15 kilometers everytime I want to read/write a message.

    You may remember that I used, during 15 years, an Epson QX-10 under CP/M
    Plus with 4 floppy disk drives. Find me a News reader running under CP/M,
    and I will (me) return to CP/M Plus without any regreat. That's why I worked
    so much on CP/M-86 Plus, in the hope to be able to continue to use CP/M Plus
    on faster hardware. Unfortunately, the BIOS of CP/M-86 Plus was written for
    the PC XT, not the PC AT still used by "IBM Clowns".

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  2. Re: Where can i download cpm

    "Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France" wrote:
    > "Thierry B." wrote:
    >
    >> Please don't say "clown" when you use Microsoft Outlook.

    >
    > And what else could I use, Mister-afraid-of-displaying-his-name?


    Well, Netscape, XNews, Thunderbird come immediately to mind. At
    least one of which has always been available to you during all the
    time in question.

    Since Usenet is specified for pure text use, you could also have
    used CP/M satisfactorily.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.


  3. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Hello, Charles!

    > Well, Netscape, XNews, Thunderbird come immediately to mind. At
    > least one of which has always been available to you during all the
    > time in question.


    IE is provided with Win 98SE. And all the cybercafes that I know, in the
    area, use it.

    > Since Usenet is specified for pure text use, you could also have
    > used CP/M satisfactorily.


    Ha! My dream! To drop WinDoze, and go back to CP/M Plus...

    However, I am afraid that you are forgetting that, the 18 March 2008, in the
    thread "WANTED: Volunteer to Scan Old Programs", I published a grid
    containing all the "Cope Page 850" characters, surrounded by "boxing
    characters".

    That is to say: Google Groups now uses UTF-8.

    I don't know how you read Usenet, but, with Google, the standard character
    set is now UTF-8 (since they need to display chars from as many countries as
    possible).

    (I explained how UTF-8 works in my "WS4-to-UTF-8 File Converter paper: you
    will remember that it is compatible (for 8-bit values) with ASCII.)

    (Finally, could you explain a little bit more what you mean by: "you could
    also have used CP/M satisfactorily"? Do you have access to the Internet with
    your CP/M computer?)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  4. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Hello, Udo!

    Here is a suggestion: you could put the following file (renamed README.ASC)
    on the MP/M-II user number where the telnet-connected user arrives.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France

    MPM2AD.WS4
    ----------

    MP/M II -- Product Brief
    Digital Research

    (Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)


    MP/M II Overview
    ----------------

    MP/M II is a multi-user, multi-tasking operating system designed
    for
    microcomputers that use the Intel 8080/8085 or Zilog Z-80 microprocessors.

    MP/M II is compact and powerful. It has a time-tested, modular design,
    which
    includes:

    - TMP -- Terminal Message Processor
    The human interface of the system, reads the user's command line.

    - CLI -- Command Line Interpreter
    The part of the system responsible for loading programs that
    execute
    user's commands.

    - BDOS -- Basic Disk Operating System
    The portion of the system that manages files and directories,
    consoles
    and printers.

    - XDOS -- Extended Disk Operating System
    The real-time nucleus of MP/M II, which provides dispatching,
    queue,
    flag and time-base management.

    - XIOS -- Extended Input/Output System
    The variant portion of the operating system that contains all
    physical
    hardware-dependent code, such as Input/Output device handlers.

    MP/M II is small, residing in less than 26K bytes of memory, 13K of which
    must
    be common to all users. Total size is dependent on the XIOS and the number
    of
    Resident System Processes (RSP) included when the system is
    generated
    (GENSYS). The size of the XIOS is determined by the number and type
    of
    peripherals supported.


    MP/M II Features
    ----------------

    - A multi-user, multi-tasking operating system
    - Upward compatible with CP/M
    - Record and file locking
    - Date and time stamps, and password protection on files
    - 16 logical drives managing up to 512 Megabytes each,
    for total on-line storage of 8 Gigabytes.
    - Extensive error-handling and reporting
    - Multiple printer support
    - Includes RMAC, LINK-80 and LIB-80
    - CP/NET compatibility


    CP/M Compatibility
    ------------------

    The MP/M II file system is upward compatible with CP/M 1.4 and 2.2 files.
    All
    files generated by CP/M systems may be read under MP/M II. In addition,
    the
    MP/M II file system allows larger files, and supports file
    password
    protection.

