Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M - CP/M

This is a discussion on Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M - CP/M ; Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2 Some I have found: 0931988217 Z80 Assembly Language Programming - Lance A. Leventhal 0931988918 Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

  1. Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly
    language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2

    Some I have found:

    0931988217 Z80 Assembly Language Programming - Lance A. Leventhal
    0931988918 Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines - Lance A. Leventhal
    0810451670 Z-80 and 8080 assembly language programming Kathe Spracklen
    0830606564 The programming guide to the Z80 chip - Phillip R Robinson
    0131882503 CP/M Assembly Language Programming - Ken Barbier
    0810452103 Introduction to CP/M assembly language - Jon Lindsay

    Anyone familiar with these that can chime in?
    Of if there is a classic favorite that I am not finding, I would of course
    appreciate it's mention!

    I found Judi Fernandez' 8080/8085 Assembly book, and Rodney Zak's
    "Programming the Z80" (Radio Shack version) in my garage. Referring to the
    8080 book, most, if not all, of my machines have a Z80 so I'd like to
    concentrate on the Zilog flavor.

    For later on, I already have:

    The Programmer's CP/M Handbook
    CP/M Programmer's Encyclopaedia

    I got those as I saw them come up on fleaBay.

    I'd like to get the right book in the next day or two, as I am traveling
    for 2 weeks beginning next Friday, and would love to take it with me.

    For more info, I would like to get to the point where I can do alterations,
    and bring up CP/M on systems that don;t have it, or add GIDE to systems,
    etc.

    For MORE background, to aid in recommendations, what I currently have, and
    will want to tinker with (All Z80-based at present):

    Osborne 1's and Exec's
    Morrow MD3's
    Kaypro 2x, 2/84, 4/84, 10/83, 10/84
    Otrona Attache

    Tony


    sharkonwheels@g|\/|ail.com

  2. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Tony wrote:

    > Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly
    > language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2


    I have never understood why people insist on programming the Z-80,
    since CP/M 2.2 is written in 8080. In fact, except Turbo Pascal, all
    the major programs I know for CP/M (including M80 and ZSID!) are
    written in 8080...

    > Some I have found:


    Waow! You have more than me, who disassembled ZSID!

    > 0931988918 Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines - Lance A. Leventhal


    This one is likely to be very, very used, if you do anything with the
    Z-80.

    > Or, if there is a classic favorite that I am not finding, I would of course
    > appreciate it's mention!


    You don't mention "macros". If you were to use macros (the best
    explanation I know of them in the "MAC User's Guide", a 8080 program!
    The M80 doc is awful. Ha, by the way, the standard Z-80 assembler is
    M80, but SLR's Z80ASM is 4 times faster, but not standard.), I could
    give you 2 very, very good references.

    > For more info, I would like to get to the point where I can do alterations,
    > and bring up CP/M on systems that don't have it, or add GIDE to systems, etc.


    Ha! So, this is your real motive. Then, the problem is that you will
    need all the technical documentation of the chips ("data sheets") that
    you are going to use. The, read them and understand them. This could
    take quite some time. In the case of GIDE, Tilmann Reh wrote some code
    for his CPU280, but, as far as I know, nobody managed to make it run,
    for example, on Amstrad CPC6128 and PCW8256...

    For your purpose, "The Programmer's CP/M Handbook" by Andy Laird-
    Johnson will probably be indispensable. You are lucky: a few years
    ago, the source code of his floppy disks was saved.

    As a programmer, I find the electronics part difficult to deal with.
    There is a definite different way of thinking, whether you are dealing
    with software or hardware. (All the hardware freaks I know use Forth,
    rather than assembly language. It is quite amazing how little assembly
    language subroutines they use, thanks to this high-level interactive
    compiler. The problem is that everything is in "Reverse Polish
    Notation", but they tell me that it is quite natural, for them...)

    Anyway, good luck!

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr Emmanuel Roche


  3. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net wrote in
    news:108f17e7-a514-4f97-9525-c152158d8647@f63g2000hsf.googlegroups.com:

    > Tony wrote:
    >
    >> Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80
    >> assembly language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M
    >> 2.2

    >
    > I have never understood why people insist on programming the Z-80,
    > since CP/M 2.2 is written in 8080. In fact, except Turbo Pascal, all
    > the major programs I know for CP/M (including M80 and ZSID!) are
    > written in 8080...
    >
    >> Some I have found:

    >
    > Waow! You have more than me, who disassembled ZSID!
    >


    Just in case, I want to comment, that I have NOT acquired that entire list.
    What I meant, was that those are books that I had found for purchase...

