Concurrent CP/M BACK and REST - CP/M

This is a discussion on Concurrent CP/M BACK and REST - CP/M ; I have seen that all the messages published so far about my hard disk failure deal with MS-DOS. My goal is to keep using CP/M Plus, despite the hardware of the IBM Clown. So, I am trying to improve CP/M-86 ...

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Thread: Concurrent CP/M BACK and REST

  1. Concurrent CP/M BACK and REST

    I have seen that all the messages published so far about my hard disk
    failure deal with MS-DOS.

    My goal is to keep using CP/M Plus, despite the hardware of the IBM
    Clown.

    So, I am trying to improve CP/M-86 Plus, the 8086 version of CP/M Plus,
    which is a single-user version of Concurrent CP/M 3.1. (To do my work,
    and to write to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup, I use a portable under
    DR-DOS 7.03. This is the one which HD failed.)

    This Concurrent CP/M 3.1 happens to be delivered with 2 utilities, BACK
    and REST(ORE), used to make back-ups of hard disks.

    Unfortunately, the only version known of Concurrent CP/M 3.1 needs a
    Starlink 4-ports card to boot, and nobody has been able, so far, to
    remove the DR Net stuff from the SYS file. So, I have never been able
    to use the multi-tasking, multi-user version.

    I happens to have the book containing the Concurrent PC-DOS 3.2 (which
    adds MS-DOS V2 compatibility). Again, as far as I know, nobody has been
    able to boot from it. (When I use TeleDisk to recreate a boot disk, I
    get a "Cannot find CPM.SYS or CCPM.SYS"... When I examine the disk with
    22DISK, I see a SYS file, but 22DISK reports that it has bad blocks.
    When I erased this SYS file and put another on the floppy, it still
    does not boot. --> So, I cannot boot from it, and make another floppy,
    or format a hard disk, or use BACK and REST.)

    Since I have the "User's Guide" of Concurrent PC-DOS 3.2, I would
    prefer to use it, but has anybody else been able to boot another
    version of Concurrent able to run CMD files? Have you used BACK and
    REST? (By the way, are they still available under DR-DOS? I could not
    find them on-line on the DR DOS Web site mentioned yesterday.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"


  2. BACK and REST Documentation

    BACKREST.WS4
    ------------

    BackRest Hard-disk Backup and Restore Program

    (Edited by Emmanuel ROCHE.)


    ************************************************** *************
    Copyright (C) 1984 Digital Research Inc.

    Stok Software is the author of the BackRest program which has
    been specially configured to fulfill the backup requirements
    for the file system of this Concurrent operating system. This
    version of BackRest has been licensed for distribution by
    Digital Research (R) by written agreement with Stok Software,
    Inc.

    CP/M and Digital Research and its logo are registered
    trademarks of Digital Research Inc. Concurrent is a trademark
    of Digital Research Inc. BackRest is a trademark of Stok
    Software, Inc.
    ************************************************** *************


    This file describes the operation and use of the Concurrent
    (TM) hard-disk backup and restore program, BackRest (TM).


    WHAT IS BACKREST?
    -----------------

    BackRest is a file maintenance program that gives you a safe,
    convenient method for selectively copying your files from
    Concurrent hard-disk partitions to floppy disks. BackRest's
    restore facility allows you to specify which files you want
    restored from backup disks to your hard disk.

    BackRest identifies each of your backup disks with a unique
    volume number and maintains report and directory files that
    indicate the location and date of backup for each of the files
    it copies.

    You should back up your hard-disk files on a regular basis.
    Doing so ensures that you have fairly up-to-date copies in case
    your hard disk is accidentally erased or damaged. BackRest
    makes it easy to protect your files because it backs up only
    those files which have been created or modified since the last
    backup.


    BACKREST FUNCTIONS
    ------------------

    BackRest lets you select which files you want backed up and
    restored. Files may be selected according to subdirectory,
    user number, filename, file extension, and hard-disk partition.
    You can also tell BackRest to delete certain files after they
    have been backed up (file migration). See "How to Tell
    BackRest What You Want."

    BackRest accepts either CP/M (R) or DOS media in your source
    (hard-disk) and destination (floppy-disk) drives. The source
    drive is the drive from which a file is copied; the destination
    drive contains the disk on which the copy is placed. BackRest
    can determine what type of file it is backing up and requests
    that you place the appropriately formatted disk in the
    destination drive.

    If a hard-disk file is too large to fit on one backup disk,
    BackRest can split the file and copy it to two or more disks.
    BackRest then merges these file parts when asked to restore the
    original file.

    You can restore a file by the date it was backed up. You can
    restore a particular group of files by giving BackRest an
    ambiguous file specification.

    You can also restore bad files automatically. BackRest
    considers a file "bad" if it is unable to copy the file (due to
    a source media sector error, for example) to a backup disk.
    When you select this option, BackRest locates the previously
    backed up copy of the file and restores it to your hard disk.
    See "REST" in "BackRest Commands" for more information on file
    restoration.

    BackRest generates reports of its backup and restore
    operations. The reports are divided into four categories:
    Backup, Restore, Hard-disk Statistics, and Errors. "BackRest
    Reports" describes the form and content of each report section.

    Note that you can access BackRest functions through the Backup
    File(s) Menu in Concurrent's File Manager.


    BACKREST FILES
    --------------

    To perform its backup and restore operations, BackRest needs
    three files: BACK.CMD, REST.CMD, and CONTROL.BR. These files
    must be on the disk in the current drive or on the drive from
    which you enter a BackRest command.

    BACK.CMD and REST.CMD are BackRest command files. They
    correspond to the BACK and REST commands described in "BackRest
    Commands."

    CONTROL.BR is BackRest's control file. It contains records
    that control the operation of BACK and REST. If CONTROL.BR is
    not on the disk in the current drive, neither BACK nor REST
    will perform. CONTROL.BR has already been set up for use on
    most personal computers that run Concurrent.

    You can edit the records in CONTROL.BR to suit your particular
    requirements and computer system. Be sure to make a copy of
    CONTROL.BR before you modify it. Do not modify the original
    file from your Concurrent distribution disk.

    As BackRest processes your commands to back up files, it
    creates permanent work files on the hard disk. All work files
    created by BackRest have a .BR file extension. BackRest
    creates three kinds of work files: a directory file, a path
    file and a report file. The directory file appears on your
    disk as DIR.BR. BackRest uses DIR.BR to keep track of the
    files it has copied to specific backup disks. The path file,
    which appears as PATHS.BR, is used by BackRest to record all
    the path names encountered during a backup session. The report
    files, REPORT.BR and RESTRPT.BR, contain information on backup
    and restore operations.

    BackRest also creates files with an extension of BR@. These
    files are temporary work files. Do not erase, rename, or set
    any "BR" file to Read-Only and do not use the BR extension when
    naming your own files.


    HOW BACKREST ORGANIZES YOUR FILES
    ---------------------------------

    Factors that affect a particular session can include: date of
    backup, source and destination drives, filenames and
    extensions, user numbers, subdirectories, and file media type.
    It is important that you understand how BackRest handles such
    "variables" during its backup and restore operations. This
    section describes the methods BackRest uses to organize and
    locate the files it copies to your backup disks.


    Disk Volume Numbers
    -------------------

    BackRest assigns a unique volume number to each disk it uses as
    a backup disk. Volume numbers are assigned sequentially,
    beginning with the first time you use BACK. Before your files
    are copied from a Concurrent hard-disk partition, BackRest
    writes a volume number file on the backup disk. Backup disk
    volume number files have filenames and extensions similar to
    the example shown below:

    -C-00001.VOL

    The second character of the example indicates which hard disk
    (C) was used as the source drive. The remaining portion of the
    filename is the backup disk volume number; the example shows
    the number (00001) for the first backup disk containing files
    copied from hard-disk drive C. All volume number files have
    the VOL extension.

    BackRest keeps track of your backup disks by the volume number
    it assigns to each one. BackRest asks you to label each of
    your backup disks with the volume number it displays. When you
    need to restore a specific file to your hard disk, BackRest
    requests a specific backup disk by its volume number.

    BackRest's directory files are its key in matching volume
    numbers to backed up files. When you request the restoration
    of a specific file, BackRest searches for that file
    specification in DIR.BR. DIR.BR indicates the names of all the
    backed up files and the location of each by volume number.


    BackRest Directory Files
    ------------------------

    BackRest keeps a record of all the files it has backed up in a
    file named DIR.BR. DIR.BR contains the name of each file
    backed up, the date it was backed up, and its backup disk
    volume number. As BackRest performs subsequent backups, it
    adds the current date, new filenames, and backup disk volume
    numbers to DIR.BR.

    When you request the restoration of a specific file, BackRest
    searches for its filespec in DIR.BR. If you request a file by
    backup date, BackRest reads DIR.BR until it finds a date that
    matches the one you have specified. Using the date as an
    index, BackRest reads the list of files in DIR.BR. When
    BackRest finds the matching filename in DIR.BR, it reads the
    volume number associated with the filename and asks that you
    place the backup disk with that volume number in the correct
    drive.

    BackRest writes DIR.BR to the disk in the control drive and
    automatically copies it to the last backup disk used in a
    backup session. The control drive is the drive you tell
    BackRest to use as its system work drive. See the CONTROL
    DRIVE: record in "Control Records."

    If DIR.BR is removed from the control drive, backup disk volume
    numbering begins again, starting from 00001. To avoid volume
    number repetition, never erase DIR.BR from your hard disk. If
    DIR.BR does become accidentally erased, use the COPY command to
    replace it with a copy of DIR.BR from your last backup disk.
    Never use any other copy of DIR.BR for this purpose.


    CP/M Files: User Numbers and Passwords
    --------------------------------------

    BackRest can operate on the CP/M files you have organized by
    user numbers and protected with passwords. The CONTROL.BR file
    contains a record you can modify to tell BackRest which user
    numbers you want backed up. BackRest can then copy files fromW
    your CP/M hard-disk partition into the corresponding user
    numbers on the backup disk.

    BackRest records every user number it has backed up in the
    REPORT.BR file. Printed reports indicate CP/M files by drive,
    user number, and backup disk volume number.

    The CP/M files you protect with passwords are backed up and
    restored when you specify the passwords in the CONTROL.BR
    Exception Records. It is important that you also password-
    protect CONTROL.BR if it contains passwords for other files
    from your hard-disk drives. BackRest uses a default password
    for this purpose. See "Exception Records."

    Note: BackRest does not password-protect the files it writes
    to backup disks. If you use BackRest with password-protected
    files, store your backup disks in a secure area.