    Executable CP/M (COMmand) files will run under MP/M II when the
    following
    criterai are met: (1) the MP/M II system has "bank-select" memory; (2)
    the
    program will run in the memory available in the bank; and (3) the
    program
    communicates with the operating system only through BDOS calls.

    To the end user, MP/M II commands are a superset of CP/M commands.
    Familiar
    CP/M commands such as DIR, ERA, TYPE, PIP and STAT respond similarly in
    MP/M-II.


    Record and File Locking
    -----------------------

    File integrity is enhanced with the MP/M II extended file system. MP/M
    II
    allows files to be opened in one of three modes: locked, unlocked, and
    read-
    only. These three modes are set by the Open File commands through a BDOS
    call.

    Locked mode may be used when it is necessary to assure that only one user
    may
    open a specific file at a given time. Once a file is opened in the
    locked
    mode, other user requests for that file are denied.

    In the unlocked mode, multiple open file requests may be serviced. If a
    file
    is opened in the unlocked mode, individual records or groups of records
    within
    that file may be temporarily locked by a user. Alternately, a record may
    be
    updated with a Test and Write Record command. In this case, before an
    update
    is performed, an unaltered copy of the record in memory is compared with
    the
    record on the disk. If the disk copy has been altered, an error message
    is
    returned to the application program.

    Finally, the read-only mode allows more than one process to open a
    file.
    Attempts to write to a file opened in this mode are denied.


    Password Protection on Directories and Files
    --------------------------------------------

    Protection for user files and directories is enhanced through the optional
    use
    of passwords. MP/M II allows a user to assign passwords to files
    and
    directoriy labels. Application programs may employ a password
    checking
    procedure to determine access authorization before opening files.
    Passwords
    are encrypted to provide additional security.


    Date and Time Stamping
    ----------------------

    MP/M II's extended directory entries provide a facility for date and
    time
    stamping files. Each file may have up to two date and time stamps.
    This
    feature is controlled by an attribute in the directory label, which may be
    set
    by the system manager, and provides the ability to automatically add date
    and
    time of last update, and either access or file creation. The SDIR
    utility
    displays date and time stamp information.


    Disk Management
    ---------------

    MP/M II can support up to 16 logical drives, each containing up to
    512
    Megabytes, for a maximum of 8 Gigabytes of on-line storage. Any one file
    can
    be up to 32 Megabytes in size, with space dynamically allocated and
    released.
    Each drive has a directory which maps each file's physical locations on
    the
    disk. Disk definition tables in the XIOS translate the logical
    drive,
    directory and file structure to the physical characteristics of the disk.
    One
    physical disk can be treated as one or more logical drives by MP/M II.


    Error Handling and Reporting
    ----------------------------

    MP/M II can handle errors in three mode: (1) it can display an error
    message
    and terminate the user's program; (2) it can display an error message
    and
    return to the user's program; or (3) it can return to the user's
    program
    without displaying an error message. In modes (2) and (3), the BDOS returns
    an
    error code which may be trapped by the application program. The
    application
    program can then provide more specific error handling and information.


    Multiple Printer Support
    ------------------------

    MP/M II supports up to 16 list devices, typically printers and teletypes.
    At
    the application program level, a call to the BDOS allows the selection of
    a
    particular list device. Additionally, list devices may be assigned
    dynamically
    by using the PRINTER utility.


    Network Interface
    -----------------

    MP/M II supports the Digital Research network operating system, CP/NET,
    which
    allows users to interconnect multiple microcomputers. Users may run
    standard
    CP/M programs which transparently share disks, printers and other
    network
    devices. Additionally, the electronic mail feature of CP/NET provides
    for
    message communication among users.