    I do mention in the OP the ones I already own, either acquired
    individually, or have come with other purchases, etc...


    Tony


    sharkonwheels -at- g|\/|ail.com

  4. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net wrote:
    > Tony wrote:
    >
    >> Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly
    >> language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2

    >
    > I have never understood why people insist on programming the Z-80,
    > since CP/M 2.2 is written in 8080. In fact, except Turbo Pascal, all
    > the major programs I know for CP/M (including M80 and ZSID!) are
    > written in 8080...
    >


    Hi Emmanuel,

    I am not really sure why you stated that here. After the first three or
    four years Intel had (a bit) success with the 8080, Zilog launched their
    Z80 and that processor was in fact a mega seller.
    So most of the CP/M compatible computer were Z80 compatible also.
    Why are you complaining then ?
    You will gain speed and elegance, because there are much more mnemonics
    to play with ;-)

    Regards
    Peter

    --
    * Try http://www.z80.eu for CP/M computer and software infos.

  5. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Hello, Peter!

    > I am not really sure why you stated that here. After the first three or
    > four years Intel had (a bit) success with the 8080, Zilog launched their
    > Z80 and that processor was in fact a mega seller.
    > So most of the CP/M compatible computer were Z80 compatible also.
    > Why are you complaining then ?
    > You will gain speed and elegance, because there are much more mnemonics
    > to play with ;-)


    The Z-80 was a "mega seller" because:

    1) it simplified (before the 8085) the building of microcomputers (the
    hardware)

    2) it was compatible with the 8080 (the software)

    "Most of the CP/M-compatible computers were Z-80 compatible, also."
    No: it was the Z-80 which was compatible (except the famous NMI
    falling at 0066H, in the "Page Zero" of CP/M... You will notice that
    NOT ONE CP/M system ever used the Z-80 NMI!) with "CP/M-compatible
    computers" (that is to say: 8080 systems using the S-100 Bus and 8"
    floppy disks), not the other way round.

    "Why are you complaining, then?" I am not complaining, I am just
    remarking that all the Newbies I have known wanted to learn the Z-80,
    while all the software written for CP/M was written in 8080...

    "You will gain speed and elegance, because there are much more
    mnemonics to play with!" I am afraid that you never wrote or
    disassembled an assembler or a debugger. All the one-byte long opcodes
    are already taken by the 8080, so the Z-80 opcodes are, inherently,
    slower than 8080 opcodes. In addition, Zilog was slow to release any
    technical doc, so I know of at least FOUR incompatible mnemonics sets
    that were widely used (ever heard about the mythical TDL Z-80 macro-
    assembler? It was tape-based...). Also, the indexed IX and IY opcodes
    are 1) not documented, 2) badly designed, as I discovered when
    disassembling ZSID. Finally, from a technical viewpoint, you need TWO
    LINES per opcode to display what is happening to the registers. That
    means that a screen contains half he information it is able to display
    for a 8080 program being debugged. As a result, the programmer is
    sooner overcome by "information overload". The alternate register set
    ease the progamming of a BIOS, that's all. You would be surprised, if
    you disassembled Turbo Pascal, to see how few times they are used...

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr Emmanuel Roche


  6. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    On Sat, 15 Mar 2008 05:58:47 -0700 (PDT), roche182@laposte.net wrote:

    >Hello, Peter!
    >
    >> I am not really sure why you stated that here. After the first three or
    >> four years Intel had (a bit) success with the 8080, Zilog launched their
    >> Z80 and that processor was in fact a mega seller.
    >> So most of the CP/M compatible computer were Z80 compatible also.
    >> Why are you complaining then ?
    >> You will gain speed and elegance, because there are much more mnemonics
    >> to play with ;-)

    >
    >The Z-80 was a "mega seller" because:
    >
    >1) it simplified (before the 8085) the building of microcomputers (the
    >hardware)
    >
    >2) it was compatible with the 8080 (the software)
    >
    >"Most of the CP/M-compatible computers were Z-80 compatible, also."
    >No: it was the Z-80 which was compatible (except the famous NMI
    >falling at 0066H, in the "Page Zero" of CP/M... You will notice that
    >NOT ONE CP/M system ever used the Z-80 NMI!) with "CP/M-compatible
    >computers" (that is to say: 8080 systems using the S-100 Bus and 8"
    >floppy disks), not the other way round.