    DOS Files: Subdirectories and Paths
    -----------------------------------

    DOS subdirectories provide a useful way to separate and
    organize your files. If you use subdirectories on your DOS
    hard-disk partition, BackRest can store your files under the
    same subdirectories on your DOS media backup disks. When your
    DOS files are restored to your hard disk, BackRest returns them
    to the same subdirectories from which they were originally
    copied.

    The REPORT.BR file records every subdirectory backed up.
    Printed reports indicate DOS files by drive, backup disk volume
    number, and path.

    Subdirectory paths to your files can be passed to BackRest
    through the File Manager (see the Backup File(s) Menu in
    Section 2, "File Manager" of the Concurrent PC DOS User's
    Guide). You can also indicate the subdirectories you want
    backed up and restored with the PATH: record in "Control
    Records."


    SETTING UP BACKREST
    -------------------

    Before you can use BackRest, you must copy three files to your
    system drive. These files are: BACK.CMD, CONTROL.BR, and
    REST.CMD. BACK.CMD and REST.CMD are the command files used to
    back up and restore your hard-disk files; CONTROL.BR is
    described later in this section. Use the PIP command to copy
    BACK.CMD, REST.CMD, and CONTROL.BR from your distribution disk
    to your system disk. See "Drives" in Section 1 of the
    Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide to determine the system drive
    for your computer. The following example is for a Personal
    Computer XT with one floppy-disk drive (A and one hard-disk
    divided into two partitions, DOS (C, and CP/M (D; in this
    case, drive D is the system drive.

    A>PIP D:=BACK.CMD[OV]
    A>PIP D:=REST.CMD[OV]
    A>PIP D:=CONTROL.BR[OV]

    The BackRest control file, CONTROL.BR, contains records that
    dictate how BackRest performs its backup and restore
    operations.

    It controls how BackRest displays its messages on your screen;
    whether reports are printed; which user numbers and
    subdirectories are used; source and destination drive
    assignments; and which files are backed up, deleted, restored,
    or ignored.


    What BackRest Needs to Know
    ---------------------------

    The records in CONTROL.BR provide BackRest with information it
    needs to run its backup and restore operations. If a record
    that contains information vital to BackRest is missing from the
    control file, or if a record's information is incorrectly
    formatted, BackRest displays an error message indicating the
    missing or incorrect record.

    Control file records are divided into five categories:

    1) Screen Control Records
    2) Printer Information Records
    3) Report Records
    4) Control Records
    5) Exception Records

    Screen Control Records contain codes that enable BackRest to
    clear your computer's screen and display messages in different
    colors. Printer Information Records tell BackRest about your
    printer. Report Records control report content, report
    headings, and whether reports are printed automatically.
    Control Records provide important parameters of BackRest's
    operation, such as source and destination drives. Exception
    Records tell BackRest which files to treat as exceptions to the
    general backup procedures stated in the control records.

    All control file records consist of a descriptor and one or
    more fields. A record descriptor is a one- or two-word label,
    ending in a colon, that describes the purpose of the record.
    For example,

    DEST DRIVE:

    is the descriptor for the Control Record that defines the
    backup disk destination drive.

    The descriptor is followed by one or more fields. A field
    defines a value for the record. Screen Control and Printer
    Information record fields are made up of decimal numbers. The
    first number for these fields is called a length field. The
    length field tells BackRest how many numbers make up the second
    field, called the code field. The following example shows the
    descriptor and fields for the CLEAR: Screen Control Record:

    CLEAR: 2,27,69

    The length field has a value of 2 because the code field is
    composed of two numbers (27,69). Notice that the numbers for
    both the length and code fields are delimited by a comma and
    that spaces may be used freely in CONTROL.BR. BackRest sends
    the code 27,69 to your computer so that it clears the screen.

    Fields for other control file records can consist of a "true"
    or "false" value, a drive specifier, or an actual number to be
    used as follows:

    REPORT PRINT: true
    DEST DRIVE: a
    USERS: 0,1,2

    "How to Tell BackRest What You Want" describes the purpose and
    specific form of each control file record by category. The
    CONTROL.BR file is shown in Listing B-1.

    Listing 1. BackRest CONTROL.BR File

    * This is the CONTROL.BR file that tells BackRest how to operate
    * on your CP/M and DOS files under Concurrent.
    * This control file is for a personal computer with a color screen
    * and standard (80 column) printer.
    * See "Setting Up BackRest" in BACKREST.DOC of the Concurrent
    * distribution disk.

    * SCREEN CONTROL RECORDS
    * The CLEAR: record contains the code used to erase the screen.
    * The seven ATTRIBUTE: records determine the colors BackRest will
    * use to display its messages.

    CLEAR: 2,27,69
    ATTRIBUTE: start screen: 9,27,99,0,27,97,3,27,98,2 <-- Green
    ATTRIBUTE: leave screen: 3,27,98,7 <-- Grey
    ATTRIBUTE: general: 3,27,98,2 <-- Green
    ATTRIBUTE: errors: 3,27,98,15 <-- White
    ATTRIBUTE: message: 3,27,98,14 <-- Yellow
    ATTRIBUTE: data: 3,27,98,3 <-- Cyan
    ATTRIBUTE: input: 3,27,98,12 <-- Red

    * PRINTER INFORMATION RECORDS

    PRINTER INIT: 1,13 <-- Start with a carriage return.
    FORMFEED: 1,12 <-- Printer code for a form feed.
    LENGTH: 60 <-- Number of lines per page.
    WIDTH: 80 <-- Number of columns per page.

    * REPORT RECORDS
    * Change the "ID:" record field to the heading you want BackRest
    * to print on its reports.

    REPORT PRINT: true <-- Print report when finished.
    SHOW SKIPS: true <-- Report on files not backed up.
    ID: Concurrent PC DOS Hard Disk Backup

    * CONTROL RECORDS
    * The following records control backup and restore operations.

    SPLIT: true <-- Divide backup files if required.
    BELL REPEAT: false <-- Set to "true" for repeating bell
    prompt.
    DEST DRIVE: a <-- Backup disk drive.
    SOURCE: c,d <-- Hard disk drives to be backed up.
    CONTROL DRIVE: c <-- BackRest system work drive.
    VERIFY: true <-- Verify each file by
    read-after-write.
    REUSE: false <-- Do not reuse backup disks.
    ERASE: true <-- Always erase destination disk
    first.
    * Backup and restore the following user numbers on CP/M media:
    USERS: 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15

    * EXCEPTION RECORDS
    * Least ambiguous exceptions must appear first.
    * DO NOT REMOVE THE FIRST TWO EXCEPTIONS.
    * Only the DOS files that reside in the subdirectories declared
    * by a preceding PATH: record will be affected by an exception
    * with "D" in the first field.
    * Five fields are mandatory for exception records. These are:
    *
    * 1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5
    * user,drive,process flag,d(elete) or k(eep),filename.extension
    *
    * Use "D" in the first field for DOS files.
    * A sixth field, password, may be added for CP/M files.

    PATH: c:\ <-- Subdirectories to backup and
    restore.

    EXC: ?,?,c,k,control?.br <-- Backup control files if modified.
    EXC: ?,?,n,k,*.br? <-- Do not backup .BR files.
    EXC: ?,?,n,d,*.bak <-- Delete .BAK files.
    EXC: ?,?,n,d,*.$$$ <-- Delete .$$$ files.

    * End of CONTROL.BR


    How to Tell BackRest What You Want
    ----------------------------------

    The control records have already been configured for most
    personal computers that run Concurrent. However, you might
    want to change them so that BackRest performs according to your
    particular requirements. If you do, make a working copy of
    CONTROL.BR and modify it using a text editor such as DR EDIX or
    any other text editor or word-processing program. Please read
    the descriptions of the control file records carefully before
    you change anything in CONTROL.BR.

    The description of each record includes what the record does,
    its form, an explanation of the form, whether the record's
    presence in the control file is mandatory, and an example.

    Note that BackRest operations can be accessed through
    Concurrent's File Manager. See "Backup File(s) Menu" in
    Section 2 of the Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide.


    Screen Control Records
    ----------------------

    Two records, CLEAR: and ATTRIBUTE:, control how BackRest uses
    the screen of your computer.


    CLEAR:
    ------

    BackRest reads the CLEAR: record to obtain the code for
    clearing the screen of your computer.

    Form
    CLEAR: length,code

    Explanation
    The CLEAR: record must contain two fields, the length field and
    the code field. The length field specifies the number of
    characters in the code required to clear the screen. The code
    field contains the decimal values that your computer uses to
    erase all characters currently being displayed on the screen.

    The CLEAR: record's presence in CONTROL.BR is optional. If you
    remove CLEAR: from the control file, BackRest clears the screen
    by sending it 24 blank lines.

    Example
    CLEAR: 2,27,69

    This example shows that two decimal numbers (2,) are required
    for the code (27,69) that clears the screen. This is the
    correct code for personal computers that run BackRest under
    Concurrent.


    ATTRIBUTE:
    ----------

    If your computer has a color monitor, you can use the
    ATTRIBUTE: record to specify the colors BackRest should use for
    displaying its messages on your screen.

    Form
    ATTRIBUTE: type: length,code

    Explanation
    The ATTRIBUTE: record uses three fields, type:, length, and
    code.

    There are seven type: fields for ATTRIBUTE: records:

    1) start screen: Initialize the screen at the beginning of a
    backup or restore session.

    2) leave screen: Set screen state at the end of a backup or
    restore session.

    3) general: Set BackRest sign-on color.

    4) errors: Set color for error messages.

    5) message: Set color for BackRest messages.

    6) data: Set color for display information.

    7) input: Set color for your input to BackRest.

    The length field specifies the number of characters required
    for the color code.

    The code field is the code for the color your computer uses on
    the screen. This field consists of a series of decimal
    numbers, each separated by a comma.

    Table B-1 shows the ATTRIBUTE: length field and code field
    values for several colors.

    Table 1. ATTRIBUTE: Color Codes

    Length Code
    Color Field Field
    ------ ----- -------
    Blue 3, 27,98,1
    Brown 3, 27,98,6
    Cyan 3, 27,98,3
    Red 3, 27,98,4
    Green 3, 27,98,2
    Grey 3, 27,98,7
    Light Cyan 3, 27,98,11
    Magenta 3, 27,98,13
    White 3, 27,98,15
    Yellow 3, 27,98,14

    ATTRIBUTE: records are optional. When ATTRIBUTE: records are
    not included in the control file, BackRest uses monochrome
    screen displays.

    Example
    ATTRIBUTE: errors: 3,27,98,4

    This ATTRIBUTE: record causes all BackRest error messages to be
    displayed in red.