    RMAC, LINK-80 and LIB-80
    ------------------------

    The MP/M II package includes Digital Research's RMAC, relocating
    macro
    assembler, LINK-80, our linkage editor with overlay capability, XREF,
    which
    uses the output of RMAC to produce a cross-reference file of symbols used
    in
    the program, and LIB-80, a library manager. These utilities will help
    OEMs
    maintain software in the field. Users of compiled languages, which
    generate
    relocatable modules, can utilize the overlay capability of LINK-80.


    Memory Management
    -----------------

    MP/M II can manage up to 400K bytes of RAM. The nucleus of the
    operating
    system requires a 16K of common memory. The remainder may be switched in up
    to
    48K banks among seven users. The eighth bank contains the banked portion
    of
    the operating system, including Resident System Processes (RSP).
    Memory
    allocation is done on a best-fit basis.


    MP/M II Dispatcher
    ------------------

    The MP/M II dispatcher, that portion of the XDOS which changes the
    currently
    executing task, requires from 600-900 microseconds to switch tasks (4-MHz
    Z-
    80). This low overhead leads to greater system throughput. For
    real-time
    applications, the interrupt mechanism is disabled for less than
    150
    microseconds during a dispatch. Thus, high-prority interrupts may be
    serviced
    in a timely fashion.


    Customization
    -------------

    MP/M II may be transported to a specific 8080/8085 or Z-80
    hardware
    environment by tailoring its loader and hardware-dependent module
    (XIOS).
    Either MP/M 1.1 or CP/M 2.2 must first be implemented on the target machine.

    The MP/M Loader (MPMLDR) may be executed under CP/M or,
    following
    reconfiguration, it may be loaded from the system tracks of the disk by
    the
    cold start loader. The MPMLDR is specially configured for a
    particular
    environment by inserting the BIOS code from CP/M into the MPMLDR BIOS.

    The hardware-dependent module of MP/M II (XIOS) must also be
    reconfigured.
    Much of the device handling code, as well as Disk Drive Definition tables,
    may
    be copied from the CP/M BIOS. Once a simple system is running, support
    for
    additional consoles, the system closk, bank-select memory and
    interrupt-driven
    devices may be introduced. MP/M II can be loaded and executed under the
    CP/M
    debugger (DDT).

    Two samples of an XIOS are included in the MP/M II Documentation.


    MP/M II Utilities
    -----------------

    ABORT
    The Abort utility allows a user to terminate a running program.

    ATTACH
    The Attach utility attaches a program to a console.

    ASM
    The latest version of the CP/M assembler supports Intel mnemonics.

    CONSOLE
    The Console utility displays the system console number of the
    requesting
    console.

    DIR
    The Directory utility displays a disk directory for the currently-logged
    user.
    By setting the SYS attribute, files may be made invisible to this utility.

    DSKRESET
    The Disk Reset utility resets the allocation map of a drive after
    the
    insertion of a new diskette. This allows a write to the new diskette.

    ED
    The latest version of the CP/M editor is included.

    ERA
    The Erase utility erases a file or files; may be password-protected.

    ERAQ
    The Erase with Query utility queries the user for confirmation before
    erasing
    each specified file.

    MPMSTAT
    The MP/M Statistics utility displays the run-time system status of MP/M II.

    PIP
    The Peripheral Interchange Program supports the movement of files among
    the
    various logical devices and drives of the system. PIP also concatenates
    files,
    or extracts portions of ASCII files. Options in PIP allow for archiving
    files
    that have been updated, and for moving files between different directories.

    PRINTER
    The Printer utility sets the list device for a particular console.
    Several
    consoles may share the same list device, but only one can "own" it at a
    time.

    PRLCOM
    The PRL-to-COM utility creates an absolute executable (COMmand) file from
    a
    Page ReLocatable (PRL) file.

    RDT
    The RDT utility is a relocatable version of the Dynamic Debugging Tool
    (DDT).

    REN
    The Rename utility renames MP/M II files.

    SCHED
    The MP/M Scheduler executes a specified program on a specified date, at
    a
    given time.

    SDIR
    The SDIR utility displays all types of MP/M II files, as well as their
    size,
    time and date stamps, and a notation as to whether or not the file
    is
    password-protected.

    SET
    The Set utility the setting of various file attributes and passwords.
    These
    attributes include Read-Only, SYS (invisible to DIR), and
    user-defined
    attributes.