    8080 and 8" disks were actually very shortlived and Z80 and 5.25"
    floppies were dominent by 1980. we are talking from January 1976 for
    the first 8080 S100 (MITS) to december 1980 a mere 4 years
    and I'd say by mid 1978 systems sporting the 8080 were actually on a
    significant decline.

    CP/M compatable is a modern construct from the PC compatable mumbling.
    Back then it was system that had 20or 32K minimum from 0000h and had a
    floppy of some sort was CP/M compatable... if a commercial bios
    existed or the user could write their own.

    And there were systems that use NMI, it was often qualified as who
    cares about the default FCB when the power fails or other "emergency"
    happens or they allowed for a shadow rom to intercept the NMI linkage.
    It wasnt' common and rarely needed but existed.

    FYI: since I expenct you to insist I name one. TRS80 all versions.

    >"Why are you complaining, then?" I am not complaining, I am just
    >remarking that all the Newbies I have known wanted to learn the Z-80,
    >while all the software written for CP/M was written in 8080...


    Wrong! A great deal of software was written for Z80 on CP/M. Just
    because the OS was coded in 8080 there was nothing there to limit the
    user.

    >"You will gain speed and elegance, because there are much more
    >mnemonics to play with!" I am afraid that you never wrote or
    >disassembled an assembler or a debugger. All the one-byte long opcodes
    >are already taken by the 8080, so the Z-80 opcodes are, inherently,


    Wrong. There were several one byte holes. Also there are a great
    many asymetric holes in the base 8080 instruction set. the most
    annoying one to me was you can load the SP (LXI SP) but you cannot
    directly save it. Z80 fixed that! The fact that it needs an extra
    byte to specify that is no issue as assemblers are there for that.
    In many cases the extra byte was still better than the laborious 8080
    code and sometimes were faster expecially when you consider the 8080
    never got above 3mhz and the 4mhz z80 was available in 1978.

    >slower than 8080 opcodes. In addition, Zilog was slow to release any
    >technical doc, so I know of at least FOUR incompatible mnemonics sets


    Your kidding, right? I still have tech docs that were issued with the
    chip and also from the second source (mostek). They were very
    aware that without docs it was useless.

    >that were widely used (ever heard about the mythical TDL Z-80 macro-
    >assembler? It was tape-based...).


    There was also a version for CP/M that was very good and maybe better
    than ASM.

    However the there was the Zilog instruction set designed to be non
    copyright infringing with 8080 and then there were those deigned by
    non-zilog sources that were invented to suit the authors and also
    make it easy for those stuck in the 8080 realm (iMDS users!)..

    > Also, the indexed IX and IY opcodes
    >are 1) not documented, 2) badly designed, as I discovered when
    >disassembling ZSID. Finally, from a technical viewpoint, you need TWO


    They are documented, my 1978 books have them and it's pretty clear.
    There are some undocumented instructions that are unofficially there
    but were always reserved for future use (Z280 and later).

    >LINES per opcode to display what is happening to the registers. That
    >means that a screen contains half he information it is able to display
    >for a 8080 program being debugged. As a result, the programmer is
    >sooner overcome by "information overload". The alternate register set
    >ease the progamming of a BIOS, that's all. You would be surprised, if
    >you disassembled Turbo Pascal, to see how few times they are used...


    For badly designed its funny to see that the 8080 was dead or nearly
    so for new systems by 1980 and the z80 is still in production in 2008!

    Now, for every CPU there is a someone with the some set of peeves
    as those voiced... I heard the first ones grousing about the PDP-8
    long before CPUs were a chip. Bottom line the 8080 was first, and
    useable. It was not the be all end all even the 8085 was an
    significant improvement nor was it completely the same instruction
    set wise. The Z80 was a significant improvement for it's time and
    the only competitor was the 6502.. both were fast, one had a strong
    instruction set and the improved 8080 archetecture and the other was
    very low cost. The industry loved both and they lived longer than
    most any other.

