CP/M BBS Systems - CP/M

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  1. CP/M BBS Systems

    All:

    I'm toying with doing a BBS demo for VCFe. I was going to use a Windows
    box as the server for classic machines at VCFe to dial into. Based on
    something Herb told me, I decided that a more authentic BBS experience might
    be had if I could put it together using CP/M and an S100 crate. So, I
    decided to probe my WC-CDROM archive and I actually came up with a few BBS
    systems.

    Not knowing much about them, I wanted to throw this open for comment.
    There are a few different ones in the archive: Citadel, RBBS, MBBS, and
    QBBS, among a few which are compiled MBASIC-based BBSes and some that I
    donšt remember the name right now.

    I havenšt de-LBRed all of these yet to get at the documents but I
    wondered if anyone had a recommendation based on these names.

    Thanks.


    Rich
    -----
    http://www.altair32.com
    http://www.classiccmp.org/cini



  2. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Jim Bianchi wrote in
    news:slrng5olen.o3q.jimbo@bolt.sonic.net:

    > On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 18:56:39 -0400, Richard A. Cini wrote:
    >> All:
    >> I'm toying with doing a BBS demo for VCFe. I was going to use a
    >> Windows
    >> box as the server for classic machines at VCFe to dial into. Based on
    >> something Herb told me, I decided that a more authentic BBS
    >> experience might be had if I could put it together using CP/M and an
    >> S100 crate. So, I decided to probe my WC-CDROM archive and I actually
    >> came up with a few BBS systems.
    >>
    >> Not knowing much about them, I wanted to throw this open for
    >> comment.
    >> There are a few different ones in the archive: Citadel, RBBS, MBBS,
    >> and QBBS, among a few which are compiled MBASIC-based BBSes and some
    >> that I donšt remember the name right now.
    >>
    >> I havenšt de-LBRed all of these yet to get at the documents but I
    >> wondered if anyone had a recommendation based on these names.

    >
    > As I recall, MBBS was an extremely early BBS system (not to be
    > confused with MBBS which was a commercial, for-pay only, multi line,
    > subscription BBS system). MBBS. RBBS, QBBS, and HBBS were all compiled
    > 8080/z80 assy pgms. as were most of the other CP/M based BBS systems.
    > They also depended on another pgm called BYEx.COM (I b'lieve the last
    > version was BYE51O.COM) which provided the ..ah, interface, between
    > the BBS pgm itself and CP/M. You edited a file (BYE5.ASM) to account
    > for the makeup of your computer and BBS system and your choices as
    > sysop, them compiled it and dropped your choice of BBS in on top of
    > it. HBBS was a massively cleaned up version of the original MBBS and
    > was written by the late Irv Hoff. If you can get it, it's by far the
    > smoothest and fastest running of all the xBBS varients.


    Just to correct Jim slightly, HBBS was a modified (and highly
    personalized) version of PBBS. Irv and I had several high-octane
    disagreements about the future directions for PBBS (for which Irv
    was a beta tester and contributor). So, Irv decided to go his own
    way and added everything that HE wanted into the source for PBBS,
    renamed it and released it as HBBS.

    I would, of course, be remiss if I didn't recommend PBBS for your
    project. In MY opinion, it has everything that you would need. (=:

    Ian (author, PBBS)

  3. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    > If you want my recommendatiom, for a demo BBS system, use an old
    > x486 CPU, get DR-DOS V6, and run Citadel or Maximus (another freebie DOS
    > based BBS system). Or hey, for a while there was a DOS based BBS system that
    > was merely a huge {COMMO} macro! COMMO was an extremely flexible terminal
    > program. It could run a BBS system - I used it for a year.


    Or RCPM? I think the original poster was talking about CP/M hosting.