    SHOW
    The Show utility displays information about the characteristics of a
    logical
    drive, such as capacity, number of directory entries and directory
    label
    information.

    SPOOL
    The Spool utility sends files to the spool queue for proper handling by
    the
    list device.

    STAT
    The Statistics utility displays the space, attribute and directory status
    of
    drives and files.

    STOPSPLR
    The STOPSPLR utility stops the spooling operation in progress, and empties
    the
    spool queue.

    SUBMIT
    The Submit utility executes files of commands, each of which may be a
    program.

    TOD
    The Time Of Day utility displays or sets the system date and time.

    TYPE
    The Type utility types the specified ASCII file on the console.

    USER
    The User utility displays or sets the current user (directory) number.

    Any or all of the above utilities may be password-protected for
    increased
    system security.


    MP/M II Memory Organization
    ---------------------------

    0FFFFH +------------------+--+
    | Common | |
    | BDOS, XDOS | | Common
    | XIOS, DATA | | Memory
    | Areas & Resident | | (13K - 16K)
    | System Processes | |
    +--+------------------+--+
    | | Banked Portions |
    (48K- | | of BDOS, XDOS, | +-----------+ +-----------+
    51K) | | XIOS, DATA Areas,| | Transient | | Transient |
    | | TMP & Banked | | Program | | Program |
    | | Resident System | | Area (TPA)| | Area (TPA)|
    | | Processes (RSP) | | | | |
    000H +--+------------------+ +-----------+ +-----------+
    Bank 0 Bank 1 Bank n


    MP/M II Package
    ---------------

    MP/M II is shipped on two single-sided, single-density, 8-inch diskettes
    with
    an IBM-compatible physical format. These diskettes contain the
    following
    machine readable files:

    Distribution Disk 1
    -------------------
    BNKBDOS.SPR
    MPMSTAT.RSP
    SCHED.BRS
    CONSOLE.PRL
    ERA.PRL
    PRINTER.PRL
    SCHED.PRL
    SPOOL.PRL
    TOD.PRL
    GENHEX.COM
    LINK.COM
    XREF.COM
    RESBDOS.SPR
    SCHED.RSP
    SPOOL.BRS
    DIR.PRL
    ERAQ.PRL
    PRLCOM.PRL
    SDIR.PRL
    STAT.PRL
    TYPE.PRL
    GENMOD.COM
    LOAD.COM
    XDOS.SPR
    SPOOL.RSP
    ABORT.PRL
    DUMP.PRL
    MPMSTAT.PRL
    RDT.PRL
    SET.PRL
    STOPSPLR.PRL
    USER.PRL
    GENSYS.COM
    MPMLDR.COM
    ABORT.RSP
    MPMSTAT.BRS
    ASM.PRL
    ED.PRL
    PIP.COM
    REN.PRL
    SHOW.PRL
    SUBMIT.PRL
    DDT.COM
    LIB.COM
    RMAC.COM

    Distribution Disk 2
    -------------------
    LDRBIOS.ASM
    MDSXIOS.ASM
    BOOT.ASM
    BNKXIOS.ASM
    DEBLOCK.ASM
    TODCNV.ASM
    DUMP.ASM
    DISKDEF.LIB


    System Performance Reporting
    ----------------------------

    MP/M II is supported by Digital Research's Software Performance Report
    (SPR)
    system. This service provides a prompt response to technical
    problems
    associated with MP/M II. Users are provided with SPR forms which serve as
    a
    communications device to inform the Digital Research Product Support staff
    of
    user-identified problems. The SPR Status Report periodically informs MP/M
    II
    users of product updates and revisions.


    Hardware Requirements
    ---------------------

    - 8080/8085 or Z-80 microprocessor, 1 to 16 disk drives of up to
    512
    Megabytes capacity each, 1 to 16 ASCII consoles, 1 to 16 printers
    and
    a real-time closk.
    - 48K of RAM
    - CP/M 2.2 or MP/M 1.1 must be implemented on the target machine.