    Printer Information Records
    ---------------------------

    Four control file records provide BackRest with information
    about your printer: PRINTER INIT:, FORMFEED:, LENGTH:, and
    WIDTH:.


    PRINTER INIT:
    -------------

    The PRINTER INIT: record sends a start-up command to your
    printer.

    Form
    PRINTER INIT: length,command code

    Explanation
    Before BackRest sends its reports to your printer, it reads
    this record to determine which command should precede printer
    output. PRINTER INIT: has two fields, length and command code.
    The length field specifies the number of decimal characters
    that make up the command code. The command code is a series of
    numbers that your computer sends to your printer for functions
    such as compressed print mode, carriage return, or line feed.

    PRINTER INIT: is an optional record. If you remove PRINTER
    INIT: from the control file, BackRest uses a default command
    that causes your printer to perform one carriage return.

    Example
    PRINTER INIT: 2,12,13

    This PRINTER INIT: record causes your printer to perform a form
    feed (12) and carriage return (13) before BackRest's reports
    are printed.


    FORMFEED:
    ---------
    BackRest uses the FORMFEED: record to begin printing a section
    of its reports on a new page.

    Form
    FORMFEED: length,command code

    Explanation
    The FORMFEED: record consists of two fields, length and command
    code. Both fields are made up of decimal values.

    The FORMFEED: record is optional. BackRest uses three linefeed
    commands if this record is not included in CONTROL.BR.

    Example
    FORMFEED: 1,12

    The length field is 1 because the command code consists of one
    number. The command code for a printer form feed on most
    computers that run Concurrent is 12.


    LENGTH:
    -------

    The LENGTH: record specifies the number of lines to be printed
    per BackRest report page.

    Form
    LENGTH: number of lines

    Explanation
    The LENGTH: record has only one field, a decimal value for the
    number of lines to be printed per report page.

    LENGTH: is an optional record. If you remove this record from
    CONTROL.BR, BackRest uses a default value of 60 lines per page.

    Example
    LENGTH: 65

    This LENGTH: record tells BackRest to print 65 lines per report
    page.


    WIDTH:
    ------

    The WIDTH: record tells BackRest the number of columns per page
    that your printer accommodates.

    Form
    WIDTH: number of columns

    Explanation
    The only field the WIDTH: record uses is a decimal value for
    the number of columns your printer allows.

    The WIDTH: record must be included in the control file. If
    WIDTH: is missing from CONTROL.BR, BackRest displays the
    following error message and returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Incomplete control file

    Example
    WIDTH: 80

    This record tells your printer to print 80 columns per page,
    the standard for most personal computer printers. If your
    printer can print 120 columns per page, you might want to
    change the WIDTH: field to 120.


    Report Records
    --------------

    BackRest uses three control file records for its reports. These
    are: REPORT PRINT:, SHOW SKIPS:, and ID:.


    REPORT PRINT:
    -------------

    Use the REPORT PRINT: record to control whether BackRest
    automatically prints its reports at the end of backup or
    restore operations.

    Form
    REPORT PRINT: true/false

    Explanation
    The REPORT PRINT: field can have either a "true" or "false"
    value. If the field is "true," BackRest automatically sends
    its reports to your printer. If you set the REPORT PRINT:
    field to "false," BackRest does not send its reports to your
    printer. If there is no printer attached to your computer, set
    this field to "false."

    You can tell BackRest to send its reports to your printer at
    any time by issuing one of the following commands:

    A>BACK REPORT

    for the backup report, or

    A>REST REPORT

    for the restore report. Please see "BackRest Commands" for
    more information about these commands.

    REPORT PRINT: is an optional record. If you remove this record
    from the control file, BackRest uses "true" for a default field
    value.

    Example
    REPORT PRINT: true

    This example REPORT PRINT: record causes BackRest to send its
    reports to the printer automatically.


    SHOW SKIPS:
    -----------

    The SHOW SKIPS: record determines whether BackRest includes a
    report of the files excluded from a hard-disk backup.

    Form
    SHOW SKIPS: true/false

    Explanation
    The SHOW SKIPS: record uses a one-word field of either "true"
    or "false." If you set the field to "true," BackRest includes
    the "Files Skipped" section in its backup report (see "Backup
    Reports"). Because this section of the report can be quite
    long, you might want to set the SHOW SKIPS: field to "false."
    BackRest always includes the "Files Skipped" section in a
    backup report if you specify a complete hard-disk backup as
    described in "BackRest Commands."

    SHOW SKIPS: is an optional record. If you remove SHOW SKIPS:
    from the control file, BackRest uses "true" for a default field
    value.

    Example
    SHOW SKIPS: false

    The report of files excluded from a hard-disk backup session
    are not printed unless you specify a complete backup.


    ID:
    ---

    Use the ID: record to specify the heading BackRest prints on
    all pages of its reports.

    Form
    ID: heading

    Explanation
    The field for the ID: record is the heading you want printed on
    each page of BackRest reports. If you are using an 80-column
    printer, use a maximum of 30 characters. This limits the
    heading to a single line. In any case, do not use more than 60
    characters.

    The ID: record must be included in the control file. If ID: is
    missing from CONTROL.BR:, BackRest displays the following error
    message and then returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Incomplete control file

    Example
    ID: Pacific Grove Dental Clinic

    This ID: record causes BackRest to print the following heading
    on each page of its reports:

    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84


    Control Records
    ---------------

    The Control Records contain information that governs important
    aspects of BackRest's operation. The control records are:
    SPLIT:, BELL REPEAT:, DEST DRIVE:, SOURCE:, CONTROL DRIVE:,
    VERIFY:, REUSE:, ERASE:, USERS:, and PATH:.


    SPLIT:
    ------

    The SPLIT: record controls whether a file too large to fit in
    the space remaining on a disk is to be divided onto two or more
    disks during backup.

    Form
    SPLIT: true/false

    Explanation
    The SPLIT: record field can have either a "true" or "false"
    value. If the field is "true," BackRest copies as much of the
    file as will fit in the disk's remaining space; the rest of the
    file is then copied to the next backup disk. BackRest joins
    the two files during restoration. A field value of "false"
    causes BackRest to request a new backup disk if the current
    disk's remaining space cannot accommodate the file. Note that
    a value of "true" uses a disk's space completely and requires
    fewer disks per backup session.

    SPLIT: is an optional record. BackRest uses "false" as the
    default field value if you remove SPLIT: from the control file.
    BackRest always divides single files that are larger than the
    capacity of a single blank backup disk despite the SPLIT: field
    setting.

    Example
    SPLIT: true

    This SPLIT: record causes BackRest to divide files between
    disks.


    BELL REPEAT:
    ------------

    The BELL REPEAT: record controls the tone prompt BackRest
    sounds when a message is displayed and your attention is
    required.

    Form
    BELL REPEAT: true/false

    Explanation
    The field for BELL REPEAT: can have either a "true" or "false"
    value. If the field is "true," BackRest sounds the tone
    repeatedly. A "false" value causes BackRest to sound the tone
    just once.

    The BELL REPEAT: record is optional. If you remove BELL
    REPEAT: from the control file, BackRest uses "false" for its
    default field value.

    Example
    BELL REPEAT: false

    BackRest sounds the tone just once when your attention is
    required.


    DEST DRIVE:
    -----------

    Use DEST DRIVE: to specify the backup disk destination drive.

    Form
    DEST DRIVE: d

    Explanation
    The field for DEST DRIVE: is a one-letter designation
    specifying the backup disk drive. BackRest writes copies of
    the files to be backed up on the disk contained in this drive.
    BackRest also reads files from the backup disk in this drive
    during hard-disk file restoration.

    The DEST DRIVE: record must be included in the control file.
    If you remove it, BackRest displays the following error message
    and then returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Incomplete control file

    If you use an invalid drive designation in the DEST DRIVE:
    field, BackRest displays the following error message before
    returning control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Illegal Disk Drive Specified
    DEST DRIVE: d <-- Backup disk drive

    Example
    DEST DRIVE: a

    This example shows that BackRest writes to and reads files from
    floppy disks placed in drive A. The drive you designate in the
    DEST DRIVE: field depends upon the configuration of your
    computer system. See "Drive Designation" in Section 1 of the
    Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide.


    SOURCE:
    -------
    Use the SOURCE: record to specify the hard-disk drives you want
    BackRest to back up and restore.

    Form
    SOURCE: d,d,d,d

    Explanation
    The SOURCE: record field is made up of one-letter hard-disk
    partition designations. The hard-disk partitions specified in
    the SOURCE: field are backed up to the disk drive specified in
    the DEST DRIVE: record.

    The SOURCE: record must be included in the control file. If
    you remove it, BackRest displays the following error message
    and then returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Incomplete control file

    BackRest ignores a SOURCE: drive designation if it is also used
    in the DEST DRIVE: record. In that case, BackRest continues
    processing any valid drive designations that are remaining in
    the SOURCE: field. When BackRest finishes its backup
    operations, it prints the following message in its Error
    Report:

    Warning! Source and destination drive d: were the same,
    skipped it as source.

    When you specify invalid drive designations in the SOURCE:
    record field, BackRest displays the following error message
    before returning control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Illegal Disk Drive Specified
    SOURCE: d,d,d <-- Backup disk drive

    If you change the SOURCE: field, BackRest performs a full hard-
    disk backup during the next backup session.

    Example
    SOURCE: c,d

    This example shows that files will be read from hard-disk
    partitions C and D for backup. The drives you specify in the
    SOURCE: record depend on the configuration of your computer
    system. See "Drive Designation" in Section 1 of the Concurrent
    PC DOS User's Guide.


    CONTROL DRIVE:
    --------------

    Use the CONTROL DRIVE: record to tell BackRest which drive it
    should use as its work drive.

    Form
    CONTROL DRIVE: d

    Explanation
    The field for the CONTROL DRIVE: record is a one-letter
    designation specifying the BackRest system work drive; this is
    the drive on which BackRest stores its DIR.BR, PATHS.BR,
    REPORT.BR, RESTRPT.BR, and temporary work files.

    The CONTROL DRIVE: record must be included in the control file.
    If it is removed, BackRest displays the following error message
    and then returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Incomplete control file

    When an invalid drive designation is used in the CONTROL DRIVE:
    record field, BackRest displays the following error message
    before returning control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Illegal Disk Drive Specified
    CONTROL: d <-- Backup system work drive.

    You cannot specify the same drive in the CONTROL DRIVE: and
    DEST DRIVE: fields. If you do, BackRest displays the following
    error message and then returns control to Concurrent:

    Fatal Error!!
    Control drive matches Destination for Drive d:,
    Aborted backup.

