CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website - CP/M

This is a discussion on CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website - CP/M ; I have recently added a number of CPM compilers to the Aztec C Website. Quite unexpectedly I received an Aztec-C MS-DOS CP/M 80 Z80 Cross- Compiler a couple of weeks back. I was already almost finished preparing my CP/M 86 ...

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Thread: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

  1. CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    I have recently added a number of CPM compilers to the Aztec C
    Website.

    Quite unexpectedly I received an Aztec-C MS-DOS CP/M 80 Z80 Cross-
    Compiler a couple of weeks back. I was already almost finished
    preparing my CP/M 86 distribution complete with some emulators which I
    had also been provided with quite unexpectedly.

    I then got busy and created some CP/M 80 disk images for the Commodore
    128 (x128 emulator) and also for Simeon Cran's myZ80.

    If you wish to learn more about any of this or to grab my new
    distributions visit the Aztec C website's new CPM section:

    Here's the links (and remember I actually comment this stuff so you'll
    have no problem actually doing something with it):

    http://www.clipshop.ca/Aztec/index.htm#cpm

    =======================================

    http://www.clipshop.ca/Aztec/index.htm#cpm80

    Aztec C for the Z80 and CP/M 80
    Manx Aztec C80
    Version 1.06d
    Developer System
    for CP/M-80
    Target: Z80 and 8080 Native Code

    CP/M-80 development environment for Z80 and compatible computers.
    Preconfigured for cross-development under MS-DOS or Windows XP.

    This is a complete Aztec C build environment for Windows XP (MS-DOS)
    which will enable you to produce Z80 programs for use under CP/M-80.
    This compiler is both the MS-DOS cross-compiler and the native mode CP/
    M 80 Aztec CZ80 Version 1.06d and also includes the earlier Aztec CZ80
    Version 1.05 for native mode CP/M 80.

    Also included are several tools. The emulator disk images are targeted
    at either the x128 Vice emulator for the C128 or the MyZ80 emulator
    from Simeon Cran. You must download these emulators yourself.

    =======================================

    http://www.clipshop.ca/Aztec/index.htm#cpm86

    Aztec C for CP/M 86

    Manx Aztec C86
    Version 3.2d
    Developer System
    for CP/M-86
    Target: X86 Native Code

    CP/M-86 development environment for 8086 and compatible computers.
    Preconfigured for Windows XP

    This is a complete Aztec C build environment for Windows XP (MS-DOS)
    which will enable you to produce X86 programs for use under CP/M-86.
    No support is provided for Windows programming and limited support is
    provided for MS-DOS programming. The flavour of C that is used is not
    ANSI compliant. However I am pleased to be able to provide the
    original documentation for this compiler in a pdf format included in
    the zip file.

    This is very much a hybrid environment.

    I had problems using the original commands that came with the Aztec C
    CP/M-86 version 3.2d using the CPM86 emulator CPM.EXE by Jim
    Lopushinsky so I replaced them with the equivalent commands from the
    Aztec C C-86 version 3.4b to provide a Windows XP build environment
    for creating CP/M-86 .CMD programs. In some of my MAKEFILEs for the
    sample programs that I have put in place I am creating a DOS 2.0 .COM
    as well as a CPM .CMD I wanted to provide the option of testing these
    programs under the XP cmd window with and without the CPM.EXE
    emulator.

    As I got further along I then discovered the AME86.EXE emulator by
    Jean-Marc Lugrin, Digital Equipment Corporation. This emulator was
    originally written for the DEC Rainbow and is reported not to work
    reliably under Windows XP but it has worked almost flawlessly as far
    as I can see provided I use the original commands to build my programs
    with.

    It was Rüdiger Wilcken who also wrote the DOS version of AME86 that
    first mentioned AME86 to me. Rüdiger's version works for him, and
    surprisingly did not work reliably for me. So I went back to the DEC
    Rainbow version.

    All 3 emulators are included for you to try. Obviously what works for
    some will not work for others. In the interest of moving-on with my
    life I have left this hybrid environment in place because I want it to
    work for you.

    You can review the MAKEFILE's in the SAMPLES directories to see what
    it is I am doing and run the demo.bat in each of the directories to
    see how these emulators might work on your system.