    The really amazing thing about the {COMMO} macro was that the guy who
    wrote it was nearly blind, completely deaf, and had serious muscular
    control issues, due to suffering from the neurological disease where
    small growths attack the nerve bundles. He used screen magnification
    software, I think, and basically rubbed his eyeball on the screen
    to read it even so. He'd call me to talk BBS via the Michigan Relay
    Center -- he'd talk, but the operators would transcribe what I'd say.
    The poor operators, confronted with techno-babble! It always seemed
    easier to me to call his board and use his chat system. He showed up
    at a local BBS picnic one time, and we would "talk" to him by writing
    letters on his palm with our fingers.

    De

  4. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Ian Cottrell wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > Just to correct Jim slightly, HBBS was a modified (and highly
    > personalized) version of PBBS. Irv and I had several high-octane
    > disagreements about the future directions for PBBS (for which Irv
    > was a beta tester and contributor). So, Irv decided to go his own
    > way and added everything that HE wanted into the source for PBBS,
    > renamed it and released it as HBBS.


    I had several disagreements with Irv Hoff, usually about his
    penchant for reformatting my code when he modified it. The result
    was something that didn't work, and I couldn't even find out where
    he had modified it. I last remember yelling at him about LT a few
    years before his unfortunate death.

    Taut assembly code no longer seems to get passed around and
    improved. In any system. Well, maybe some embedded stuff does.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Dennis Boone wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > The really amazing thing about the {COMMO} macro was that the guy who
    > wrote it was nearly blind, completely deaf, and had serious muscular
    > control issues, due to suffering from the neurological disease where
    > small growths attack the nerve bundles. He used screen magnification
    > software, I think, and basically rubbed his eyeball on the screen
    > to read it even so. He'd call me to talk BBS via the Michigan Relay
    > Center -- he'd talk, but the operators would transcribe what I'd say.
    > The poor operators, confronted with techno-babble! It always seemed
    > easier to me to call his board and use his chat system. He showed up
    > at a local BBS picnic one time, and we would "talk" to him by writing
    > letters on his palm with our fingers.


    Please don't snip attributions for material you quote.

    That man (I forget his name) was, I think, in New Haven. I made
    some modifications in several of my systems for his benefit,
    basically to adapt to his output mechanisms. He ran some sort of
    DEC system for SNET, the local phone company. IIRC you can see
    some of the adaptations in LT and DOSPLUS, both available on the
    CP/M section of my download page.

    If he wasn't the same guy, he was still amazing in what he could
    do.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Jun 21, 3:20 am, CBFalconer wrote:
    > Dennis Boone wrote:
    >
    > ... snip ...
    >
    > > The really amazing thing about the {COMMO} macro was that the guy who
    > > wrote it was nearly blind, completely deaf, and had serious muscular
    > > control issues, due to suffering from the neurological disease where
    > > small growths attack the nerve bundles. He used screen magnification
    > > software, I think, and basically rubbed his eyeball on the screen
    > > to read it even so. He'd call me to talk BBS via the Michigan Relay
    > > Center -- he'd talk, but the operators would transcribe what I'd say.
    > > The poor operators, confronted with techno-babble! It always seemed
    > > easier to me to call his board and use his chat system. He showed up
    > > at a local BBS picnic one time, and we would "talk" to him by writing
    > > letters on his palm with our fingers.

    >
    > Please don't snip attributions for material you quote.
    >
    > That man (I forget his name) was, I think, in New Haven. I made
    > some modifications in several of my systems for his benefit,
    > basically to adapt to his output mechanisms. He ran some sort of
    > DEC system for SNET, the local phone company. IIRC you can see
    > some of the adaptations in LT and DOSPLUS, both available on the
    > CP/M section of my download page.
    >
    > If he wasn't the same guy, he was still amazing in what he could
    > do.
    >
    > --
    > [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    > [page]:
    > Try the download section.
    >
    > ** Posted fromhttp://www.teranews.com**


    That would of course be Howard Goldstein, whose contribution to CP/M
    and Z-System is / was without equal.

    I'm not recommending it but it was / is a very interesting BBS - ROS,
    Remote Operating System, by Steve Fox. Written in Turbo Pascal. I was
    reminded of his contribution during my (still ongong) Turbo Pascal 2.0
    Reference Manual OCR / Scanning project (http://primepuzzle.com/tp2/).
    One of the something like 5 sample programs on the development page
    was written by Steve.