    If you want a flame war on instruction sets then lets argue 8080 or
    even z80 against something like PDP-11 a contemporary of the
    both those and did make it's appearance around the same time
    in chip form.

    Allison

    >
    >Yours Sincerely,
    >Mr Emmanuel Roche



  7. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    On Sat, 15 Mar 2008 02:00:50 GMT, Tony
    wrote:

    >Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly
    >language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2
    >
    >Some I have found:
    >
    >0931988217 Z80 Assembly Language Programming - Lance A. Leventhal
    >0931988918 Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines - Lance A. Leventhal
    >0810451670 Z-80 and 8080 assembly language programming Kathe Spracklen
    >0830606564 The programming guide to the Z80 chip - Phillip R Robinson
    >0131882503 CP/M Assembly Language Programming - Ken Barbier
    >0810452103 Introduction to CP/M assembly language - Jon Lindsay


    Of these I'd recommend both of Leventhal's books

    >I found Judi Fernandez' 8080/8085 Assembly book, and Rodney Zak's
    >"Programming the Z80" (Radio Shack version) in my garage. Referring to the
    >8080 book, most, if not all, of my machines have a Z80 so I'd like to
    >concentrate on the Zilog flavor.

    Rodney Zaks' book is good reference

    >For later on, I already have:
    >
    >The Programmer's CP/M Handbook

    If this is the one by Andy Johnson-Laird, then good, otherwise
    try to find it.

    Jim

  8. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    On 2008-03-15, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > Also there are a great many asymetric holes in the base 8080
    > instruction set.


    My favorite is MOV M,M.
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  9. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    On Sat, 15 Mar 2008 19:43:29 GMT, Jim Korman
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 15 Mar 2008 02:00:50 GMT, Tony
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80 assembly
    >>language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for CP/M 2.2
    >>
    >>Some I have found:
    >>
    >>0931988217 Z80 Assembly Language Programming - Lance A. Leventhal
    >>0931988918 Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines - Lance A. Leventhal
    >>0810451670 Z-80 and 8080 assembly language programming Kathe Spracklen
    >>0830606564 The programming guide to the Z80 chip - Phillip R Robinson
    >>0131882503 CP/M Assembly Language Programming - Ken Barbier
    >>0810452103 Introduction to CP/M assembly language - Jon Lindsay

    >
    >Of these I'd recommend both of Leventhal's books
    >
    >>I found Judi Fernandez' 8080/8085 Assembly book, and Rodney Zak's
    >>"Programming the Z80" (Radio Shack version) in my garage. Referring to the
    >>8080 book, most, if not all, of my machines have a Z80 so I'd like to
    >>concentrate on the Zilog flavor.

    >Rodney Zaks' book is good reference
    >
    >>For later on, I already have:
    >>
    >>The Programmer's CP/M Handbook

    >If this is the one by Andy Johnson-Laird, then good, otherwise
    >try to find it.


    Yes it's AJL and that is a must ahve for anything CP/M either from the
    apps side or the OS/BIOS side.

    While they are a bit thin The DRI CP/M 2 manual set or one of the
    bound versions is a must have and reference.

    Allison

  10. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Tony wrote:
    >
    > Can I solicit some opinions / recommendations on learning Z80
    > assembly language? This would be geared towards Z80 assembly for
    > CP/M 2.2
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > I found Judi Fernandez' 8080/8085 Assembly book, and Rodney
    > Zak's "Programming the Z80" (Radio Shack version) in my garage.
    > Referring to the 8080 book, most, if not all, of my machines
    > have a Z80 so I'd like to concentrate on the Zilog flavor.


    I advise ignoreing the 8085 - its extensions over the 8080 never
    took hold. Z80's can run all 8080 code, provided that the code
    doesn't misuse the parity flag. So you are perfectly safe in
    thoroughly learning the 8080 instruction set, and only using the
    extended Z80 instructions when you want access to the extra
    registers etc. You can use either the 8080 extended mnemnonics
    (TDL set) or the z80 mnemnonics as you please, just not
    intermixed. DDTZ uses the TDL set for disassembly.