    Example
    CONTROL: c

    This example Control Record tells BackRest to use drive C as
    its system work drive. The drive you assign as BackRest's
    system work drive depends on the configuration of your
    computer. See "Drive Designation" in Section 1 of the
    Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide.


    VERIFY:
    -------

    Use the VERIFY: record to control whether BackRest checks the
    backup files against the original source files for an exact
    match.

    Form
    VERIFY: true/false

    Explanation
    The VERIFY: record field can be either "true" or "false." If
    the field is "true," BackRest performs a read-after-write
    operation to compare the backup file against the original
    source file. If you set the VERIFY: field to "false," BackRest
    will not verify its backup files.

    The VERIFY: record is optional. When VERIFY: is not included in
    the control file, BackRest uses "true" for its default field
    value.

    Example
    VERIFY: true

    This VERIFY record tells BackRest to check every backup file
    against its source file for an exact match.


    REUSE:
    ------

    The REUSE: record specifies whether you want BackRest to reuse
    backup disks.

    Form
    REUSE: true/false[,volume number]

    Explanation
    REUSE: has two fields. The first field can be set to "true" or
    "false." If you set the field to "true," BackRest accepts a
    backup disk that contains previously backed up files. If the
    field is "false," BackRest does not accept a disk that contains
    previously backed up files.

    The second field for REUSE: is the decimal value you want
    BackRest to use as the volume number for the first reused
    backup disk. This field is optional; BackRest will only use it
    if the first field is "true."

    REUSE: is an optional record. If REUSE: is not contained in
    the control file, BackRest uses "false" for its default field
    value.

    Example
    REUSE: true,99

    BackRest accepts a disk that contains previously backed up
    files in response to its prompt for you to insert a new disk.
    BackRest labels the disks used in the current backup session
    beginning with volume number 99.

    BackRest assigns the same volume number (99) to the first
    reused disk in subsequent backup sessions.

    Note: If you set REUSE: to "true," set the ERASE: record to
    "false." This will prevent BackRest from erasing existing
    backup files on the disk to be reused. See the description of
    ERASE: that follows.


    ERASE:
    ------

    Use the ERASE: record to tell BackRest if it is to erase
    destination disks before writing backup files to them.

    Form
    ERASE: true/false

    Explanation
    The ERASE: record field can be either "true" or "false." If
    the field is "true," BackRest erases all the files on the
    destination disks that reside in the user numbers and
    subdirectory paths declared in the USERS: and PATH: records.
    Note, however, that BackRest does not erase any previously
    backed up files from these user numbers or subdirectories if
    the REUSE: record field is "false." In that case, BackRest
    prompts you for a new destination disk. If you want BackRest
    to use the remaining space on a backup disk without erasing any
    existing backup files, set ERASE: to "false" and REUSE: to
    "true." Note: If you set ERASE: to "true" and REUSE: to
    "true," BackRest erases disks before reusing them.

    Example
    ERASE: true

    This record causes BackRest to erase any files in the user
    numbers or subdirectories specified in the USERS: and PATH:
    records from backup destination disks before it copies any
    files. If a disk contains previously backed up files and the
    REUSE: record is "false," BackRest prompts you for another
    backup disk.


    USERS:
    ------

    The USERS: record tells BackRest which CP/M user numbers to
    back up and restore.

    Form
    USERS: n,n,n,. . .

    Explanation
    The field for the USERS: record consists of the user numbers,
    separated by commas, to be backed up and restored. User
    numbers 0 - 15 may be specified in the USERS: field. Your
    backup sessions take less time if you limit this field to only
    those user numbers storing your hard-disk files.

    USERS: is an optional record. If you remove it from the
    control file, BackRest uses user number 0 as its default. If
    you change the USERS: field, BackRest performs a full hard-disk
    backup during the next backup session.

    Example
    USERS: 0,1,4

    This USERS: record causes BackRest to search through user
    numbers 0, 1, and 4 for files to be backed up and restored.


    PATH:
    -----

    Use PATH: to specify the DOS subdirectories that contain files
    you want BackRest to back up and restore.

    Form
    PATH: d:\1st directory\2nd directory\3rd directory\. . .

    Explanation
    The PATH: record field consists of a source drive designation
    (d, the DOS root directory, and the hierarchical sequence of
    directories that leads to the subdirectory containing the files
    to be backed up and restored. Note the required colon after
    the drive designation and the use of backslashes.

    Note: If a subdirectory specified in a PATH: record does not
    exist, BackRest ignores the record.

    When the same subdirectory path exists on two or more drives
    and you want the files in each to be backed up, the control
    file must include separate PATH: records for each drive.

    PATH: records affect only DOS files. DOS files are indicated
    by EXC: records that contain "D" in the first field. Each
    PATH: record specifies only the paths to the files declared in
    the EXC: records that follow it.

    The PATH: and EXC: records must follow all other control file
    records.

    The PATH: record is optional. If it is removed from the
    control file, BackRest backs up only the files in the current
    directory.

    If you are using BackRest from Concurrent's File Manager, you
    are not required to specify subdirectories in the PATH: record.W
    BackRest can accept paths to your DOS files from the File
    Manager (see the Backup File Menu in Section 2, "File Manager"
    of the Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide).

    Example
    PATH: C:\terry\kit\sales

    This PATH: record tells BackRest to back up the DOS files
    contained in subdirectory "SALES" on source drive C as
    specified in any EXC: records that may immediately follow.
    This includes only those EXC: records which use "D" in the
    first field. The subdirectory path declared in this record
    will not be used for EXC: records that come after another PATH:
    record or do not contain "D" in the first field.


    Exception Records
    -----------------

    Exception Records tell BackRest which files it should treat as
    "exceptions" to the more general procedures governed by the
    control records. Without Exception Records, BackRest backs up
    every hard-disk file as declared in the SOURCE:, USER:, and
    PATH: records. An Exception Record's descriptor is EXC:.


    EXC:
    ----

    Use EXC: to tell BackRest the backup process and disposition
    you require for specific files.

    Form
    EXC: user/D,d,process,disposition,filename.ext,[password]

    Explanation
    Exception Records have six fields separated by commas. The
    first field can be a user number or question mark (?) for CP/M
    files, or "D" for DOS files. A question mark indicates all
    user numbers are included. If you want your DOS files backed
    up according to a preceding PATH: record, the first field must
    contain a "D."

    The second field is the source drive containing the files to be
    backed up. You can use a question mark (?) in this field to
    indicate any valid source drive specified in the SOURCE:
    record. If the source drive field of an EXC: record specifying
    DOS files does not correspond to the source drive designation
    for the root directory in the preceding PATH: record, BackRest
    displays the following error message before returning control
    to Concurrent:

    Fatal Control File (CONTROL.BR) Error:
    Drive differs from previous "PATH:"
    EXC: D,c,a,k,*.TXT <-- Always Backup DOS .TXT files

    An EXC: record's third field is a single letter representing
    the backup process you want BackRest to perform on the files
    specified in the EXC: record. This field can be set to one of
    the following:

    o "A" for Always backup the specified files
    o "C" for Conditionally backup the specified files
    o "N" for Never backup the specified files

    Use "C" when you want BackRest to back up the files specified
    in the EXC: record only if they have been modified since the
    last backup session.

    The fourth field is a single letter representing the
    disposition of the specified files. Use one of the following
    letters:


    o "D" to Delete the files from the source drive. If "A" or
    "C" is in the third (process) field, BackRest deletes
    the files after they have been successfully backed up
    on a destination disk.

    o "K" to Keep the files on the source drive after backup.


    The fifth field specifies the files the EXC: record acts upon.
    If you use wildcard characters (? and * ) for the file
    specification in this field, BackRest searches the files on the
    source drive for matching characters in the filenames and
    extensions.

    Note: You must place EXC: records that use wildcard characters
    in a sequence of least ambiguous records first. EXC: records
    that contain explicit file specifications must appear in
    CONTROL.BR before those that use any form of ambiguous file
    reference.

    The sixth field, the password, is optional. Enter the
    passwords for any password-protected CP/M files you want
    BackRest to back up. If you use this field, the control file
    will contain the passwords for your CP/M files. To protect
    your passwords, use Concurrent's SET command to assign
    "TSERKCAB" as a password for CONTROL.BR as shown below:

    A>SET D:CONTROL.BR[PASSWORD=TSERKCAB]

    where "D:" is the drive containing the CONTROL.BR file. If you
    use another password for CONTROL.BR, you must set the default
    to the same password so that BackRest can access CONTROL.BR.
    For example, if your password is "xyz," do the following:

    A>SET D:[DEFAULT=XYZ]

    Note: BackRest does not password-protect files the backup
    files it creates. If you use BackRest to back up password-
    protected files, store your backup disks in a secure area.

    Examples
    EXC: ?,?,n,d,*.$$$

    This example affects all user numbers (first "?") on all source
    drives (second "?"). It tells BackRest never to back up (n)
    temporary files (*.$$$) and to delete (d) these files from the
    source drive.

    EXE: O,c,c,k,*.tex,eliot

    This example marks all the files in user number 0 on source
    drive C with an extension of TEX and a password of "ELIOT" as
    exceptions. It tells BackRest to back up these files only if
    they have been modified since the last backup and to keep the
    original versions on source drive C.

    PATH: C:Eliot
    EXC: D,c,a,k,SALES.*

    This example specifies all DOS files (D) on drive C (c) with a
    filename of SALES. It tells BackRest to always back up these
    files (a) and to keep (k) their original versions on drive C.
    Use this EXC: record format for DOS files you want BackRest to
    back up from a subdirectory declared by a preceding PATH:
    record (in this example, Eliot).


    BACKREST COMMANDS
    -----------------

    This section describes the use of the BACK and REST commands.


    BACK Command
    ------------

    The BACK command allows you to specify how your hard-disk files
    are copied to backup disks. The forms of the BACK command are:

    BACK
    BACK FULL
    BACK CONTROL=n
    BACK REPORT

    If you have previously copied BACK.CMD to your system drive,
    you can enter any of the BACK commands from any drive.
    BackRest does require, however, that the current drive contain
    the CONTROL.BR file. Each of the BACK commands are described
    below.


    BACK -- Routine Hard-disk Backup
    --------------------------------

    Use this form of the BACK command the first time you back up
    your hard-disk files and afterwards for routine hard-disk
    backup sessions. Subsequent use of this command will cause
    BackRest to back up only new files or those which have been
    modified since the last backup session.