    MP/M II Upgrade Kit
    -------------------

    This package converts MP/M 1.1 systems into MP/M II systems. It is
    available
    only to registered MP/M 1.1 users. Due to its new XIOS requirements, it
    will
    be necessary to reinstall MP/M II. System users unfamiliar with
    assembly
    language programming should purchase an MP/M II upgrade kit from
    their
    hardware manufacturer either directly or through a dealer.


    Digital Research
    ----------------

    Digital Research, Pacific Grove, CA is the leading producer of
    microcomputer
    operating systems and utilities. For eight years, Digital Research has
    been
    involved with the design, development and support of microcomputer
    software.
    The single user operating system CP/M, multiuser MP/M II and local
    area
    network CP/NET form the basis of a family of operating system
    software
    products spanning 8- and 16-bit microcomputers. Digital Research users
    include
    over 250,000 systems, 300 OEMs and 400 independent software houses.


    Ordering Information
    --------------------

    Product Order Description
    -------------- -----------------
    MP/M II System Two 8" single-density, single-sided diskettes and
    five
    manuals, including the MAC and LINK-80 documentation.
    MP/M II Doc Three manuals: "MP/M II User's Guide", "MP/M II
    Programmer's
    Guide", and "MP/M II System Guide".


    EOF




  5. Re: Where can i download cpm

    On 2008-07-16, Axel Berger wrote:
    > *Roger Ivie* wrote on Wed, 08-07-16 21:26:
    >>> Beg to differ. Apricot F-series. Sanyo MBC-55x.

    >> DEC Rainbow. DECmate II with XPU. Attache with DOS add-on card. Victor.

    >
    > Thanks, I never knew there were different versions of MS-DOS around.
    > But then the argument still holds -- you can't customize it yourself,
    > as you can CP/M, but need to buy the correct OS for the machine or vice
    > versa.


    It's primarily a problem of getting your hands on the appropriate
    manual. I don't know how hard it was to get the documentation from
    Microsoft, since I never tried. Development efforts I was involved with
    that embedded an operating system either used stock PC-DOS, a customized
    CP/M-80, RT-11 with a custom driver or two, or VMS.

    For DR-DOS, documentation is (once again) available on-line over at
    http://www.drdos.net/documentation/ In particular, take a look at
    http://www.drdos.net/documentation/sysprog/httoc.htm

    I don't know how complete the DR-DOS documentation is. It seems to
    assume you have access to a "System Builder's Kit".
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  6. Re: Where can i download cpm



    "Axel Berger" wrote in message
    news:200807161503.a53863@b.maus.de...
    > *Tom Lake* wrote on Wed, 08-07-16 03:06:
    >>It's not like MS-DOS that can run on many different clones.

    >
    > That's somewhere in between misleading and wrong.
    >
    > The real difference is that MS-DOS can't be customized at all and one
    > single hardware platform has to be cloned for it to run at all.


    The point was that you could take MS-DOS from most vendors (Tandy 2000
    and Sanyo MS-DOS were two exceptions) and run it. You couldn't run
    Commodore CP/M on a Tandy Model 4, nor could you run Osborne CP/M
    on a Kaypro. You couldn't even run some Kaypro CP/Ms on other Kaypros!
    That was the point I was trying to make. It makes no difference to the point
    I was making that the hardware has to be cloned. The fact remains that you
    can't just download any old CP/M and expect it to work on your 8080 or Z-80
    system whereas you have an excellent chance of downloading a copy of
    MS-DOS and being able to run it on your 8088-based system. If the OP was
    only familiar with MS-DOS systems, he may not have been aware of that fact.

    Tom Lake


  7. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France schrieb:
    > Hello, Udo!
    >
    >> To try MP/M (multiuser CP/M) without any download at all try telnet
    >> www.unix4fun.org port 4050 or port 4051.

    >
    > I just did that!

    ....
    ....
    > The problem, for a new comer, is that your MP/M system has precious little
    > software. For example, I was surprised that there was not even a HELP
    > available...


    CP/M and MP/M manuals are at the well known web site. If I'm new to
    something I read the manuals and I don't expect that an airplane
    explains to me how to fly it, at least not an oldtimer one.