    Some CP/M code is available at:



    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  11. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Roger Ivie wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Also there are a great many asymetric holes in the base 8080
    >> instruction set.

    >
    > My favorite is MOV M,M.


    IIRC that is actually a HLT instruction. 76 hex, I believe.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  12. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net writes:


    >"Most of the CP/M-compatible computers were Z-80 compatible, also."
    >No: it was the Z-80 which was compatible (except the famous NMI
    >falling at 0066H, in the "Page Zero" of CP/M... You will notice that
    >NOT ONE CP/M system ever used the Z-80 NMI!)



    I do remember my first S100 Floppy-Controller (SD-Sales SD) which used
    IMHO the NMI for 'end of sector' indication. It saved some bytes at 0x66h,
    put some code there, did a read/write of the floppy and restored those
    bytes.
    I am not sure, but I think that the 2.5 MHz Kaypro used the same trick?

    -=-
    True, I did not dis-assemble ZSID (but found one bug and a patch[*]), but
    ZSID _has_ to use some Z80-opcodes; at least in the routine (just before)
    the Display of all the CPU-registers, including the extra Z80s.


    Greetings, Holger
    [*] According to http://retroarchive.org/cpm/cdrom/CPMINFO/CPMPATS6.TXT
    it was DrDobbs Journal, Dec. 1981, p. 4; but I can't find this issue
    in my pile of old paper... If anyone could scan the small part?




  13. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net wrote:
    : No: it was the Z-80 which was compatible (except the famous NMI
    : falling at 0066H, in the "Page Zero" of CP/M... You will notice that
    : NOT ONE CP/M system ever used the Z-80 NMI!)

    The Amstrad PCW does - for the floppy controller. Between the gate array
    and the BIOS, it makes sure that the NMI only ever happens while the NMI
    handler (in bank 0) is paged in.

    --
    John Elliott

    Thinks: This is what a nice clean life leads to. Hmm, why did I ever lead one?
    -- Bluebottle, in the Goon Show

  14. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Hello, everybody!

    1) Yes, I was quick in saying that "NOT ONE CP/M system used the
    NMI"... However, remember that I am writing from a cybercafe, not for
    an Encyclopaedia! And, there were about 3,000 CP/M systems built and
    sold... Now, what is the percentage of those that used the NMI? I am
    pretty sure that it was less than 1% (note that I don't say 0%...).

    2) Regarding ZSID, I did ZSID Version 2.5 for MP/M II. To test it, I
    was obliged to create a 20-pages source file, in order to test the 820
    (or 916? I don't remember) instructions. After having this experience
    with such a CISC, I was confirmed with my preference of the 8080
    instruction set. (It is also me who published on the comp.os.cpm
    Newsgroup the smallest BASIC Z-80 "disassembler" ever made.
    (Personally, I prefer the term "lister".) So, I have experience with
    the Z-80 from assembly language and high-level language. In both, the
    Zilog mnemonics are harder to translate to/from code than the Intel
    mnemonics. However, I realize that all my (technical) arguments will
    not change the minds of Z-80 masochists!)

    3) This will be all.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr Emmanuel Roche


  15. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Below is the READ.ME file (available at http://www.cpm.z80.de/source.html
    Ethernal thanks to Jack Rubin for uploading them! No need to retype
    and debug them!) of:
    The Programmer's CP/M Handbook Source Code Examples
    Version 1.0 August 18, 1983
    (c) 1983 Johnson-Laird Inc.

    We have tried to include as many of the examples from the CP/M
    Programmer's Handbook as was possible to fit onto 2 single-sided
    single-density diskettes (or alternately, 1 single-density
    double-sided "flippy" diskette). Our original intention was to
    include the source code for every figure in the book as well as all
    the example listings in Chapter 5. Since this proved to be
    impossible
    to fit onto two diskettes, we have chosen those figures and examples
    which we felt would be the most useful. The only major omission is
    Figure 9-4 which deals with bad sector management.

    We have fixed one bug and added one line to Figure 8-10. This is
    noted in the source code. The lines which were left out in the book
    after page 261 are also included. You may notice some minor
    differences in capitalization, indentation, etc. in the comments
    where
    we have not included changes made in copyediting.