    This command causes hard-disk backup to occur according to the
    default control file records in the CONTROL.BR file. Unless
    you have previously set the system date (see DATE in Section 8
    of the Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide), BACK asks you to enter
    the correct date:

    Please enter today's date correctly as MM/DD/YY ==>

    You can optionally enter the correct date as part of the BACK
    command line:

    A>BACK MM/DD/YY

    Here, BACK accepts the date you type at the command line and
    does not prompt you for it. Once BACK has the correct date,
    BackRest signs on and indicates which drive and user number or
    subdirectory path will be backed up according to the SOURCE:
    record in CONTROL.BR:

    BackRest (tm) for Concurrent (tm) PC-DOS
    Hard-disk Backup Facility - Version 2.01
    Copyright (c) 1983, 84, Stok Software, Inc.

    Backing up drive x:, user n

    After indicating which drive and user number or path is to be
    backed up, BACK prompts you to insert a backup disk in the
    destination drive as follows:

    Please insert a new CP/M Media disk in drive A:
    Touch RETURN key when ready ==>_

    If the source drive is a DOS partition, the above prompt shows
    "DOS" in place of "CP/M." When you have inserted a properly
    formatted disk of the indicated media and pressed the Enter
    key, BACK begins reading the files to be backed up from the
    source drive and writing them to the backup disk in the
    destination drive. This is indicated by the messages:

    Backing up drive x:, user n
    Reading filename ext
    and
    Backing up drive x:, user n
    Writing filename ext

    When BACK has finished writing a file to the backup disk, it
    verifies that the backup file is the same as the source file.
    BACK reports that it is checking a file by displaying the
    following message:

    Backing up drive x:, user n
    Verifying filename ext

    When a backup disk is full, BACK displays the disk's unique
    volume number so that you can label the disk appropriately.
    BACK asks for more backup disks when it requires them as
    follows:

    Please remove the disk in drive A: and place a label on
    it indicating volume:x

    then insert a new CP/M Media disk.

    Touch RETURN key when ready ==>_


    When BackRest has finished its backup operations, it displays
    the following message before sending its report to your
    printer:

    Printing report, please standby...
    End of BackRest processing

    If the REPORT PRINT: record field is "false," BackRest displays
    the following message at the end of its backup operations:

    End of BackRest processing

    If you have modified the SOURCE: or USERS: record fields in the
    CONTROL.BR file after BACK has used it to back up your hard-
    disk files, BackRest displays the following message on your
    screen:

    I will obey the new parameters you placed in the
    CONTROL.BR file with a FULL backup this time.

    Is that all right? (Y or N) ===>

    This message means that BackRest will back up every file (as
    defined in CONTROL.BR) and not just those which have been
    modified or created since BACK was last used. If you enter "N"
    in response to this message, BackRest returns control to
    Concurrent.

    You can return control to Concurrent and stop BackRest from
    processing a BACK command by typing "C" while holding down the
    Ctrl key. When you cancel BACK processing, the program
    responds by displaying:

    Do you want to print the report (Y/N) ==>_

    If you type "Y," BackRest sends its report to your printer. If
    you enter "N," BackRest displays:

    User abort of backup process

    and returns control to Concurrent. If you abort backup
    processing, you must do a full backup the next time.


    BACK FULL -- Complete Hard-disk Backup
    --------------------------------------

    Use this form of the BACK command to cause BackRest to perform
    a complete hard-disk backup. BACK FULL forces BackRest to
    ignore its references to previously backed up files. All hard-
    disk files that satisfy the parameters in CONTROL.BR are backed
    up. If BackRest cannot locate its DIR.BR file on the control
    drive, backup disk numbering begins again from 00001.

    BACK FULL is equivalent to using the BACK command form for a
    first backup. You can include the date in the BACK FULL
    command line in one of two ways:

    A>BACK FULL MM/DD/YY
    or
    A>BACK MM/DD/YY FULL

    The BACK FULL command causes BackRest to over-write its DIR.BR
    file. This means that BackRest loses any reference to backup
    operations it has performed prior to a complete hard-disk
    backup initiated by BACK FULL. In all other aspects, BACK FULL
    operates just like BACK.


    BACK CONTROL=n -- Specialized Hard-disk Backup
    ----------------------------------------------

    The BACK CONTROL=n command tells BackRest to take its
    instructions from the records in a special control file. "n"
    indicates any character "A" through "Z" or "0" (zero) through
    "9."

    Special control files are actually modified copies of
    CONTROL.BR. You can create a special control file by making a
    copy of CONTROL.BR (use COPY), giving it a new name, and
    modifying its control records. Special control files are
    designated by an extra character in the filename. For example,
    you can use CONTROLI.BR to identify a control file whose
    records you have changed to control the backup and restoration
    of inventory files. The following command would cause BackRest
    to back up hard-disk files according to the records in
    CONTROLI.BR:


    BACK CONTROL=I
    --------------

    All files and backup disks used with this form of the BACK
    command are identified with the character used to designate the
    special control file. For example, "BACK CONTROL=I" would
    cause the first backup disk volume number to be "I-1."

    As with the other BACK commands, you can include the date in
    the BACK CONTROL=n command line as follows:

    A>BACK MM/DD/YY CONTROL=n
    or
    A>BACK CONTROL=n MM/DD/YY

    The BACK CONTROL=n command displays the same messages as the
    BACK command to request the date and backup disks and to notify
    you of its current operation.


    BACK REPORT -- Print Backup Report
    ----------------------------------

    The BACK REPORT command sends a report of backup operations to
    your printer. BackRest prints its backup reports automatically
    unless the REPORT PRINT: record field in CONTROL.BR is "false."
    Use this command to print a record of the previous backup
    operation. See "BackRest Reports."


    REST Commands
    -------------

    The REST commands allow you to restore files you previously
    backed up from your hard-disk partitions with the BACK
    commands. There are three forms of the REST command:

    REST
    REST CONTROL=n
    REST REPORT

    If you have copied REST.CMD to your system drive as described
    in "Setting Up BackRest," you can enter any of the REST
    commands from any drive. BackRest does require, however, that
    the current drive (the drive from which you enter the command)
    contain the CONTROL.BR file. Each of the REST commands are
    described below.


    REST -- Routine Hard-disk File Restoration
    ------------------------------------------

    Use this form of the REST command to restore your hard-disk
    files according to the records in CONTROL.BR. When you type:

    A>REST

    and press the Enter key, BackRest responds by displaying its
    Restore Facility Menu. By offering you options and prompting
    you for information, the Restore Facility Menu allows you to
    specify which files you want restored to your hard disk. It
    gives you the following options:


    Restore. .

    1 - Bad Files Automatically
    2 - Other Files

    [RETURN KEY] - End


    If you type "1," REST reads the REPORT.BR file created by BACK
    to determine which files were unusable at the time of the last
    backup. REST then looks for the backup disk volume that
    contains the most recently backed up version of the file. When
    REST has located the last copy of the file that was known to be
    usable, it prompts you to insert the disk with that specific
    backup disk volume number in the proper drive:

    Please insert in drive d: disk volume: xx:
    Touch RETURN key when ready ==>_

    If you insert the wrong backup disk in response to this prompt,
    REST displays

    Wrong volume. . .

    and requests the correct volume number again.

    If BACK did not encounter any "bad" files during the last
    backup operation, REST displays the following message in
    response to your selection of the first option:

    There are no bad files to restore

    If you select the second option from the Restore Facility Menu
    by typing "2," REST prompts you for the source drive to be
    restored:

    Enter drive to restore [A-P] or [RETURN] for any ==>_

    Reply to this prompt by typing one of the single-letter drive
    designations used in the SOURCE: control file record. Press
    the Enter key to indicate that you want REST to use any drive
    from the SOURCE: record to restore your files by user number or
    path, filename, and date of backup.

    REST prompts you next for the user number or subdirectory path
    that you want restored:

    Enter user to restore [0-15] or [RETURN] for any ==>_
    Enter path to restore or [RETURN] for any ==>_

    Type any number in the range of 0 to 15 to specify the user
    number that contains the files you want restored. Specify the
    DOS subdirectory according to the requirements discussed in the
    description of the PATH: record. If you press the Enter key,
    your files are restored by filename and/or date of backup.
    REST asks you which files you want restored by displaying:

    Enter file name to restore (may be wildcard) ==>_

    You can enter the name of a single file or use wildcard
    characters (? and *) to specify a group of files. For example,
    "*.txt" would tell REST to restore all files with an extension
    of TXT. Enter "*.*" to indicate every file previously backed
    up (see "Wildcards" in Lesson 2 of Getting Started with
    Concurrent PC DOS).

    REST's last prompt asks you to specify the date of backup for
    the files you want restored:

    Enter restore date as MM/DD/YY or [RETURN] for latest ==>_

    You can request a specific version of a file according to the
    date of backup or press the Enter key to tell REST that you
    want the most recently backed up copies. The date of backup is
    shown in the heading of the backup reports.

    When REST finds the volume number of the backup disk that
    contains the files you have indicated, it asks you to insert
    that disk in the proper drive:

    Please insert in drive d: disk volume: xx
    Touch RETURN key when ready ==>_

    If REST cannot locate any files that correspond to your
    specifications, it displays the following message and returns
    you to the Restore Facility Menu:

    Your request did not match any files backed up

    After REST has restored all the files that match your
    specifications, it sends the restore report to your printer.
    REST notifies you of this with the message:

    Printing report, please standby . . .

    When REST has finished the report, it displays

    End of BackRest processing

    and returns control to Concurrent. Note that REST does not
    print its report if the REPORT PRINT: record field in the
    control file is set to "false." You can cancel restore
    processing at any time by holding down the Ctrl key and typing
    "C". This causes REST to display the following message:

    Do you want to print the report (Y/N)? ==>_

    If you type "Y," REST sends its report to your printer and then
    returns control to Concurrent. Entering a response of "N"
    causes REST to display this message immediately before
    returning control to Concurrent:

    User Abort of restore process


    REST CONTROL=n -- Specialized File Restoration
    ----------------------------------------------

    This form of the REST command tells BackRest to use the records
    in a special control file. "n" indicates any character "A"
    through "Z" or "0" (zero) through "9." Special control files
    are described under the "BACK CONTROL=n" command above.


    REST REPORT -- Print Restore Report
    -----------------------------------

    Use this command to print a report of the previous restore
    operation by typing:

    A>REST REPORT

    and then pressing the Enter key. BackRest displays the
    following message before sending the report to your printer:

    Printing report, please standby . . .

    When the report has been printed, REST displays

    End of BackRest processing

    and returns control to Concurrent. If the REPORT PRINT: record
    field in the control file is set to "false," REST does not
    print its report in response to this command. If you have not
    previously run REST, the report consists of only one line:

    File RESTRPT.BR cannot be found.