    If you guys tell me which software you want on that MP/M system I can
    copy that over, no problem. I just use it as a test machine and for that
    it has everything I need.

    > When you type DIR, you only see 4 or 5 files. If you don't how how to
    > display SYStem files (different under MP/M-II than under CP/M Plus), you are
    > in a endless loop.


    If you are completely new to CP/M you won't even know to type dir for a
    directory listing ;-) Now what?

    > On my Hard Disk, somewhere, I have a text file explaining MP/M-II. Do you
    > want it, so that people trying your MP/M-II system can read something about
    > it?


    I can copy it on that system, no problem. Personally I think reading PDF
    manuals with a more comfortable system is better, but who knows, that's
    just me.

    > (Write me privately for the details.)
    >
    > (Also, you could put some "ASCII graphics" (like Snoopy) on the system. By


    ASCII graphics, aha, good that I implemented a 512MB harddisk just to
    see if that really would work with the 1981 DRI software. Now I know for
    what to use the thing ;-)

    > the way, the standard line telling which version of MP/M-II, and how much
    > TPA, is available (the boot message), were not visible during my trial. I
    > suggest to add them.)


    I suggest to get familar with MP/M ;-) The boot messages is send once to
    all terminals, if it was read it is gone. Someone was faster than you
    and connected to the freshly rebootet the system and got that boot messages.


    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    Udo Munk
    --
    The real fun is building it and then using it...

  8. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France schrieb:
    > Hello, Udo!
    >
    > Here is a suggestion: you could put the following file (renamed README.ASC)
    > on the MP/M-II user number where the telnet-connected user arrives.
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    OK, will do.

    Udo Munk
    --
    The real fun is building it and then using it...

  9. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Axel Berger wrote:
    > *Roger Ivie* wrote on Wed, 08-07-16 21:26:
    >
    >> Beg to differ. Apricot F-series. Sanyo MBC-55x. DEC Rainbow.
    >> DECmate II with XPU. Attache with DOS add-on card. Victor.

    >
    > Thanks, I never knew there were different versions of MS-DOS
    > around. But then the argument still holds -- you can't customize
    > it yourself, as you can CP/M, but need to buy the correct OS for
    > the machine or vice versa.


    Yes you can customize itself. The 'portable' MSDOS depends on the
    bios calls via interrupts. It doesn't know about the hardware,
    i.e. such things as locations of display memory, etc. The result
    is slower.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



  10. Re: Where can i download cpm

    "Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France" wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > Ha! My dream! To drop WinDoze, and go back to CP/M Plus...
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > That is to say: Google Groups now uses UTF-8.
    >
    > I don't know how you read Usenet, but, with Google, the standard
    > character set is now UTF-8 (since they need to display chars from
    > as many countries as possible).


    Google is a faulty Usenet server. And Microsoft software is
    generally faulty, and ignores standards. A Usenet message should
    carry the following header line:

    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

    with the stuff after the '=' sign variable. That allows the
    receiver to make the necessary adjustments.

    Just mount something sane, such as Thunderbird, and get a
    newsserver set up. Some candidates are:

    Some free news servers. I use motzarella, teranews and gmane.
    (1 time charge) (free)
    (free)
    (free)
    (free)
    (free)
    (mail-lists via news) (free)
    (pay)
    <http://www.individual.net/ (low pay)

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



  11. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Hello, Roger!

    > It's primarily a problem of getting your hands on the appropriate manual.


    I was thinking so, until I disassembled the BIOS of CP/M-86 Plus, and found
    myself faced to several hundred KBs of 8086 code, without any idea (or
    theory) of what was going on. Now, I think that some experience writing
    BIOSes and checking that the hardware answers correctly, is needed.

    > For DR-DOS, documentation is (once again) available on-line over at
    > http://www.drdos.net/documentation/ In particular, take a look at
    > http://www.drdos.net/documentation/sysprog/httoc.htm


    Wahoo! Very interesting! "The sample BIOS supplied with the DR-DOS System
    Builder Kit is for the IBM PS2/AT/XT/PC or compatible machine." So, if I
    could get this "DR-DOS OEM System Builder Kit", maybe I could re-use it for
    CP/M-86 Plus?