    Lee Bradley

  7. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Lee wrote:
    > CBFalconer wrote:
    >> Dennis Boone wrote:
    >>
    >> ... snip ...
    >>
    >>> The really amazing thing about the {COMMO} macro was that the guy who
    >>> wrote it was nearly blind, completely deaf, and had serious muscular
    >>> control issues, due to suffering from the neurological disease where
    >>> small growths attack the nerve bundles. He used screen magnification
    >>> software, I think, and basically rubbed his eyeball on the screen
    >>> to read it even so. He'd call me to talk BBS via the Michigan Relay
    >>> Center -- he'd talk, but the operators would transcribe what I'd say.
    >>> The poor operators, confronted with techno-babble! It always seemed
    >>> easier to me to call his board and use his chat system. He showed up
    >>> at a local BBS picnic one time, and we would "talk" to him by writing
    >>> letters on his palm with our fingers.

    >>
    >> Please don't snip attributions for material you quote.
    >>
    >> That man (I forget his name) was, I think, in New Haven. I made
    >> some modifications in several of my systems for his benefit,
    >> basically to adapt to his output mechanisms. He ran some sort of
    >> DEC system for SNET, the local phone company. IIRC you can see
    >> some of the adaptations in LT and DOSPLUS, both available on the
    >> CP/M section of my download page.
    >>
    >> If he wasn't the same guy, he was still amazing in what he could
    >> do.

    >
    > That would of course be Howard Goldstein, whose contribution to CP/M
    > and Z-System is / was without equal.
    >
    > I'm not recommending it but it was / is a very interesting BBS - ROS,
    > Remote Operating System, by Steve Fox. Written in Turbo Pascal. I was
    > reminded of his contribution during my (still ongong) Turbo Pascal 2.0
    > Reference Manual OCR / Scanning project (http://primepuzzle.com/tp2/).
    > One of the something like 5 sample programs on the development page
    > was written by Steve.


    That name strikes a bell, and that was the guy. I wonder what
    happened to him. I remember seeing some mention of him 5 to 10
    years ago.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  8. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On 6/20/08 10:39 PM, in article
    Xns9AC3E68847D7iancottrell3webcom@216.196.97.131, "Ian Cottrell"
    wrote:

    > Just to correct Jim slightly, HBBS was a modified (and highly
    > personalized) version of PBBS. Irv and I had several high-octane
    > disagreements about the future directions for PBBS (for which Irv
    > was a beta tester and contributor). So, Irv decided to go his own
    > way and added everything that HE wanted into the source for PBBS,
    > renamed it and released it as HBBS.
    >
    > I would, of course, be remiss if I didn't recommend PBBS for your
    > project. In MY opinion, it has everything that you would need. (=:
    >
    > Ian (author, PBBS)


    Thanks for the historical sequencing. I'm going to pull a copy of PBBS and
    read up on it. I suppose the WCCDROM archive also has the BYEx program that
    I should locate as well.

    Based on reading this thread it seems that most if not all of the original
    CP/M-based BBS programs (maybe except that commercial one) were single-node
    programs. Is this because the S100 systems didn't have the MHz in order to
    effectively service more than one connection or was it because of
    limitations with CP/M, or both?

    Rich


  9. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    "Richard A. Cini" wrote in message
    news:C482700C.1C7C5%rcini@optonline.net...
    > Based on reading this thread it seems that most if not all of the original
    > CP/M-based BBS programs (maybe except that commercial one) were
    > single-node
    > programs. Is this because the S100 systems didn't have the MHz in order to
    > effectively service more than one connection or was it because of
    > limitations with CP/M, or both?


    You just jogged a memory with that question. I did some work for a guy who
    was running a BBS on an 4MHz MP/M system. I added file locking code to the
    disk access routines and a couple of other tweaks so he could run four
    copies of the program at the same time on his four user MP/M system. He
    kept one user for himself and connected the other three to modems. I can't
    recall the name of the system now, but it was written in Turbo Pascal.