    Restoring Password-protected Files
    ----------------------------------

    REST will not over-write password-protected files. You must
    therefore remove password protection from CP/M files on your
    hard disk before restoring other versions of the files with
    REST. Reset the password protection after the new versions of
    the files have been restored.

    REST restores a file with a temporary extension (.$$$) when an
    existing version of the file is still password-protected. If
    this occurs, erase the original file and rename the newly
    restored, temporary version. Be sure to reinstate password
    protection for the renamed file.


    BACKREST REPORTS
    ----------------

    BackRest sends its reports to your printer when its backup and
    restore operations are completed. BackRest reports provide you
    with a permanent reference of previous backup and restore
    operations, hard-disk statistics, and any errors the program
    encountered during its processing. All reports are formatted
    according to the Report Records in BackRest's control file.


    Backup Report
    -------------

    Backup reports are made up of four sections: files backed up,
    files skipped, files deleted, and bad files. BackRest prints
    the heading contained in the field of the ID: record on each
    page of a backup report.

    The first section of a backup report lists every file copied
    during the previous backup session. Backed up files are
    presented according to source drive, backup disk volume number,
    and user number (CP/M files) or subdirectory path (DOS files).
    BackRest also indicates the disposition of every file by
    printing "D" or "K" after each filename according to the fourth
    field of the control file EXC: records. Remember that "D"
    shows that BackRest deleted the file after it created a backup
    copy; "K" tells you that the source file was kept on the source
    drive after BackRest copied it to a backup disk.

    BackRest uses the letter "S" to indicate a split file.
    BackRest splits any single file too large to fit on one blank
    backup disk. If the SPLIT: record field is "true," BackRest
    also splits files so that a disk's space is used completely.
    The format of this section of a backup report is shown below.


    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84

    Files Backed Up

    Drive D User 0 Backup Volume 00003

    CONSOLE .BAS K DELTA .BAT K DISPLAY .CMD K DONE .BAT K


    Drive D User 1 Backup Volume 00003

    AUDIT .DAT D BATCH .CMD K CCPM .SYS S

    Figure 1. CP/M Backup Report


    DOS files listed in a backup report are shown according to
    subdirectory path:


    Drive C Backup Volume 00004

    Path:\ELIOT
    APRIL .GL K AUGUST .GL K FEBR .GL K JAN .GL K

    Figure 2. DOS Backup Report


    The "Files Skipped" section of a backup report is included only
    if the SHOW SKIPS: record field is "true." This section of a
    backup report lists all the files not backed up according to
    the EXC: records in the control file. This section of the
    report also uses the "D" and "K" disposition indicators.

    The third section of a backup report, "Files Deleted," provides
    a breakdown of all the files deleted during the last backup
    session. Only the "D" disposition indicator appears in this
    section of the report.

    The last section of a backup report lists all the files that
    BackRest could not read during a backup session. These "bad
    files" are not deleted. BackRest does not obey an EXC: record
    if it would cause the program to erase an unreadable file. See
    "The REST Command" for information on using BackRest to restore
    "bad files."


    Restore Report
    --------------

    BackRest prints a report of the files it has restored as part
    of REST processing. An example restore report is shown
    below. (Note that for CP/M files user number is indicated
    instead of path.)


    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84

    Files Restored

    Drive C Backup Volume 00001

    Path:\
    CTYPE .H CURRENT .TXT SAMPLE .C

    Figure 3. DOS Restore Report


    Hard-disk Statistics Report
    ---------------------------

    The hard-disk statistics report shows the amount of disk space
    and number of files in each user number (CP/M) or path (DOS) as
    specified in the control file Exception Records or through
    Concurrent's File Manager. This report also shows the number
    of files backed up in each user number or subdirectory, the
    total number of files backed up on a disk, the amount of hard-
    disk space available, and the total number of directory areas
    used for CP/M files.


    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84

    Statistics Report

    Date of last backup: 06/04/84

    Drive D: User 0: 1043K in 102 files. 4 files backed up.
    Drive D: User 1: 159K in 8 files. 4 files backed up.

    Drive D: Total of 8 files backed up out of 110.
    Drive D: 3293K available. 324 directory areas used.

    Figure 4. CP/M Hard-disk Statistics Report


    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84


    Statistics Report

    Date of last backup: 06/04/84

    Path:\
    Drive C: 1254K in 108 files. 10 files backed up.

    Path:\ELIOT
    Drive C: 253K in 39 files. 4 files backed up.

    Drive C: Total of 14 files backed up out of 147.
    Drive C: 3909K available.

    Figure 5. DOS Hard-disk Statistics Report


    Error Report
    ------------

    This report lists any errors BackRest encountered during backup
    and restore operations.


    BackRest 2.x Report for Pacific Grove Dental Clinic done on 06/05/84

    Error Report

    Unresolved Error Source APRIL.AP on Drive D: User 0,
    backup retried on new disk.

    1 wrong volumes inserted by operator.

    Figure 6. CP/M Error Report


    This example shows that BACK encountered an error it could not
    resolve while backing up the file APRIL.AP from user number 0,
    drive D. The error message indicates that BACK copied the file
    to another backup disk. The second error occurred when the
    user inserted the incorrect backup disk during a restore
    operation. In this case, REST would have prompted the user for
    the proper disk.


    Example Error Report Messages
    -----------------------------

    Warning ! Source and destination drive X: were the same,
    skipped it as source.

    This message means the same drive was specified as both a
    source and destination drive in the SOURCE: and DEST DRIVE:
    control file records.


    Verify error on file xxxxxxxx.xxx on Drive X: backup
    retried on new disk.

    This means the backup copy of the indicated file did not
    exactly match the source file. BackRest attempted another copy
    on a different backup disk.


    Destination Backup Drive X: has a Sector Error
    backup retried on new disk.

    A media error occurred while BackRest was writing a backup
    file. BackRest attempted another copy on a different backup
    disk.


    Source Disk Sector Error in File xxxxxxxx.xxx on
    Drive X: skipped file.

    A media error occurred while BackRest was reading a source
    file. The file was not copied to a backup disk.


    EOF


  3. Re: BACK and REST Documentation

    Usually, I publish stuff only after proof-reading it.

    This time, I published the BACK-REST doc before. Now that I have re-read and
    proof-read it, I notice that it contains some "B-1" instances: meaning: it was
    Appendix B of something, probably the "Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 User's Guide".

    Does someone has the full set of manuals for Concurrent PC DOS 3.2?

    I also read the HDMAINT.DOC file (that is missing for CP/M-86 Plus): it says
    that Appendix C contains the list of error messages... again, probably for the
    "Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 User's Guide".

    So, there is a pretty powerful BACK-REST utility available under Concurrent
    CP/M (and probably CP/M-86), if someone want to use it.

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"


  4. Re: BACK and REST Documentation

    >This time, I published the BACK-REST doc before. Now that I have re-read and
    >proof-read it, I notice that it contains some "B-1" instances: meaning: it was
    >Appendix B of something, probably the "Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 User's Guide".


    I was forgetting: I have the "Concurrent PC DOS" book, but its Appendix B does
    not contain the BACK-REST doc (however, another appendix contains the list of
    error messages, as mentioned in the HDMAIND.DOC file).

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"

  5. Re: BACK and REST Documentation

    Hi FL,

    French Luser wrote:
    >>This time, I published the BACK-REST doc before. Now that I have re-read and
    >>proof-read it, I notice that it contains some "B-1" instances: meaning: it was
    >>Appendix B of something, probably the "Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 User's Guide".

    >
    >
    > I was forgetting: I have the "Concurrent PC DOS" book, but its Appendix B does
    > not contain the BACK-REST doc (however, another appendix contains the list of
    > error messages, as mentioned in the HDMAIND.DOC file).
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > "French Luser"


    there is a book by Mark Dahmke "Using Concurrent PC DOS". Chapter 9
    of this book explains the use of the BACK.CMD and REST.CMD programms.

    Greetings,

    Uwe.


  6. Re: BACK and REST Documentation

    Thanks to Uwe Nass, the following complements the BACKREST
    documentation.

    Is anybody out there who has the Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 and/or 4.1 paper
    doc?

    Yours Sincerely,
    Emmanuel Roche


    UCPCDOS9.WS4 (= "Using Concurrent PC DOS", chapter 9)
    ------------

    - "Using Concurrent PC DOS"
    Mark Dahmke
    McGraw-Hill, 1986

    (Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)


    Chapter 9: The Backup/Restore Facility
    --------------------------------------

    The problem of making backup copies of important files has been
    compounded by
    the widespread use of 10 Megabyte and larger fixed disks.
    Directory
    fragmentation (the use of subdirectories in a tree structure) makes
    organizing
    files into logical groups easier, but it also frustrates efforts
    to make
    backups. One standard method is to back up files by subdirectory. A
    simple
    mass copy using a wildcard filename such as *.* (all files) or *.DAT
    (just
    data files) will transfer all files in a subdirectory to a floppy
    disk for
    safe keeping.

    Problems do arise, though. First, copying all files in a directory
    is very
    inefficient. Most files will probably not have changed, while some,
    such as
    program (EXE, COM, CMD, and BAT) files, don't need to be
    backed up
    periodically if you keep the original or master diskette separately in
    a safe
    place. Also, a mass copy cannot handle special situations, such as
    when the
    destination or backup disk becomes full before all files are
    transferred. In
    the latter case, you would have to know which files have already been
    backed
    up, and manually copy the remainder to another disk.

    Ideally, a backup facility should allow you to choose groups of files
    to copy,
    specify files that shouldn't be copied, and allow for files that are
    too large
    to put on one floppy disk. It should also keep track of where the
    backup
    copies are (by volume labels), and allow you to restore a file in
    case the
    working copy has been damaged or lost. However, some backup/restore
    utilities
    give you an all-or-nothing choice: restore all files on the hard disk,
    or none
    at all. Restoring just one file or a group of files means reloading the
    entire
    hard disk and losing other files in the process.

    Concurrent PC DOS comes with BACK and REST, two programs that will
    perform a
    backup or restore operation according to a customized control file
    that you
    can create. These utilities, collectively referred to as "BackRest",
    make it
    easy to keep your hard disk organized, and all your files protected.


    BackRest files
    --------------

    BackRest needs three files to operate: BACK.CMD, REST.CMD, and
    CONTROL.BR. The
    CMD files are the actual backup and restore programs that get
    their
    instructions from the CONTROL.BR file. A sample control file is shown
    below.
    The control file tells BackRest what files you want to back up; what
    files,
    directories, or user numbers are exceptions to the rule; how to
    report the
    activities of BACK and REST; and so on.

    Files Backed Up
    Drive C Backup Volume 00001

    Path \CDOS
    BACK .CMD K BATCH .CMD K CHDIR .CMD K CONTROL .BR K
    DSKMAINT.CMD K ERASE .EXE K FM .CMD K PIP .CMD K
    REST .CMD K SYSDISK .CMD K TYPE .CMD K

    Files Skipped
    Drive C

    Path \CDOS
    CONTROL .BAK K DIR .BR K PATHS .BR K REPORT .BR K

    Statistics Report

    Path \CDOS
    Drive C: 232K in 17 files. 13 files backed up.

    Drive C: Total of 13 files backed up out of 17.
    Drive C: 348K available.

    In operation, BackRest creates several additional work files, all
    with the
    "BR" file type. Because BackRest uses this file type, none of your file
    should
    have a BR file type. The three types of work files are: a directory
    file, a
    path file, and a report file. The directory file, DIR.BR, is used
    to keep
    track of the files that have been copied to each of the backup
    diskettes. The
    path file, PATHS.BR, records all the path names encountered on PC
    DOS-media
    disks during a backup operation. Two types of report files are
    created:
    REPORT.BR and RESTRPT.BR. These files report the results of backup and
    restore
    operations, respectively. Other files are created that are temporary
    and have
    the "BR@" file type. These files should not be erased, renamed, or
    changed to
    read-only status.

    BackRest will only back up files not previously backed up and files
    that have
    changed since the last backup. All files are written to one or more
    diskettes,
    which must have been previously formatted according to the disk media
    being
    backed up. For example, if BackRest is to back up a CP/M-media
    fixed disk
    partition, it will request that you insert CP/M-media floppy disks
    into the
    destination drive. Each backup disk will be given a volume label
    which is
    written as a disk file with a length of zero bytes. For example, the
    label -C-
    00001.VOL indicates that the file came from the C drive and that this
    is the
    first diskette on the sequence of backup diskettes.

    BackRest keeps track of all files that have been backed up in the
    DIR.BR file.
    It contains the name of each file, the date that file was backed up,
    and the
    volume number of the backup diskette it was written to.


    Disk media considerations
    -------------------------

    BackRest can handle files stored on either PC DOS or CP/M media but,
    because
    of the media differences discussed in Chapter 5, different
    procedures are
    often required for each media. For example, CP/M media allows for
    password
    protection of files. If you are using passwords, you must specify them
    in the
    CONTROL.BR file. All protected files will be backed up, but the
    backup
    diskettes will not be password-protected; therefore, these diskettes
    should be
    stored in a place where unauthorized personnel will not have access to
    them.


    Control file options
    --------------------

    The listing above, in the "BackRest files" section, shows a typical
    CONTROL.BR
    file used with BackRest. Multiple control files may be created for
    various
    applications. For example, you could set up special control files to
    back up
    files in groups by application. These control files must have an
    identifier
    character attached to the file name, such as CONTROLA.BR. To use the
    special
    control file when invoking BACK or REST, you would specify CONTROL=A
    in the
    command line.

    The first group of control statements in CONTROL.BR defines console
    controls,
    such as the commands that will clear the screen and set color
    attributes for
    errors and prompt messages. The next group defines the printer
    control
    sequences that tell BackRest what your printer is capable of. These
    controls
    are described in detail in the "Concurrent PC DOS User's Guide"
    and the
    BACKREST.DOC file that is included on the distribution diskettes.

    Report generation is controlled by the REPORT PRINT, SHOW SKIPS,
    and ID
    commands. If REPORT PRINT is followed by the keyword TRUE, a
    report will
    always be generated when BackRest is finished. SHOW SKIPS TRUE adds a
    list of
    files not backed up to the report. ID allows you to put a title at the
    top of
    the report. This feature is handy when you have several CONTROL.BR
    files, or
    several personal computers to keep track of. The ID field could be
    "Inventory
    File Backup" or "Accounting Dept PC Backup", for example.

    The next group of control records tells BackRest what options are
    desired in
    backup and restore operations. SPLIT: TRUE allows files to be split
    across two
    diskettes if there is insufficient space on one diskette. BELL
    REPEAT: TRUE
    enables beep prompts. DEST DRIVE: lets you specify the destination disk
    drive
    to which the backup files are to be writen. SOURCE: likewise
    selects the
    drives to be backed up. CONTROL DRIVE: defines the drive to be
    used by
    BackRest for work files. VERIFY: TRUE enables read-after-write
    verification of
    all files, to ensure complete accuracy. REUSE: TRUE allows backup
    diskettes to
    be reused. ERASE: TRUE causes diskettes used for backup to be erased
    before
    being reused. USERS: lets you select which CP/M-media user numbers
    (disk
    areas) are to be backed up and restored.

    Paths for PC DOS-media may also be specified. If no paths are given,
    only the
    current directory will be backed up. For example:

    PATH: C:\
    PATH: C:\inventory
    PATH: C:\accounts

    will cause the files in the root directory, and the INVENTORY and
    ACCOUNTS
    directories, to be backed up.


    Exceptions
    ----------

    The above control records define the normal operation of
    BackRest. The
    following commands let you specify exceptions to the above rules; for
    example,
    you may not want to back up certain files. Exception records also
    let you
    delete files after they have been copied. The format of an exception
    record
    is:

    EXC: user/D, d, proces, disposition, filename.ext [,password]

    where:

    user/D specifies a user number for CP/M media, or the letter
    "D" for
    DOS media.

    d is the source drive.

    process is the process to be used: "A" for always back
    up the
    specified files, "C" for conditional backup, and "N"
    for never
    back up the files.

    disposition can be either "D", to delete the files from the source
    drive
    once backed up, or "K", to keep the source drive files.

    filename.ext can be any file name, with or without wildcard
    characters (?
    or *) to match one or more file names.

    [,password] The last field is optional and for CP/M media only,
    if a
    password is required to read the file.

    For example, if you want to back up all files of the DAT type on
    the (DOS
    media) C disk, the command EXC: D,C,A,K,*.DAT would perform this
    function.
    While you are running backups, it is also possible to free some disk
    space by
    getting rid of the BAK files that are created by many programs
    and word
    processors. This can be accomplished by the command EXC:
    D,C,A,D,*.BAK. All
    files on the C drive (DOS media) will be backed up, and then deleted
    if they
    have the BAK file type.


    Invoking BackRest
    -----------------

    Two methods are available to run BACK or REST. As usual, the BACK
    or REST
    commands can be entered at the C> prompt, or they can be put in a batch
    file.
    The File Manager also has a Backup/Restore menu entry.

    >From the C> prompt, the CONTROL.BR file will be the sole source of

    commands
    for a backup or restore operation. You may specify three parameters:
    FULL,
    CONTROL=n, and REPORT, for the BACK command, and two for the REST
    command:
    CONTROL=N, and REPORT.

    The FULL option will force a full fixed disk backup, which causes
    BACK to
    ignore references to previously backed up files. All files that
    match the
    commands and exceptions in the CONTROL file will be backed up.
    CONTROL=n lets
    you select an alternate control file for the backup operation. REPORT
    forces
    generation of a report if the REPORT PRINT: command was set to
    FALSE.
    Normally, a report is always generated.

    The REST command also lets you give the CONTROL=n and REPORT overrides
    of the
    CONTROL file.

    The second method of invoking BackRest is from the File Manager. From
    the main
    menu panel of the File Manager, you can select a group of files to back
    up by
    pressing the Tab key, and using Insert and Delete to choose files
    from the
    menu. If you then invoke the Backup Files menu, you will be presented
    with a
    list of all the files you selected. If you then specify the destination
    drive
    and the Backup Files command, the File Manager will create a
    CONTROL.BR file
    and call BACK for you. All the files you specify will be included
    in the
    control file by name in EXC (exception) command records. From then
    on, BACK
    will work as described above.


    EOF


  7. Re: BACK and REST Documentation


    French Luser wrote:
    > Thanks to Uwe Nass, the following complements the BACKREST
    > documentation.
    >
    > Is anybody out there who has the Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 and/or 4.1 paper
    > doc?
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Emmanuel Roche
    >
    >
    > UCPCDOS9.WS4 (= "Using Concurrent PC DOS", chapter 9)
    > ------------



    I have at least the following:

    Concurrent CP/M 3.1 User's Guide - 1984
    Concurrent CP/M 3.1 Programmer's Guide - 1984
    Concurrent CP/M Programmer's Pack for PC XT
    Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 - 1984 - Several manuals in a binder
    Concurrent DOS 4.1 Programmer's Guide Supplement
    Concurrent DOS 4.1 System Guide Supplement

    Jeff

    ================================================
    Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.

  8. Re: BACK and REST Documentation


    French Luser wrote:
    > Thanks to Uwe Nass, the following complements the BACKREST
    > documentation.
    >
    > Is anybody out there who has the Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 and/or 4.1 paper
    > doc?
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Emmanuel Roche
    >
    >
    > UCPCDOS9.WS4 (= "Using Concurrent PC DOS", chapter 9)
    > ------------



    I have at least the following:

    Concurrent CP/M 3.1 User's Guide - 1984
    Concurrent CP/M 3.1 Programmer's Guide - 1984
    Concurrent CP/M Programmer's Pack for PC XT
    Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 - 1984 - Several manuals in a binder
    Concurrent DOS 4.1 Programmer's Guide Supplement
    Concurrent DOS 4.1 System Guide Supplement

    Jeff

    ================================================
    Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.

  9. Re: BACK and REST Documentation


    Jeffrey W. Shook wrote:
    > French Luser wrote:
    > > Thanks to Uwe Nass, the following complements the BACKREST
    > > documentation.
    > >
    > > Is anybody out there who has the Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 and/or 4.1 paper
    > > doc?
    > >
    > > Yours Sincerely,
    > > Emmanuel Roche
    > >
    > >
    > > UCPCDOS9.WS4 (= "Using Concurrent PC DOS", chapter 9)
    > > ------------

    >
    > >
    > I have at least the following:
    >
    > Concurrent CP/M 3.1 User's Guide - 1984
    > Concurrent CP/M 3.1 Programmer's Guide - 1984
    > Concurrent CP/M Programmer's Pack for PC XT

    Regarding the programmer's Pack, whose software is on Gaby's site, what
    is the programmer's documentation for it? - or is _that_ the name of
    the documentaion which covers it?

    Steve

    > Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 - 1984 - Several manuals in a binder
    > Concurrent DOS 4.1 Programmer's Guide Supplement
    > Concurrent DOS 4.1 System Guide Supplement
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    > ================================================
    > Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    > but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.



  10. Re: BACK and REST Documentation


    s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:
    > Jeffrey W. Shook wrote:
    >
    >>French Luser wrote:
    >>
    >>>Thanks to Uwe Nass, the following complements the BACKREST
    >>>documentation.
    >>>
    >>>Is anybody out there who has the Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 and/or 4.1 paper
    >>>doc?
    >>>
    >>>Yours Sincerely,
    >>>Emmanuel Roche
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>UCPCDOS9.WS4 (= "Using Concurrent PC DOS", chapter 9)
    >>>------------

    >>
    >> >>
    >>I have at least the following:
    >>
    >> Concurrent CP/M 3.1 User's Guide - 1984
    >> Concurrent CP/M 3.1 Programmer's Guide - 1984
    >> Concurrent CP/M Programmer's Pack for PC XT

    >
    > Regarding the programmer's Pack, whose software is on Gaby's site, what
    > is the programmer's documentation for it? - or is _that_ the name of
    > the documentaion which covers it?
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >
    >> Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 - 1984 - Several manuals in a binder
    >> Concurrent DOS 4.1 Programmer's Guide Supplement
    >> Concurrent DOS 4.1 System Guide Supplement
    >>
    >>Jeff
    >>
    >>================================================
    >>Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    >>but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.

    >
    >


    The documentation in the Programmers Pack is the following:
    The ones marked # seem to be identical to ones in the Library
    at www.cpm.z80.de/drilib.html. The ones marked $ are similar
    but not the same version.

    Concurrent CP/M PC/XT Programmer's Pak - Two 3 ring binders in boxes

    Binder 1
    # Concurrent CP/M Operating System Programmer's Reference Guide
    First Edition: January 1984 1034-2023 Copyright 1984

    # GSX Graphics Extension Programmer's Guide
    Second Edition: September 1983 5000-2024 Copyright 1983

    $ GSX-86 Graphics Extension User's Guide for the IBM Personal
    Computer
    First Edition: July 1983 ????-???? Copyright 1983

    Binder 2
    $ SID 86 Productivity Tools User's Guide
    First Edition: March 1982
    Second Edition: August 1982 3038-2004-002 Copyright 1982,
    1984
    # Programmer's Utilities Guide for the CP/M 86 Family of Operating
    Systems
    Second Edition: February 1983 ????-???? Copyright 1982,
    1983

    Jeff

    ================================================
    Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.
    SPAM is already arriving only three days after
    the first use of the address.

  11. Re: Concurrent CP/M BACK and REST

    This is the last thing I was able to find among what I have about BACK
    and REST.

    I hope that this will help people still running CP/M-86 (Plus) and/or
    Concurrent CP/M to use those facilities. I can witness that Hard Disks
    do, indeed, fail when not anticipated, so a set of programs like them
    are really vital if we are to continue using CP/M with hard disks.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Emmanuel Roche


    BACKREST.WS4
    ------------

    BACKUP and RESTORE section of Chapter 6 of the book:

    - "Concurrent PC DOS"
    Balma, Byrd, Guzaitis, Needham & Wandryk
    Prentice-Hall, 1986

    (Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)


    Birth certificates, insurance policies, marriage licenses, wills, and
    other
    important documents are often tucked away at home in cupboards or
    drawers or
    filing cabinets. For an extra margin of safety, most people often
    keep a
    second copy of the most important documents stored away in a safety
    deposit
    box, or some other secure place, just in case the originals are
    somehow lost
    or misplaced. More often than not, the original will always be
    available, and
    the copy may never be needed. However, should something happen
    to the
    original, having a backup copy available could prove to be a real
    lifesaver.

    Similarly, having a backup copy of the information stored on disk
    can also
    prove to be a real lifesaver should something happen to the original
    copy.
    While both floppy disks and hard disks provide a convenient and
    reliable
    method of storing large amounts of information, accidents or
    malfunctions can
    and do occur. A floppy disk may be misplaced, or could be damaged by a
    coffee
    spill. A hard disk could be damaged by a sharp jolt that causes the
    mechanics
    to go out of alignment. Or either one could be accidentally
    erased by
    mistyping a command.

    While losing the only copy of your "Things To Do Today List" might be
    nothing
    more than an inconvenience, losing the only complete copy of your
    customer
    mailing list or all your IRS records may prove to be a much bigger
    problem.
    Since human beings are sometimes fallible creatures,having an
    up-to-date
    backup copy of your disks is always a good idea.

    Making a backup copy of a floppy disk is a very simple exercise.
    Copying the
    entire contents of one disk to a second disk can be accomplished
    quickly and
    easily with Concurrent PC DOS using the COPY command or the File
    Manager.
    However, hard disks offer special problems. Because of the higher cost
    of a
    hard disk drive, maintaining a second hard disk for backup purposes
    is an
    expensive proposition (although, depending on the quantity and
    importance of
    your data, it may actually be the best alternative).

    Moving the information to floppy disks using the COPY command
    is an
    alternative. However, since the hard disk can hold more than 20 floppy
    disks'
    worth of data, organizing and copying the information on a regular
    basis and
    keeping track of all the disks can be a very tedious and
    time-consuming
    process.


    The better way: BACKUP and RESTORE
    ----------------------------------

    Fortunately, a better way does exist. The backup and restore facility
    included
    in Concurrent PC DOS provides a convenient method for moving the
    information
    from your hard disk to floppy disks, and back again if necessary. The
    backup
    facility allows you to transfer data selectively. You can specify
    whether you
    wish to back up the contents of the entire hard disk, or select just
    certain
    portions. You can choose specific files by name, grouping them by file
    name or
    file extensions.

    If you keep files organized by subdirectories or by ser numbers,
    you can
    specify which ones you want to back up. This ability allows you to
    back up
    just those data that you consider important. Or, if certain data
    change
    frequently (for instance, orders that are filled daily), having the
    capability
    to back up just that portion of your hard disk can save time.

    Additionally, the Concurrent PC DOS backup facility can recognize which
    files
    have changed, and which have not, since the lacj backup was performed.
    Rather
    than taking the additional time to make yet another backup copy, only
    those
    files that have changed will be copied. Of course, at any time
    you can
    perform a backup of the entire disk again, if you wish.

    The backup and restore facility is very easy to use. When the output
    floppy
    disk is full, it automatically prompts you to remove the full disk and
    insert
    another. To help keep track of the files, the backup facility tells
    you what
    to label each disk. Later, when it wants to restore a file from the
    floppy to
    the hard disk, it will prompt you to insert the proper disk, giving
    you the
    name of the disk that contains the correct file. To help you keep track
    of the
    process, a report is generated at the end of each backup or restore
    operation,
    that specifies exactly what was done. To make the backup and restore
    procedure
    as easy as possible, both are accessible from the File Manager main
    menu.


    How to back up your hard disk
    -----------------------------

    Both the backup and restore procedure use the file CONTROL.BR.
    This file
    contains specific information that tells the program how you want the
    backup
    or the restore operation to proceed. Included in the file is
    information
    cpecifying which files you want backed up, the type of printer you are
    using
    to generate the report, and whether to verify each file after it is
    copied, to
    ensure accuracy. You can view or modify the contents of the
    file, and
    therefore specify different directions for the procedure, with
    any word
    processor or text editor, including DR EDIX. For safety's sake, make
    sure tha
    you have a copy of the CONTROL.BR file before you make any changes to
    it, to
    ensure that a usable backup is always available. Full instructions for
    editing
    the CONTROL.BR file are included in the BACKREST.DOC file on a
    Concurrent PC
    DOS disk.

    When you start the backup procedure, you will be prompted to insert
    floppy
    disks as required. If you are backing up a CP/M-formatted portion of
    your hard
    disk, you will be prompted to insert CP/M-formatted floppy disks; if
    you are
    backing up a PC DOS-formatted portion, you will be prompted to insert
    PC DOS-
    formatted floppy disks. Additionally, messages will be displayed
    on your
    computer's screen, indicating the progress of the backup procedure.
    As each
    floppy disk is filled, you will be prompted to remove that disk and
    insert a
    new one. You will be prompted to label each disk with a specific name
    given by
    the program.

    The first time the backup procedure is run, all the files,
    drives,
    subdirectories, or user numbers specified in the CONTROL.BR file
    will be
    copied to the backup floppy disks. To save time and floppy disks,
    every
    subsequent backup will only copy the files that have been modified
    since the
    previous backup was performed. Of course, at any time, a complete
    backup of
    all files can be performed again, at your discretion.


    Restoring files to your hard disk
    ---------------------------------

    Since files are normally backed up for security, restoring files
    normally
    occurs only if data are lost. If data are lost because of accidental
    erasures,
    you may proceed with the restoral process without any cause for
    alarm.
    However, if the hard disk on your computer inexplicably loses data,
    contact a
    qualified service representative for troubleshooting and repair.

    The restore procedure is very similar to the backup. Restore works
    from the
    information stored in the CONTROL.BR file. The restoration is
    interactive; you
    will be prompted when to install the various floppy disks. All
    prompts will
    refer to the names given to the floppy disks during the backup
    procedure.
    After the restoration is complete, a report will be generated,
    indicating what
    files were restored.

    For complete information on the backup and restore procedure, refer
    to the
    instructions included in the BACKREST.DOC file included on the
    Concurrent PC
    DOS distribution disks.


    EOF


  12. Re: BACK and REST Documentation


    Jeffrey W. Shook wrote:

    >>================================================
    >>Send mail to jws!use!net@ma!il.ch!em.sun!ysb.edu
    >>but be sure to remove the "!" chars first.




    The documentation in the Programmers Pack is the following:
    The ones marked # seem to be identical to ones in the Library
    at www.cpm.z80.de/drilib.html. The ones marked $ are similar
    but not the same version.

    Concurrent CP/M PC/XT Programmer's Pak - Two 3 ring binders in boxes


    Binder 1
    # Concurrent CP/M Operating System Programmer's Reference Guide
    First Edition: January 1984 1034-2023 Copyright 1984


    # GSX Graphics Extension Programmer's Guide
    Second Edition: September 1983 5000-2024 Copyright 1983


    $ GSX-86 Graphics Extension User's Guide for the IBM Personal
    Computer
    First Edition: July 1983 ????-???? Copyright 1983


    Binder 2
    $ SID 86 Productivity Tools User's Guide
    First Edition: March 1982
    Second Edition: August 1982 3038-2004-002 Copyright 1982,

    1984
    # Programmer's Utilities Guide for the CP/M 86 Family of Operating

    Systems
    Second Edition: February 1983 ????-???? Copyright 1982,
    1983


    Jeff

    ================================================

    Thanks for the info, Jeff.

    Steve


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