    > I don't know how complete the DR-DOS documentation is. It seems to
    > assume you have access to a "System Builder's Kit".


    This is also what I understand. And I have found:

    DR-System Builder Kit
    ------------------------

    At the foundation of Caldera, DR-SBK is an aggressive OEM support program to
    lower the risk and decrease the time-to-market for OEMs that utilize DR-DOS
    and DR-WebSpyder. Caldera provides OEMs with support, training and
    consultancy services, with a pricing model that allows for flexibility in
    selecting DR-DOS &/or DR-WebSpyder components for embedded use. DR-SBK
    includes redistribution kits, printed and on-line documentation and OEM
    tools for both DR-WebSpyder and DR-DOS, plus the kernel source code for
    DR-DOS.

    Availability & Pricing
    ---------------------

    DR-DOS 7.02 began shipping on March 16 (1998) and is available for
    individual and OEM usage. The pricing model begins at $29 for a single copy
    of the entire DR-DOS system and aggressively scales to component-based
    pricing for OEMs.

    The DR-System Builder Kit (DR-SBK) is available immediately and costs $495.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  12. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Hello, Axel!

    > As your English is better than their French, why do you not do as I do
    > and use the original version?


    Me, get the Windows manuals?

    In France, we have a saying (that I will try to translate): "You don't dine
    with the Devil, even with a very, very long fork."

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  13. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Udo Munk wrote in news:g5np6h$fi7$00$1@news.t-
    online.com:

    > If you guys tell me which software you want on that MP/M system I can
    > copy that over, no problem. I just use it as a test machine and for that
    > it has everything I need.


    Ah, what memories that would bring back. Would be nice to play around with
    Wordstar, Condor Jr., dBase, WordPerfect 5.1 again.

  14. Re: Where can i download cpm

    On 2008-07-16 12:40:08 -0700, "Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France"
    said:

    >>> Beg to differ. Apricot F-series. Sanyo MBC-55x.

    >>
    >> DEC Rainbow. DECmate II with XPU. Attache with DOS add-on card. Victor.

    >
    > There was a series of articles, in MicroSystems, explaining how to port
    > MS-DOS to non IBM Clown hardware. The article I read talked about a S-100
    > Bus implementation of MS-DOS.
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    Just out of curiosity, do you happen to have a reference of this
    article? It sounds pretty interesting!


  15. Re: Where can i download cpm

    Hello, William!

    > > There was a series of articles, in MicroSystems, explaining how to port
    > > MS-DOS to non IBM Clown hardware. The article I read talked about a

    S-100
    > > Bus implementation of MS-DOS.


    > Just out of curiosity, do you happen to have a reference of this
    > article? It sounds pretty interesting!


    ??? This is the comp.os.CPM Newsgroup, not MeSs-DOS...

    Anyway, I am back from the library. Despite a half-an-hour search, I was
    unable to find the stack of MicroSystems magazines. I have the first 10
    years of DDJ, and re-found the Foglight newsletters, but impossible to find
    the MicroSystems. I only had about a dozen, that were given to me by others
    CP/M Old Timers in France.

    Year after year, my problem is to get copies of articles that were once
    published in some long-dead microcomputer magazines. It is a pity that there
    is no CP/M User's Group in the USA which could store and archive those
    magazines. Last year, I read a page from a Californian computer museum,
    saying that they were receiving so much stuff that 99% was going to the
    garbage bin...

    They did not have the idea to store it and sell it on eBay! The Americans
    are really rich. They don't mind trashing anything more than 6 months old.
    Me, I kept using daily my Epson QX-10 during 15 years, and I wish that I
    could find as good a screen on the IBM Clowns (but I know that it is
    impossible, and will be more and more impossible. If my eyesight worsens, I
    will be obliged to go back to the QX-10. The equivalent simply does not
    exist among the IBM Clowns.)

    So, sorry, but I am unable to answer your request. I am 100% percent that I
    am not making an error, and can even say that it was published in the second
    version of MicroSystems, called, if I remember well, Micro Systems, when Sol
    Libes re-bought the title that a commercial company had dropped.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




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