    - Bill


  10. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Jun 21, 7:36 am, CBFalconer wrote:
    > Lee wrote:
    > > CBFalconer wrote:
    > >> Dennis Boone wrote:

    >
    > >> ... snip ...

    >
    > >>> The really amazing thing about the {COMMO} macro was that the guy who
    > >>> wrote it was nearly blind, completely deaf, and had serious muscular
    > >>> control issues, due to suffering from the neurological disease where
    > >>> small growths attack the nerve bundles. He used screen magnification
    > >>> software, I think, and basically rubbed his eyeball on the screen
    > >>> to read it even so. He'd call me to talk BBS via the Michigan Relay
    > >>> Center -- he'd talk, but the operators would transcribe what I'd say.
    > >>> The poor operators, confronted with techno-babble! It always seemed
    > >>> easier to me to call his board and use his chat system. He showed up
    > >>> at a local BBS picnic one time, and we would "talk" to him by writing
    > >>> letters on his palm with our fingers.

    >
    > >> Please don't snip attributions for material you quote.

    >
    > >> That man (I forget his name) was, I think, in New Haven. I made
    > >> some modifications in several of my systems for his benefit,
    > >> basically to adapt to his output mechanisms. He ran some sort of
    > >> DEC system for SNET, the local phone company. IIRC you can see
    > >> some of the adaptations in LT and DOSPLUS, both available on the
    > >> CP/M section of my download page.

    >
    > >> If he wasn't the same guy, he was still amazing in what he could
    > >> do.

    >
    > > That would of course be Howard Goldstein, whose contribution to CP/M
    > > and Z-System is / was without equal.

    >
    > > I'm not recommending it but it was / is a very interesting BBS - ROS,
    > > Remote Operating System, by Steve Fox. Written in Turbo Pascal. I was
    > > reminded of his contribution during my (still ongong) Turbo Pascal 2.0
    > > Reference Manual OCR / Scanning project (http://primepuzzle.com/tp2/).
    > > One of the something like 5 sample programs on the development page
    > > was written by Steve.

    >
    > That name strikes a bell, and that was the guy. I wonder what
    > happened to him. I remember seeing some mention of him 5 to 10
    > years ago.
    >
    > --
    > [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    > [page]:
    > Try the download section.
    >
    > ** Posted fromhttp://www.teranews.com**


    Howard Goldstein is still around and still in New Haven. He's a good
    friend and we exchange emails and visits pretty regularly. The fellow
    Dennis Boone is talking about is not Howard. Howard (has just told me
    that he) had nothing to do with COMMO nor did he use the Michigan
    Relay System. He is blind and is able to hear with a hearing aid which
    is probably why you thought of him when Dennis described him.

  11. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Hello, Richard!

    Maybe you forgot my message about a CBBS system that was running under CP/M
    in the USA? (message published the 25 September 2006. Just before is a copy
    of the information file from this RCP/M.)

    --------------

    Ok. Bill, now that you have read what I had found several years ago, please
    note the following:

    1) This RCP/M (or BBS, as you want) was still running in 1991
    2) It was running under CP/M,
    2) using Heath hardware,
    3) and CBASIC Compiler and "Access Manager" as software...

    And those last 2 (CBASIC Compiler and "Access Manager") are available for:

    1) CP/M 2.2
    2) MS-DOS
    3) CP/M-86

    That is to say: using a standard "IBM Clown", you could re-open this system,
    simply exchanging the Heath hardware for an IBM Clown running xxx times
    faster!

    Now, do you understand why I saved this message?

    The software is available, the hardware can be gotten in a garbage can (I am
    told...).

    All that is missing is someone willing to do it.

    In addition, there were a few people who were using this system, who could
    be
    interested in re-launching it today, using CP/M-86, and who could help you
    with the details.

    Good luck!

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"




  12. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 21:39:44 -0500, Ian Cottrell wrote:
    > Jim Bianchi wrote in
    > news:slrng5olen.o3q.jimbo@bolt.sonic.net:
    >> On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 18:56:39 -0400, Richard A. Cini wrote:
    >>> All:
    >>> I'm toying with doing a BBS demo for VCFe. I was going to use a
    >>> Windows
    >>> box as the server for classic machines at VCFe to dial into. Based on
    >>> something Herb told me, I decided that a more authentic BBS
    >>> experience might be had if I could put it together using CP/M and an
    >>> S100 crate. So, I decided to probe my WC-CDROM archive and I actually
    >>> came up with a few BBS systems.
    >>>
    >>> Not knowing much about them, I wanted to throw this open for
    >>> comment.
    >>> There are a few different ones in the archive: Citadel, RBBS, MBBS,
    >>> and QBBS, among a few which are compiled MBASIC-based BBSes and some
    >>> that I donšt remember the name right now.
    >>>
    >>> I havenšt de-LBRed all of these yet to get at the documents but I
    >>> wondered if anyone had a recommendation based on these names.

    >>
    >> As I recall, MBBS was an extremely early BBS system (not to be
    >> confused with MBBS which was a commercial, for-pay only, multi line,
    >> subscription BBS system). MBBS. RBBS, QBBS, and HBBS were all compiled
    >> 8080/z80 assy pgms. as were most of the other CP/M based BBS systems.
    >> They also depended on another pgm called BYEx.COM (I b'lieve the last
    >> version was BYE51O.COM) which provided the ..ah, interface, between
    >> the BBS pgm itself and CP/M. You edited a file (BYE5.ASM) to account
    >> for the makeup of your computer and BBS system and your choices as
    >> sysop, them compiled it and dropped your choice of BBS in on top of
    >> it. HBBS was a massively cleaned up version of the original MBBS and
    >> was written by the late Irv Hoff. If you can get it, it's by far the
    >> smoothest and fastest running of all the xBBS varients.

    >
    > Just to correct Jim slightly, HBBS was a modified (and highly
    > personalized) version of PBBS. Irv and I had several high-octane
    > disagreements about the future directions for PBBS (for which Irv
    > was a beta tester and contributor). So, Irv decided to go his own
    > way and added everything that HE wanted into the source for PBBS,
    > renamed it and released it as HBBS.
    >
    > I would, of course, be remiss if I didn't recommend PBBS for your
    > project. In MY opinion, it has everything that you would need. (=:
    >
    > Ian (author, PBBS)


    So it's all YOUR fault, eh? [grin] Seriously, I'd forgotten the name
    'PBBS' when I wrote about HBBS (and Irv Hoff), but that's what I meant all
    right. And yeah, for a smiple CP/M BBS on, say, an S100 box, PBBS would be
    ideal (either that or HBBS).

    --
    jimbo@sonic.net
    Linux: gawk, date, finger, wait, unzip, touch, nice, suck, strip, mount,
    fsck, umount, make clean, sleep. (Who needs porn when you have /usr/bin?)

  13. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Richard A. Cini ha scritto:
    > All:
    >
    > I'm toying with doing a BBS demo for VCFe. I was going to use a Windows
    > box as the server for classic machines at VCFe to dial into. Based on
    > something Herb told me, I decided that a more authentic BBS experience might
    > be had if I could put it together using CP/M and an S100 crate. So, I
    > decided to probe my WC-CDROM archive and I actually came up with a few BBS
    > systems.
    >
    > Not knowing much about them, I wanted to throw this open for comment.
    > There are a few different ones in the archive: Citadel, RBBS, MBBS, and
    > QBBS, among a few which are compiled MBASIC-based BBSes and some that I
    > donšt remember the name right now.
    >
    > I havenšt de-LBRed all of these yet to get at the documents but I
    > wondered if anyone had a recommendation based on these names.


    ISTR that the very first BBS (Christensen's CBBS) was actually on a CPM
    system, circa 1980, and, hope not to be really wrong, that I have find
    the actual BASIC code of it (from where spawn all the other BBS & BBS
    systems) in some CD-ROM (perhaps the CPM CD-Rom from WC ?)

    Best regards from Italy,
    Dott. Piergiorgio M. d' Errico.

  14. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Jim Bianchi wrote in
    news:slrng5qlbn.p1r.jimbo@bolt.sonic.net:

    >
    > So it's all YOUR fault, eh? [grin] Seriously, I'd forgotten the
    > name
    > 'PBBS' when I wrote about HBBS (and Irv Hoff), but that's what I meant
    > all right. And yeah, for a smiple CP/M BBS on, say, an S100 box, PBBS
    > would be ideal (either that or HBBS).
    >


    Shame on you, Jim! I seem to recall that some of your suggestions were
    incorporated into PBBS. A tremendous number of CP/Mers were involved in
    the development of PBBS over the years, including the aforementioned
    Howard Goldstein, who used to dictate code changes and fixes to me over the
    phone! Those were fun days! I made many good friends (and a few enemies)
    as we developed and enhanced the code. The 'discussions' with the likes
    of Irv Hoff and Dick Roberts were legendary. Oh, my aching phone bill!

    I have promised Hal Bower that I will gather together all of the PBBS
    code and documentation and make it available on his system. One of these
    days...

    Ian

  15. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    > Howard Goldstein is still around and still in New Haven. He's a good
    > friend and we exchange emails and visits pretty regularly. The fellow
    > Dennis Boone is talking about is not Howard. Howard (has just told me
    > that he) had nothing to do with COMMO nor did he use the Michigan
    > Relay System. He is blind and is able to hear with a hearing aid which
    > is probably why you thought of him when Dennis described him.


    MacroBBS was written by Jeff Oberle of Lansing, Michigan. {COMMO}
    was written by Fred Brucker of Columbus, Ohio. I was unaware Fred
    was blind, but it makes sense that Jeff would have been using {COMMO}
    if Fred designed it to be friendly to blind users.

    I dug up links to these packages:

    http://www.filegate.net/comm/commo75.zip
    ftp://ftp.simtel.net/pub/simtelnet/msdos/bbs/mbbs35.zip

    De

  16. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 21:59:14 -0500, Ian Cottrell wrote:
    > Jim Bianchi wrote in
    > news:slrng5qlbn.p1r.jimbo@bolt.sonic.net:
    >
    >>
    >> So it's all YOUR fault, eh? [grin] Seriously, I'd forgotten the
    >> name
    >> 'PBBS' when I wrote about HBBS (and Irv Hoff), but that's what I meant
    >> all right. And yeah, for a smiple CP/M BBS on, say, an S100 box, PBBS
    >> would be ideal (either that or HBBS).
    >>

    >
    > Shame on you, Jim! I seem to recall that some of your suggestions were
    > incorporated into PBBS. A tremendous number of CP/Mers were involved in
    > the development of PBBS over the years, including the aforementioned
    > Howard Goldstein, who used to dictate code changes and fixes to me over the
    > phone! Those were fun days! I made many good friends (and a few enemies)
    > as we developed and enhanced the code. The 'discussions' with the likes
    > of Irv Hoff and Dick Roberts were legendary. Oh, my aching phone bill!


    Heh. Well, as I recall, there weren't all that many systems that
    used HBBS, whereas PBBS was mostly everywhere.

    > I have promised Hal Bower that I will gather together all of the PBBS
    > code and documentation and make it available on his system. One of these
    > days...


    My problem with any BBS software that used BYExx was that often, the
    options in both ASM files would affect the same thing. Such that someone who
    wasn't BBS literate (as I wasn't) could easily set the two to act contrary
    to each other without knowing what they'd done. And the thing either would
    not run at all, or would do weird stuff like log a caller off immediately he
    entered his p/w or something equally bizarre.

    I had a BIG problem with Irv Hoffs version of IMP for instance. The
    dialing directory was a thing of beauty. Only no one ever showed (or told)
    me how to 'put it into the IMPXX.COM file.' I used to (somewhat painfully)
    edit it in manually (geeze -- all them dots!). Ditto the machine specific
    inserts. Once it was all together, though, it was THE ONLY term pgm to use
    on a CP/M system.