    We would appreciate hearing from you, especially about any bugs,
    typos, other horrible goofs, suggestions for improvements.

    Contents of Diskette No 1

    Filename Page No. Figure Title

    FIG5-2.ASM 70 Equates for BDOS function code numbers
    FIG5-3.ASM 74 Write console byte example, output null-byte
    terminated message from specified address
    FIG5-4.ASM 74 Write console byte example, output null-byte
    terminated message following call to subroutine
    FIG5-5.ASM 76 Read line from reader device
    FIG5-6.ASM 78 Write line to punch device
    FIG5-7.ASM 79 Write line to list device
    FIG5-8.ASM 81 Read/Write string from/to console using raw I/O
    FIG5-10.ASM 86 IOBYTE equates
    FIG5-11.ASM 87 Simple terminal emulator
    FIG5-12.ASM 89 Display $-terminated message on console
    FIG5-13.ASM 92 Read console string for keyboard options
    FIG5-14.ASM 95 Determine the CP/M version number
    FIG5-15.ASM 96 Reset requested disk drive
    FIG5-16.ASM 100 Open file request
    FIG5-17.ASM 104 Search first/next calls for ambiguous filename
    FIG5-18.ASM 110 Read next character from sequential disk file
    FIG5-19.ASM 113 Write next character to sequential disk file
    FIG5-20.ASM 115 Create file request
    FIG5-21.ASM 117 Rename file request
    FIG5-22.ASM 122 Set file attributes
    FIG5-23.ASM 123 Get file attributes
    FIG5-24.ASM 126 Accessing disk parameter block data
    FUNCTN33.ASM 131 Example for function 33, read random
    FIG5-25.ASM 135 Create random file
    FIG5-26.ASM 136 Read/write variable length records randomly
    FIG6-4.ASM 159 Simple BIOS listing
    FIG7-5.ASM 191 Example PUTCP/M
    FIG7-7.ASM 198 Example CP/M cold bootstrap loader
    FIG8-6.ASM 226 Device table equates
    FIG10-5.ASM 363 Testbed for real time clock driver in the BIOS
    FIG10-6.ASM 365 Testbed for disk I/O drivers in the BIOS
    ERASE.C 410 Figure 11-3, requests confirmation before erasing
    UNERASE.C 412 Figure 11-4, "revives" erased files
    FIND.C 417 Figure 11-5, locates specific files or groups of
    files
    SPACE.C 420 Figure 11-6, displays how much disk storage is
    used
    or available
    MOVE.C 424 Figure 11-7, "moves" files from one user to
    another
    MAKE.C 428 Figure 11-8, makes files "invisible" and
    protected
    or makes them "visible," accessible and
    unprotected
    SPEED.C 431 Figure 11-9, sets the baud rate for a specific
    device
    PROTOCOL.C 435 Figure 11-10, sets the protocol governing input
    and output
    of a specified serial device
    ASSIGN.C 439 Figure 11-11, assigns a logical devices input and
    output
    to two or more physical devices
    DATE.C 443 Figure 11-12, makes the current date part of the
    system
    TIME.C 444 Figure 11-13, makes the current time part of the
    system
    FUNKEY.C 446 Figure 11-14, sets the character strings
    associated with
    specific function keys

    Contents of Diskette 2

    FIG8-10.ASM 237 Enhanced BIOS listing
    FIG9-5.ASM 312 User-friendly disk error processor
    FIG10-2.ASM 331 Debug subroutines
    FIG10-4.ASM 355 Testbed for character I/O drivers
    LIBRARY.C 372 Figure 11-1, commonly used functions in C
    LIBRARY.H 390 Figure 11-2, code to be included at the beginning
    of
    any program that calls LIBRARY functions in
    Figure 11-1



  16. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    On Mon, 17 Mar 2008 03:20:56 -0700 (PDT), roche182@laposte.net wrote:

    >Hello, everybody!
    >
    >1) Yes, I was quick in saying that "NOT ONE CP/M system used the
    >NMI"... However, remember that I am writing from a cybercafe, not for
    >an Encyclopaedia! And, there were about 3,000 CP/M systems built and
    >sold... Now, what is the percentage of those that used the NMI? I am
    >pretty sure that it was less than 1% (note that I don't say 0%...).