    =======================================

    Note: Some of you will have some of these bits and pieces, but for
    anyone wanting to just jump-in and start coding this is all good to
    go.

    Also Lance over at C128 Alive has provided an Aztec C Sub Board and I
    have been putting-up some configuration information about how this all
    works. Naturally I am avoiding CP/M 86 and sticking to Z80 stuff but
    C128 Alive is a beautiful forum to use and a great resource to be
    aware of if you are dabbling in anything C128 related. Here's that
    link:

    http://landover.no-ip.com/forums/


    Bill Buckels
    bbuckels@escape.ca

  2. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 14:13:09 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels:

    > I have recently added a number of CPM compilers to the Aztec C
    > Website.


    This might be the wrong newsgroup to ask but someone must have heard of
    these people; Computer Innovations who released their C86 compiler for
    the MSDOS (and quite possibly CP/M as well).

    I'm asking because I need to track down a copy for cross
    compiling Minix 1.1 on a MSDOS platform.
    --
    http://www.munted.org.uk

    Fearsome grindings.

  3. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 7, 5:57*am, Alex Buell wrote:
    > On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 14:13:09 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    > message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels


    I have been avoiding you Alex. I saw your message about the Computer
    Innvovations stuff and not finding anything on the web myself I
    decided to hide.

    > This might be the wrong newsgroup to ask but someone must have heard of
    > these people; Computer Innovations who released their C86 compiler for
    > the MSDOS (and quite possibly CP/M as well).


    >
    > I'm asking because I need to track down a copy for cross
    > compiling Minix 1.1 on a MSDOS platform.
    > --http://www.munted.org.uk
    >
    > Fearsome grindings.


    Yeah, I remember the joy of booting Minix on my old 286. A whole unix
    system on a single floppy. Oh my but we thought we were cool back then
    didn't we?

    So now begs the question... why can't you compile Minix on something
    else. How many lines of code is it? It might be just somewhat quicker
    than searching all over the globe for a compiler that nobody else
    used, or at least not anyone I know of right now. Seems to me I had
    minix somewhere too. Why exactly is it that we want to do this anyway?

    I hear the knashing of teeth as you hotly pursue this topic but at the
    end of the day let's have a look at the code and see exactly how much
    work it is to port and maybe we can port it to cpm first then to dos
    and then it'll be on topic. I would rather just port it to MS-DOS
    though and since MS-DOS C code is my middle-name (or was in the late
    80's) you might want to just email me privately with the source and
    I'll take a look.

    Just a thought.

    Bill

  4. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 7, 1:20 pm, Bill Buckels wrote:
    > I hear the knashing of teeth as you hotly pursue this topic but at the
    > end of the day let's have a look at the code and see exactly how much
    > work it is to port and maybe we can port it to cpm first then to dos
    > and then it'll be on topic.


    Yes, a CP/M Plus Port, so it'll be on topic in both of the newsgroups.
    Or cross-compiling Minix for a 286 using a CP/M Plus system ... a
    little more tenuous, but still an application.

    (And weren't they porting Linux to non-MMU processors like the 286?
    That'd be GPL. And there's always Coherent (h/t Udo Monk)
    ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/pub/coherent/

    So many options, so little time!)



  5. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Mon, 7 Apr 2008 10:20:33 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels:

    > On Apr 7, 5:57Â*am, Alex Buell wrote:
    > > On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 14:13:09 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    > > message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels

    >
    > I have been avoiding you Alex. I saw your message about the Computer
    > Innvovations stuff and not finding anything on the web myself I
    > decided to hide.


    Oh, really?

    > I hear the knashing of teeth as you hotly pursue this topic but at the
    > end of the day let's have a look at the code and see exactly how much
    > work it is to port and maybe we can port it to cpm first then to dos
    > and then it'll be on topic. I would rather just port it to MS-DOS
    > though and since MS-DOS C code is my middle-name (or was in the late
    > 80's) you might want to just email me privately with the source and
    > I'll take a look.


    I've decided on some advice, to get hold of the sources for Minix 1.3,
    the process should be much easier.

    Regards,
    Alex
    --
    http://www.munted.org.uk

    Fearsome grindings.

  6. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 7, 2:50*pm, Alex Buell wrote:
    > > I have been avoiding you Alex. I saw your message about the Computer
    > > Innvovations stuff and not finding anything on the web myself I
    > > decided to hide.

    >
    > Oh, really?


    No.

    > I've decided on some advice, to get hold of the sources for Minix 1.3,
    > the process should be much easier.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Alex
    > --http://www.munted.org.uk
    >
    > Fearsome grindings.


    I am coding at the moment and those grindings are really annoying. Can
    you tone it down Dropped by the website for second. Thanks for the
    link.

    Anyway... I have some more CP/M 80 compilers that I have to get ready.
    That'll be be 5 altogether on the Aztec C site, and I also need to get
    some other CP/M 86 stuff on there as well (which is OT in half these
    groups) so I would be just as thankful not to need to do any
    additional coding for awhile, becuase I need to code some sample, and
    at least until I get caught-up with my income tax returns and stuff.
    Bad time of the year.

    But the offer is open nonetheless. You need to tell us why you are
    doing Minix tho'

    I'd even forgot about its existence... must be old age.

    Bill


  7. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 7, 5:57*am, Alex Buell wrote:
    > On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 14:13:09 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    > message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels:
    >
    > > I have recently added a number of CPM compilers to the Aztec C
    > > Website.

    >
    > This might be the wrong newsgroup to ask but someone must have heard of
    > these people; Computer Innovations who released their C86 compiler for
    > the MSDOS (and quite possibly CP/M as well).
    >
    > I'm asking because I need to track down a copy for cross
    > compiling Minix 1.1 on a MSDOS platform.
    > --http://www.munted.org.uk
    >
    > Fearsome grindings.


    There's a version for cp/m-86 in COMPUPRO.ZIP,
    http://www.retroarchive.org/cpm/os/os.htm
    "
    Computer Innovations, Inc
    75 Pine Street,
    Lincroft, NJ 07738
    10/30/82

    RELEASE NOTES V1.31

    This version fixes minor problems in CC1, LIBR, and the library
    routines strncpy and realloc. We have also added a trig library.
    We suggest that you check all trig functions before use. Our tests
    were not as complete as we would like. If you do test a trig
    function,
    would you please let us know if it produces correct results. We
    assume
    that we will be notified of any errors.

    To write the trig library we used the book "Software Manual for the
    Elementary Functions" by Cody and Waite. It is an excellent book,
    providing flowcharts, constants, and test programs for the functions.
    We do not remember enough Math to do it justice. Publisted by
    Prentice-Hall.
    "
    Doubtful the .obj files are cross linkable, who knows?

    Steve

  8. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On 2008-04-07, BruceMcF wrote:
    >
    > (And weren't they porting Linux to non-MMU processors like the 286?


    I'm not aware of a port for the 286, but I haven't been paying all
    that much attention. uC/Linux is quite popular in the non-MMU ARM world.

    For a while, there was a project called elks to port Linux to 8086. I'm
    not sure of the status; I haven't seen anything about it in ages.
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  9. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 7, 10:54 pm, Roger Ivie wrote:
    > For a while, there was a project called elks to port Linux to 8086. I'm
    > not sure of the status; I haven't seen anything about it in ages.


    ELKS ... yes, Embeddable Linux Kernal System ... found their current
    wesbite, looks like they went into hibernation from about mid-2003,
    woke up again enough to clean some things up and issue news in 2006,
    and that looks like its about as far as its gone ... from alpha to
    beta in a mere five years, and possibly beta forever.

    In any event, 80286 was an original target ... from the FAQ (probably
    2002 text):

    Q1.1. What is ELKS?

    ELKS is the Embeddable Linux Kernel Subset, a project to build a small
    kernel subset of Linux (which will provide more or less UNIX V7
    functionality within the kernel) that can run on machines with limited
    processor and memory resources. More information on the background,
    goals and current status of the project can be found at the ELKS home
    page.

    The initial proposed targets are the Intel 8086 and eventually the
    286's 16-bit protected mode. A kernel that can run on this kind of
    hardware is useful for embedded systems projects, for third world
    deployment where 80x86 x>0 machines are not easily available, and for
    use on various palmtops.

    .... but since 8086 is still beta at best, "eventually" seems likely to
    be never.


  10. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    I have added two more compilers to the Aztec C Website. These have
    been around awhile and you may have them, but if not fill yer hand
    bucko!

    http://www.clipshop.ca/Aztec/index.htm#cpm80


    Manx Aztec C80
    Version 1.05f
    Developer System
    for CP/M-80
    Target: Z80 and 8080 Native Code

    CP/M-80 native mode development environment for Z80 and compatible
    computers. Comes with MyZ80 diskimage preconfigured with compiler and
    example.

    az80105f.zip with MyZ80 .DSK Image


    Manx Aztec C80
    Version 1.06b
    Developer System
    for CP/M-80
    Target: Z80 and 8080 Native Code

    CP/M-80 native mode development environment for Z80 and compatible
    computers. Comes with MyZ80 diskimage preconfigured with compiler and
    example.

  11. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    /* TEXTVU (C) Copyright Bill Buckels 1990 - 2008. All rights reserved.
    */
    /* loader and demo for .ANS, .TXT, .PTX, or .BSV files in aztec C
    */

    /* this version compiles and runs in MS-DOS or CP/M 86 */

    /* these files can be created in the THEDRAW or in GWBASIC, etc.
    */
    /* this program turns off the cursor, loads the file, waits for a
    */
    /* key press then turns the cursor on and returns the key value as
    */
    /* an exit code. It can be used as a slide show driver or batch menu.
    */

    #include
    /* one of my headers */
    #include

    #define SCREENSIZE 4000
    unsigned int SCREENSEG=0xb000;

    /* read buffers */
    char packbuf[SCREENSIZE];
    char databuf[SCREENSIZE];

    /* a microsoft compatible bsaved image format descriptor */
    char
    bsave_header[7]={'\xfd','\x00','\xb8','\x00','\x00','\xA0','\x0F' };

    /* for verification... check the first 2 bytes only!

    the marker byte 0xfd is followed by 3 intel 16 bit integers
    giving originating segment, offset, and filelength of the image.

    the segment was not always b800 and on a monochrome display
    including a hercules would be b000 but the offset was generally 0.

    The filelength can vary here but the first 5 bytes are
    pretty much invariant. As far as length these were 4000 bytes
    or up to 4096 bytes (with the last up to 96 bytes being unused)
    not including the 7 byte header and BASIC's ubiquituous
    [CTRL]-Z (0x1a) footer (which was reminiscent of the early x86 file
    systems
    but wasn't always present at the end of these either depending on
    who and how).

    The header above is for a CGA mode text screen of 4000 bytes.

    */

    /* the header fragment below is part of the header for
    a run length encoded ptx text screen */
    char ptx_header[4]={'\x00','\x03','\x01','\x10'};

    /* K & R style function body */
    main(argc, argv)
    int argc;
    char **argv;
    {

    union REGS inregs, outregs;
    struct SREGS sregs;

    int fh,i;

    unsigned int byteoff=0,secondoff=1,packet;
    unsigned char byte,bytecount;
    int wordcount,target;
    unsigned int status = 0;


    if (argc < 2) {
    printf("Usage: textvu [my.bsv]\n");
    exit(1);
    }

    fh = open(argv[1],O_RDONLY);

    if (fh == -1) {
    printf("Unable to open %s!\n",argv[1]);
    exit(1);
    }

    sysint(0x11,&inregs,&outregs); /* get equipment list from the bios
    */
    /* get display type (bits 4 and 5 of ax) */
    if ((outregs.x.ax & 0x30) < 0x30)SCREENSEG=0xb800;


    /* clearscreen and turn cursor off */

    /*
    Function 06h: Scroll Text Lines Up Scrolls part or all of the
    current display page up by one or more text lines. This
    function can also be used to clear part or all of the screen.

    Inputs

    AH = 06h

    AL = Number of lines to be scrolled up (AL = 00h will clear
    the window).

    BH = Color attribute for blank lines. In text mode, this
    corresponds to the attribute byte. In VGA graphics modes, this
    is the color number to which all the pixels in the blank lines
    will be set. In text mode the high nibble contains the text
    background and the low nibble the text color (bg << 4 | color).
    Background is in the range of 0-7 and color 0-15. Background
    of over 8-15 sets the blink attribute on the color display.
    Colors of 7-15 is the equivalent of adding high intensity
    to colors 0-7. The same holds true for determining what
    background the blink will be set to. Monochrome screens behave
    somewhat differently and generally the colors will be messed-up
    if a monochrome text color scheme is displayed on a color display
    or vice-versa, so these values were historically assigned
    independently
    or a simple text color scheme was used which suited both.

    CH = Top row of window to be scrolled up.
    CL = Leftmost column of window.

    DH = Bottom row of window.
    DL = Rightmost column of window.

    */
    inregs.x.ax = 0x0600;
    inregs.x.bx = 0x0f00; /* black background, bwhite text */
    inregs.x.cx = 0;
    inregs.h.dh = 24;
    inregs.h.dl = 79;
    sysint(0x10,&inregs,&outregs);

    /*
    Function 02h: Set Cursor Position Moves the cursor to the specified
    position on the screen. The video hardware maintains a separate
    cursor for
    each display page, and the cursor will move only if the page number
    given
    in BH is the current display page. Giving a position that is off the
    screen will cause the cursor to disappear from the screen.

    Inputs

    AH = 02h

    BH = Display page (valid only in text modes--use 00h for graphics
    modes).

    DH = Row (00h is top row).

    DL = Column (00h is leftmost column).

    */
    inregs.x.ax = 0x0200;
    inregs.x.bx = 0;
    inregs.x.dx = 0;
    sysint(0x10,&inregs,&outregs);

    /*
    Function 01h: Define Cursor Appearance Sets the starting and ending
    lines
    of the screen cursor, and can also be used to make the cursor
    invisible.
    In some modes, the characters are not exactly 8 lines high in these
    cases
    the graphics hardware will adapt the input values to the current
    character
    size.

    Inputs

    AH = 01h

    CH = Starting line of cursor (0-7). Add 20h to make the cursor
    invisible.

    CL = Ending line of cursor (0-7).
    */

    inregs.x.ax = 0x0100;
    inregs.x.cx = 0x2000;
    sysint(0x10,&inregs,&outregs);

    read(fh,databuf,7);

    /* beginning of run raw */
    if(databuf[0]== bsave_header[0] && databuf[1]== bsave_header[1])
    {
    read(fh,databuf,SCREENSIZE);
    close(fh);
    status = 1;
    }
    else if(databuf[0]==ptx_header[0] && databuf[1]==ptx_header[1] &&
    databuf[2]==ptx_header[2] && databuf[3]==ptx_header[3])
    {
    /* beginning of run length encoded */
    status = 1;
    read(fh,databuf,121);/* blow the rest of the header */
    target = read(fh,packbuf,SCREENSIZE);
    close(fh);

    wordcount=0;
    do{ bytecount=1; /* start with a seed count */
    byte=packbuf[wordcount];
    wordcount++;
    /* check to see if its raw */
    if(0xC0 == (0xC0 &byte)){ /* if its not, run encoded */
    bytecount= 0x3f &byte;
    byte=packbuf[wordcount];
    wordcount++;
    }
    for(packet=0;packet if(byteoff databuf[byteoff]=byte;
    byteoff+=2;
    }
    else{
    databuf[secondoff]=byte;
    secondoff+=2;
    }
    }

    }while(wordcount }

    if (status ==0) {
    /* begin run cooked */
    for (i = 0; i < 7; i++) {
    putchar(databuf[i]);
    }
    target = read(fh,databuf,SCREENSIZE);
    for (i = 0; i < target; i++)putchar(databuf[i]);
    close(fh);

    }
    else {
    /* we are in small memory model so need to get the segment
    that we are running-in to move image data direct
    to the CGA screen address... */
    segread(&sregs);

    /* note that I am using the ds register value with
    the datasegment address of my near pointer
    for my image data buffer as the base address for
    the source of my memory block move... */
    movblock(&databuf[0],sregs.ds,0,SCREENSEG,SCREENSIZE);

    }

    /* wait for a key press */
    /* use sysint to generate int 16h */

    inregs.x.ax = 0x0000;
    inregs.x.dx = 0x0000;
    sysint(0x16,&inregs,&outregs);
    /* return the low order char */
    status = outregs.x.ax&0x00ff;

    exit(status);

    }

  12. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website


    "BruceMcF" wrote in message
    news:fb4bc2c7-0e96-446c-9acc-24acd4b5717f@k13g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
    > On Apr 7, 1:20 pm, Bill Buckels wrote:
    > > I hear the knashing of teeth as you hotly pursue this topic but at the
    > > end of the day let's have a look at the code and see exactly how much
    > > work it is to port and maybe we can port it to cpm first then to dos
    > > and then it'll be on topic.

    >
    > Yes, a CP/M Plus Port, so it'll be on topic in both of the newsgroups.
    > Or cross-compiling Minix for a 286 using a CP/M Plus system ... a
    > little more tenuous, but still an application.
    >

    How about UZI180 ? That was compiled under cp/m using HiTech-C.

    Now if only it could run under z80 Pack (..hint..hint ..grin) !!

    > (And weren't they porting Linux to non-MMU processors like the 286?
    > That'd be GPL. And there's always Coherent (h/t Udo Monk)
    > ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/pub/coherent/
    >
    > So many options, so little time!)
    >
    >




  13. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 11, 6:44*pm, "Max Scane" wrote:
    > How about UZI180 ? *That was compiled under cp/m using HiTech-C.
    >
    > Now if only it could run under z80 Pack (..hint..hint ..grin) !!
    >


    THAT was a cool suggestion!

    But there is no need to do this then.

    http://uzix.sourceforge.net/index.ph...=links&lang=us

    UZI - UNIX Zilog Implementation
    The original UZI operating system by Douglas Braun.

  14. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    I have added another Aztec C Compiler to the Aztec C Website.

    This compiler produces both MS-DOS and CP/M 86 Programs in MS-DOS
    Mode. Some of you have this compiler already.

    Aztec C86 for the 8086
    Version 3.4b
    Compiler Aztec C 8086 3.40a 7-3-86
    (C) 1982,83,84,85 by Manx Software Systems, Inc.
    Rebundled for Windows XP

    Aztec C86 Version 3.4b Complete

    This is a completely installed version of the Manx Aztec C86 Version
    3.4b MS-DOS development environment for the 8086 processor. Support
    for CP/M 86 is also included in this version.

    The build environment has been configured to run under Windows XP and
    a pre-configured shortcut has been provided for this purpose. Several
    sample programs are also provided, each with its own MAKEFILE and each
    can be reviewed for information on how to write your own
    programs.Unzip the ZIP file with directories intact onto the root of
    your C: Drive. The Windows XP shortcut has been pre-configured to use
    this directory structure.

    Open the C:\az8634b folder in MyComputer and click-on the shortcut. A
    cmd window will open, and you will be in the C:\az8634b directory
    which is the parent directory for this environment. The required
    environment variables to build Aztec C MS-DOS programs are set for
    you, and you can build these anywhere on your computer from this cmd
    window.

    http://www.clipshop.ca/Aztec/index.htm#msdos

  15. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Mon, 7 Apr 2008 13:29:13 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this
    message magically appears in front of Bill Buckels:

    > But the offer is open nonetheless. You need to tell us why you are
    > doing Minix tho'


    For the fun of it! I've now succeeded in getting the kernel and its
    attendants mkfs, fsck and executables to build and boot. It will take a
    little longer to get it up and running though.
    --
    http://www.munted.org.uk

    Fearsome grindings.

  16. Re: CP/M 80 and CP/M 86 Compilers Recently Added to Aztec C Website

    On Apr 13, 3:50*am, Alex Buell wrote:
    > On Mon, 7 Apr 2008 13:29:13 -0700 (PDT), I waved a wand and this


    > For the fun of it! I've now succeeded in getting the kernel and its
    > attendants mkfs, fsck and executables to build and boot. It will take a
    > little longer to get it up and running though.
    > --http://www.munted.org.uk
    >
    > Fearsome grindings.


    I visited the website but didn't see minix up yet...

    The world is patiently waiting.

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