    Those were the days. I really miss the dial-up BBS experience. And
    the days when really taut code was passed around in .LBR files.

    --
    jimbo@sonic.net
    Linux: gawk, date, finger, wait, unzip, touch, nice, suck, strip, mount,
    fsck, umount, make clean, sleep. (Who needs porn when you have /usr/bin?)

  17. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 22:38:55 -0500, Dennis Boone wrote:
    > > Howard Goldstein is still around and still in New Haven. He's a good
    > > friend and we exchange emails and visits pretty regularly. The fellow
    > > Dennis Boone is talking about is not Howard. Howard (has just told me
    > > that he) had nothing to do with COMMO nor did he use the Michigan
    > > Relay System. He is blind and is able to hear with a hearing aid which
    > > is probably why you thought of him when Dennis described him.

    >
    > MacroBBS was written by Jeff Oberle of Lansing, Michigan. {COMMO}
    > was written by Fred Brucker of Columbus, Ohio. I was unaware Fred
    > was blind, but it makes sense that Jeff would have been using {COMMO}
    > if Fred designed it to be friendly to blind users.


    Nope. Fred Brucker was NOT blind (at least not when he was into
    writing and supporting {COMMO}). I met him one day just before he moved from
    Santa Rosa, Calif to another state (Ohio). However, {COMMO} WAS exceedingly
    friendly to blind users. Just not stupid users (like me).

    Re: MacroBBS, one of the things that made me switch to Maximus was
    the username/password list. There was no provision for any kind of 'look-up'
    table in {COMMO}, so the search times tended to grow longer as more and more
    users were registered. After about a year of this, my user list grew so long
    that it'd take a significantly long time to resolve a username/password.

    Other than that, it was a superb effort by Jeff Oberle to
    demonstrate the versatility of {COMMO}.

    > I dug up links to these packages:
    >
    > http://www.filegate.net/comm/commo75.zip
    > ftp://ftp.simtel.net/pub/simtelnet/msdos/bbs/mbbs35.zip


    --
    jimbo@sonic.net
    Linux: gawk, date, finger, wait, unzip, touch, nice, suck, strip, mount,
    fsck, umount, make clean, sleep. (Who needs porn when you have /usr/bin?)

  18. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    "dott.Piergiorgio" wrote:
    >

    .... snip ..
    >
    > ISTR that the very first BBS (Christensen's CBBS) was actually on
    > a CPM system, circa 1980, and, hope not to be really wrong, that
    > I have find the actual BASIC code of it (from where spawn all the
    > other BBS & BBS systems) in some CD-ROM (perhaps the CPM CD-Rom
    > from WC ?)


    I believe it was much earlier, and written in assembly. Most CP/M
    system code was.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  19. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    Jim Bianchi wrote in
    news:slrng5rndj.1oe.jimbo@bolt.sonic.net:

    > Those were the days. I really miss the dial-up BBS experience.
    > And
    > the days when really taut code was passed around in .LBR files.
    >

    Me, too, Jim. It was a great time to be alive. And PBBS beta testers
    got .dif files to apply to their master source code. It was a lot
    smaller than re-shipping all the source each time. And I was contantly
    getting e-mails (and snail mail) that said "Hey, I eliminated 12 bytes
    out of such and such a routine in PBBS!" And all those 12 byte savings
    soon added up to enough room to add new features. The entire (threaded)
    PBBS system ran in 24K! It truely was fun!

    Ian


  20. Re: CP/M BBS Systems

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 03:23:36 +0200, "dott.Piergiorgio"
    wrote:


    >ISTR that the very first BBS (Christensen's CBBS) was actually on a CPM
    >system, circa 1980, and, hope not to be really wrong, that I have find
    >the actual BASIC code of it


    Christensen wrote in assembler, not basic.

    Try 1977-1978 for a time frame

    There was an article in Byte about that first system

    Bill

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