    More interesting to me is what percentage of those used the 8080 chip
    rather than something else.


    >2) Regarding ZSID, I did ZSID Version 2.5 for MP/M II. To test it, I
    >was obliged to create a 20-pages source file, in order to test the 820
    >(or 916? I don't remember) instructions. After having this experience
    >with such a CISC, I was confirmed with my preference of the 8080
    >instruction set. (It is also me who published on the comp.os.cpm
    >Newsgroup the smallest BASIC Z-80 "disassembler" ever made.
    >(Personally, I prefer the term "lister".) So, I have experience with
    >the Z-80 from assembly language and high-level language. In both, the
    >Zilog mnemonics are harder to translate to/from code than the Intel
    >mnemonics. However, I realize that all my (technical) arguments will
    >not change the minds of Z-80 masochists!)



    Actually your arguments aren't "technical;" they're emotional...
    rooted in a memory of what once was and you are so rigid in trying to
    force every detail of the good old days on us that you miss the simple
    fact that if it isn't fun few will be interested.

    You're on a mission. For the most part the rest of us aren't.


    >3) This will be all.
    >
    >Yours Sincerely,
    >Mr Emmanuel Roche


  17. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Holger Petersen writes:


    >[*] According to http://retroarchive.org/cpm/cdrom/CPMINFO/CPMPATS6.TXT
    > it was DrDobbs Journal, Dec. 1981, p. 4; but I can't find this issue
    > in my pile of old paper... If anyone could scan the small part?


    Thanks to some anonymous person, Holger

  18. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    Jim Higgins wrote:

    > Actually your arguments aren't "technical;" they're emotional...


    ??? Well, Jim, the 11 March 2003, in the "ATTN: Steve" thread, I
    published the source code of LISTZ80.BAS. (It is also me who provided
    the copy of ZSID Version 2.5 that is "floating" around...) (Me, I have
    the original 8" floppy disk, with the add-on photocopies from Digital
    Research!)

    So, if this is not the sortest possible Z-80 lister program possible
    in BASIC, you are challenged to publish, publicly, your smaller
    version...

    This is the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup, and the subject of this thread is
    the Z-80, so, go on, show us what you are able to do!

    (I wanted to finish my current 8080 programming (a 12K program) but,
    if challenged, I am ready to dive into my stuff and refind my 20-pages
    listing of Z-80 opcodes (I remember that Tilmann Reh as a copy of it),
    and start a thread about Z-80 listers in assembly language and BASIC.

    This way, we will know who is "technical", and who is "emotional"...

    Mr Emmanuel Roche


  19. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net wrote:
    > Jim Higgins wrote:
    >
    >> Actually your arguments aren't "technical;" they're emotional...

    >
    > ??? Well, Jim, the 11 March 2003, in the "ATTN: Steve" thread, I
    > published the source code of LISTZ80.BAS. (It is also me who provided
    > the copy of ZSID Version 2.5 that is "floating" around...) (Me, I have
    > the original 8" floppy disk, with the add-on photocopies from Digital
    > Research!)
    >
    > So, if this is not the sortest possible Z-80 lister program possible
    > in BASIC, you are challenged to publish, publicly, your smaller
    > version...
    >
    > This is the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup, and the subject of this thread is
    > the Z-80, so, go on, show us what you are able to do!


    Well, I am *not* sure this lister program (=disassembler I guess) is
    showing all secret opcodes of the Z80.
    Compare the results with the Z80 disassembler I can provide in source
    code too - but in 'C', a rather elegant programming language compared to
    BASIC, or ? It can be downloaded at http://www.z80.eu/z80itself.html
    (with an executable for DOS, so you need not to compile it by yourself).

    Regards
    Peter

    --
    * Try http://www.z80.eu for CP/M computer and software infos.

  20. Re: Z80 Assembly books related to CP/M

    roche182@laposte.net wrote in news:0cf7001a-a61c-4bd0-befb-
    c462bebb7ccf@e60g2000hsh.googlegroups.com:

    > http://www.cpm.z80.de/source.html
    >
    >FIG6-4.ASM 159 Simple BIOS listing


    Off the bat, FIG6-4.ASM is in listed in the README, but the file is not in
    the archive.


    Tony


    sharkonwheels -@t- g|\/|ail.com

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast