LLNL Library - CP/M

This is a discussion on LLNL Library - CP/M ; LLLEND.TXT ---------- Ok. We have now (as far as we know) recreated as exactly as possible a file containing the source code of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package. What was the difficulties? 1) The source code was available on ...

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Thread: LLNL Library

  1. Re: LLNL Library

    LLLEND.TXT
    ----------

    Ok. We have now (as far as we know) recreated as exactly as
    possible a file containing the source code of the Lawrence
    Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package.

    What was the difficulties?

    1) The source code was available on an old photocopy (that Grant
    Stockly found as a PDF file in the LLL Web site).

    2) It was (as usual) a very bad scan.

    3) The original source code was using radix octal.

    4) Since it was not a CP/M file, it was loading at 0900H in
    memory.

    The only advantage was that the file was containing the actual
    generated octal values, along with the source code (in CP/M
    jargon: it was a PRN file, not an ASM file).

    To be able to take advantage of the octal values and save on
    typing, I needed to modify one of my "poke byte values in
    memory" BASIC program, then modify it further to poke values at
    different memory locations than those displayed, so has not to
    damage the BASIC interpreter while it was running in the TPA of
    CP/M. Fortunately, this was easy to achieve. Producing this
    POCTAL.BAS program was the first step.

    The second step was then to actually enter those octal values in
    memory, then save them. Due to the length of the listing (32
    pages), this was done in several sessions at the computer. At
    the beginning, while developing POCTAL, I tried to save the
    contents of the memory with my SAVEHEX.BAS program, but there
    was a problem, so I went back to SID, the CP/M debugger.

    The steps involved were then: loading SID, loading BASIC,
    running BASIC, running POCTAL, leaving BASIC and going back to
    SID (the "magic formula" was published in the comp.os.cpm
    Newsgroup several years ago), then saving the area of memory
    containing the poked octal values. It is during one of those
    iterations that I saved by inadvertance one area of memory
    containing 00H bytes, instead of 1D-0B pairs. (Fortunately, it
    was localized in one area.)

    The third step was, of course, disassembling the resultant file.
    This was easily done with my favorite disassembler.

    Another step appeared because the original source code contained
    2 areas which were not purely code: one area containing the
    values of powers of ten, and a macro which was used 3 times.
    Just to be sure that the standard CP/M 8080 and Z-80 macro
    assemblers would produce exactly the same code as the unknown
    assembler used at LLL circa 1973-1975, I assembled and compared
    the outputs, then could conclude positively.

    The fifth step was then, of course, retyping all the comments
    found in the original source code. As usual, due to its length
    (32 pages), this was done in several sessions at the computer.
    One day, I finally came to the END.

    The Sixth step was then, of course, to "close the loop" by
    comparing the result of my recreated source code with the binary
    of the octal values that I had poked. It is then that several
    instances (6 or 7) of 00H bytes where found, followed by 3 typos
    due to the bad scan.

    The Seventh step was writing this memo, which could serve as a
    guide to anybody else wanting to recreate the file of the source
    code of an interesting old program. In this particular case, the
    program was written using octal, but the principles remain the
    same whatever the radix used.

    Since the first microcomputers were programmed by people
    familiar with DEC mini-computers, many of the oldest 8008 and
    8080 programs were written in octal. One well known example is
    "Tiny BASIC Texas" (TBX -- 2KB long), which was published as an
    octal dump by the ACM... ("Design Notes for Tiny BASIC", Denis
    Allison, "SIGPLAN Notices", Vol.11, No.7, pp.25-33) This could
    be an interesting programming project for any person interested
    in a 2KB (Tiny) BASIC. (Hint: Have also a look to the very
    first issues of DDJ...)

    (Charles "Restless" Richmond triumphally announced, while I was
    busy recreating the source code of LLLPPP, that he had found the
    source code of LLLPPP. Unfortunately, a comparaison of both
    files show that the one he found (in the Volume 2 of the
    Software Library of the CP/M User's Group, containing the source
    code of LLLBASIC) is, in fact, 59 bytes shorter -- the square
    root routine is missing. If you prefer octal, use it.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"


    EOF



  2. Re: LLNL Library

    French Luser wrote:

    > (Charles "Restless" Richmond triumphally announced, while I was
    > busy recreating the source code of LLLPPP, that he had found the
    > source code of LLLPPP. Unfortunately, a comparaison of both
    > files show that the one he found (in the Volume 2 of the
    > Software Library of the CP/M User's Group, containing the source
    > code of LLLBASIC) is, in fact, 59 bytes shorter -- the square
    > root routine is missing. If you prefer octal, use it.)


    So far, Roche has not posted his regenerated source listing, or the
    square root routine.

    All this got my attention. At this point, there are two accessable
    versions of
    the Lawrence Livermore Labs floating point package:

    http://www.retroarchive.org/cpm/cdro...G/CPMUG002.ARK

    I'll call this the "CPMUG file".

    PDF of LLNL document listing and describing that file at:

    http://www.llnl.gov/tid/lof/documents/pdf/171286.pdf

    as UCRL-51940, Floating Point Package for 8008 and 8080...
    Michael D Maples Oct 24 1975.

    I'll call this "LLNL listing".

    I took some time today to compare the two in a rough fashion. I found
    that the LLNL listing included the square root routine; the CPMUG file
    did not. But there are OTHER differences between the two, but I don't
    have time to make exhaustive checks. So here's what I'll do. I've
    created two files on my Web site:

    http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/lllfp_update.txt

    That's the differences I found so far. It includes the lost SQRT
    routine.

    http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/LLLFP.ASM

    That's the ASM file extracted from the CPMUG #2 archive as referenced
    above.

    Anyone wants to determine other differences besides the ones I noted,
    can email them to me. (DON'T use the "gmail" address, look at the end
    of this msg for my email address.) I'll update the "update" document
    accordingly. Emmanuel Roche AKA French Luser can look at the update and
    check his work as well.

    Someone else MIGHT want to scour the Web and other CPMUG archives, to
    see if an "update" was issued to this #2 disk to at the least include
    the square root routine. It may have already been fixed. Someone may
    want to read the code more throughly too, some of these fixes may be
    arbitrary.

    Herb Johnson

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    web site
    domain mirror
    my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
    "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
    S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"


  3. Re: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package Pseudo-PRN File

    Charles Richmond wrote:
    > French Luser wrote:
    >>
    >> Ok. Now that we have poked in RAM the values of the Lawrence
    >> Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package, how do we check
    >> that it corresponds, EXACTLY, to what the old photocopy of the
    >> source code contains?

    >
    > Hey Luser, what part of my previous post did you
    > *not* understand??? I found a .ARK file online
    > that *contains* the LLL Floating Point source code.
    >
    > Here is the information again:
    >
    > VOLUME 2 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC AND DISK TINY BASIC
    >
    > 2.1 84K LLLBASIC.ASM LLLBASIC INTERPRETER SOURCE
    > 2.2 38K LLLBASIC.COM SIMPLE PATCHED COM FOR CP/M
    > 2.3 2K LLLBASIC.DOC NOTES ON LLLBASIC
    > 2.4 61K LLLFP.ASM FLOATING-POINT PACKAGE FOR LLLBASIC
    > 2.5 2K LLLMON.ASM KLUGE MONITOR TO TEST LLL IN LLLBASIC.COM
    > 2.6 2K STARTREK.DOC COMMENTS ON STARTREK.TBI
    > 2.7 6K STARTREK.TBI TINY BASIC LOADABLE STARTREK
    > 2.8 3K TINYBAS.COM SHERRY version WANG PALO ALTO TINY BASIC,
    > 2.9 13K TINYBAS.DOC FULL INSTRUCTIONS FOR TINYBAS
    >
    > This can be downloaded as an .ARK file from:
    >
    > http://www.retroarchive.org/cpm/cdro...G/CPMUG002.ARK
    >
    > The LLLFP.ASM is the source file I think that you are inputting
    > by hand/finger.


    I vaguely remember a very early Basic system for the 8080 that I
    tried. This was before Gates et cie released their first basic on
    paper tape. What I found was that that system elided all blanks in
    the source, so that the store programs were totally unreadable. Is
    that the same system. Probably around 1975 or so. It predated
    CP/M.

    --
    Some informative links:








  4. Re: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package Pseudo-PRN File

    On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 11:53:56 -0500, Charles Richmond
    wrote:


    >Hey Luser, what part of my previous post did you
    >*not* understand??? I found a .ARK file online
    >that *contains* the LLL Floating Point source code.
    >
    >Here is the information again:
    >
    >
    >VOLUME 2 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC AND DISK TINY BASIC
    >
    >2.1 84K LLLBASIC.ASM LLLBASIC INTERPRETER SOURCE


    When I got MY copy of the CPMUG002 disk, sometime around maybe 1980,
    it contained a Catalog.2 that reads like THIS:

    = VOLUME 2
    =
    = LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC AND DISK TINY BASIC
    =
    = NOTE THAT IMPROVED IMPLEMENTATIONS OF LLLBASIC AND DISK
    = TINY BASIC NOW ARE PRESENT ON VOLUMES 10 AND 11 RESPECTIVELY
    =
    = NUMBER SIZE NAME COMMENTS
    =
    = CATALOG.2 CONTENTS OF CP/M VOLUME 2
    = 2.1 84K LLLBASIC.ASM LLLBASIC INTERPRETER SOURCE

    I don't know where you got yours, or when, but I assure you mine (and
    the above quoted portion) is directly traceable to CPMUG, about 25
    years ago or so. Copy from librarian George Coyne, the CP/M Users
    Group of Minnesota club copy.

    Maybe Richmond simply overlooked it, or left it out?

    Those interested in this thread may find it instructive to check for
    differences.

    Because I have ORIGINAL copies, nothing later redacted has been
    removed. I will give copies to anyone of any redacted material solely
    for educational use. You may not USE any such copies to actually
    operate your computer. I am interested in preserving an accurate
    history.

    Bill

  5. Re: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package doc

    On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 13:37:14 +0200, French Luser
    wrote:

    >
    >LLLFP.WS4
    >---------
    >
    >Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point (LLLFP) package
    >
    >Original title:
    >
    >- "Floating-Point Package for Intel 8008 and 8080 Microprocessors"
    > Michael D. Maples
    > Lawrence Livermore Laboratory,
    > University of California/Livermore, California 94550,
    > October 24, 1975
    >
    >(Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)


    Sorry, Emmanuel, maybe I've been dozing off ....

    VOLUME 10

    LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC INTERFACED TO CP/M
    WITH DISK LOAD OF PROGRAMS

    THESE PROGRAMS REPLACE THE VERSIONS ISSUED ON
    CP/M USERS' GROUP VOLUME 2

    NUMBER SIZE NAME COMMENTS

    1K CATALOG.10 CONTENTS OF CP/M GROUP VOL 10
    4K LLLBASIC.DOC COMMENTS ON PROGRAMS IN VOLUME 10
    10.1 85K LLLBASIC.ASM SEE LLLBASIC.DOC
    10.2 7K LLLBASIC.COM TOTAL ASSEMBLED PACKAGE
    10.3 61K LLLFP.ASM SEE LLLBASIC.DOC
    10.4 5K LLLMON.ASM SEE LLLBASIC.DOC
    10.5 1K TEST.FIL TEST PROGRAM. TO RUN TYPE
    "LLLBASIC TEST.FIL" AND AFTER
    "READY" PROMPT, TYPE "PTAPE"
    THEN YOU MAY "LIST" OR "RUN"


    LLFP.ASM begins:


    ;###S
    ;MODIFIED BY TONY GOLD FOR NON-MACR0 ASSEMBLER
    ;CHANGES WITHIN ;###S AND ;###E LINES
    ;ALL ORIGINAL CODE RETAINED AS COMMENTS
    ;###E
    ;
    ; ////FLOATING POINT PACKAGE FOR THE MCS8
    ; ////BY DAVID MEAD
    ; ////MODIFIED BY HAL BRAND 9/6/74
    ; ////MODIFIED FOR 24 BIT MANTISSAS***********
    ; ////PLUS ADDED I/O CONVERSION ROUTINES
    ; ////NEW ROUTINE COMMENTS
    ; ////ARE PRECEEDED BY /
    ; ////OTHER CHANGES ARE NOTED BY **
    ; ////MODIFIED BY FRANK OLKEN 6/28/75
    ;
    ;
    ;###S
    ; EQUATES FOR RELOCATED PACKAGES
    ORG 10DDH
    INTERP: EQU 0100H
    FPTBL: EQU 1774H
    IOJUMP: EQU 1900H
    CONIN: EQU IOJUMP+4
    STATUS: EQU IOJUMP+0AH
    INP: EQU FPTBL+33H
    OUTR: EQU FPTBL+36H
    OUTL: EQU INTERP+7D9H
    INL: EQU INTERP+996H
    ; ORG 110000Q
    ;
    ;
    CPM: EQU 5
    ;CONIN EQU 404Q ; JMP TABLE LOCATION OF CONSOLE INP.
    ;STATUS EQU 412Q ; JMP TABLE LOC. FOR STATUS PORT INPUT
    ;OUTR EQU 113775Q ;LINK TO BASIC
    ;OUTL EQU 103726Q

    Does this look like anything you've already seen?

    Bill

  6. Re: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package Pseudo-PRN File

    Hello, "Bill"!

    > = NOTE THAT IMPROVED IMPLEMENTATIONS OF LLLBASIC AND DISK
    > = TINY BASIC NOW ARE PRESENT ON VOLUMES 10 AND 11 RESPECTIVELY


    Many thanks for your message.

    Indeed, I was surprised that, if LLLBASIC had been so interesting, no improved
    or updated versions would have found their ways into the software library of
    the CP/M User's Group.

    This said, I was not expecting to recreate the source code of the LLLBASIC
    interpreter.

    I have only a handfull of issues of "Interface Age". I have no idea what was
    published in computer magazines at the time. I hope that more knowledgeable
    persons will tell us what would be the most logical way to recreate LLLBASIC
    and its doc.

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"




  7. Re: LLNL Library

    I wonder when will this thread ends?

    Last night, in my bed, I was wondering if I had been clear and well explained
    what I wanted to say (in a foreign language).

    I re-looked (in my head) the format of the LLLFPP, and suddenly said: "Bloody
    Hell! It was an ANSI 4-bytes FP format, while all my talks where mentioning
    the IEEE-754 (which is called "IEEE format")".

    So, for Newbies who started after the IBM Clown, I must explain that, before
    the IBM Clown, several Floating-Point implementations existed under CP/M.

    The most common one was the ANSI FP format, since it was a national (=US)
    standard.

    Under CP/M, the "Commercial BASIC" used a BCD Floating-Point system.

    There were also a few S-100 Bus cards which were using FP chips that were
    made, back then. The one I remember (there were several FP chips before the
    8087) is the AMD-9512.

    Of course, since everybody was re-inventing the wheel, back then, many persons
    created their own versions of FP.

    That's why it was a mess (but, at least, everybody had a more-or-less
    extensive comprehension of the difficulties of FP, since everybody had to
    implement one FP package, since the 8080 had no FP capabilities) until the
    8087 arrived, a long time after the IBM Clown.

    But the presence of the 8087 (etc.) created a new problem: since everybody was
    expecting that everybody had it, the subject became less and less understood,
    by lack of making your own.

    So, to close the loop: the LLLFPODT.ASM file that I recreated is the source
    code of a Floating-Point Package that used to run under the ODT (Octal
    Debugging Tool) used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory circa 1973-1975, and
    is, of course, a 8080 (and probably 8008, at the beginning) implementation of
    the ANSI 4-bytes FP standard, which is totally different from the IEEE-754 FP
    standard, which became the "standard" only after the IBM Clown.

    Hope to have been clear. As far as I know, no implementation of IEEE-754
    exists under CP/M, since it became a standard only after the shift to the IBM
    Clown. Maybe a programming project?

    Good luck.

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"




  8. Re: LLNL Library

    French Luser wrote:
    >
    > [snip...] [snip...] [snip...]
    >
    > Hope to have been clear. As far as I know, no implementation of IEEE-754
    > exists under CP/M, since it became a standard only after the shift to the IBM
    > Clown. Maybe a programming project?
    >

    Yes, ISTM that the IEEE-754 standard first came out in 1985, long
    after the appearance of the IBM PC. In the following web page:


    http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/754/


    ....you will find...

    IEEE 754-1985 governs binary floating-point arithmetic.
    It specifies number formats, basic operations, conversions,
    and exceptional conditions. The related standard
    IEEE 854-1987 generalizes 754 to cover decimal arithmetic
    as well as binary.


    --
    +----------------------------------------------------------------+
    | Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
    +----------------------------------------------------------------+

  9. Re: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Floating-Point Package Pseudo-PRN File

    Bill wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 11:53:56 -0500, Charles Richmond
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Hey Luser, what part of my previous post did you
    > >*not* understand??? I found a .ARK file online
    > >that *contains* the LLL Floating Point source code.
    > >
    > >Here is the information again:
    > >
    > >
    > >VOLUME 2 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC AND DISK TINY BASIC
    > >
    > >2.1 84K LLLBASIC.ASM LLLBASIC INTERPRETER SOURCE

    >
    > When I got MY copy of the CPMUG002 disk, sometime around maybe 1980,
    > it contained a Catalog.2 that reads like THIS:
    >
    > = VOLUME 2
    > =
    > = LAWRENCE LIVERMORE BASIC AND DISK TINY BASIC
    > =
    > = NOTE THAT IMPROVED IMPLEMENTATIONS OF LLLBASIC AND DISK
    > = TINY BASIC NOW ARE PRESENT ON VOLUMES 10 AND 11 RESPECTIVELY
    > =
    > = NUMBER SIZE NAME COMMENTS
    > =
    > = CATALOG.2 CONTENTS OF CP/M VOLUME 2
    > = 2.1 84K LLLBASIC.ASM LLLBASIC INTERPRETER SOURCE
    >
    > I don't know where you got yours, or when, but I assure you mine (and
    > the above quoted portion) is directly traceable to CPMUG, about 25
    > years ago or so. Copy from librarian George Coyne, the CP/M Users
    > Group of Minnesota club copy.
    >
    > Maybe Richmond simply overlooked it, or left it out?
    >

    You might say that I overlooked it. The description in the CPMUG
    index did *not* sound like CPMUG010 represented an update to disk
    CPMUG002. That is why I did *not* mention disk 10.
    >
    > Those interested in this thread may find it instructive to check for
    > differences.
    >
    > Because I have ORIGINAL copies, nothing later redacted has been
    > removed. I will give copies to anyone of any redacted material solely
    > for educational use. You may not USE any such copies to actually
    > operate your computer. I am interested in preserving an accurate
    > history.
    >

    I am sure that LLLBASIC is public domain, and I believe that the
    floating point code is also public domain. So there should be *no*
    intellectual property problems with running this code. However,
    I do *not* blame you for being cautious here.

    --
    +----------------------------------------------------------------+
    | Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
    +----------------------------------------------------------------+

  10. Re: LLNL Library

    Wahoo!

    > http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/754/


    Very good Web page, Charles!

    You can rest, at last!

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"




  11. Re: LLNL Library

    Short story: the document linked below

    http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/lllfp_update.txt

    either has, or links to, ASM files and documents regarding the LLNL
    "floating point" package discussed in this thread. Look there for
    specifics and the various files. I'll update it if others report more
    Lawrence Livermore Lab "stuff", as my time permits. I'd like notice
    from any Web site that chooses to archive the files listed and offered
    as I don't plan to maintain an archive myself: I'll add links to such
    archives when notified.

    Details below. - Herb Johnson

    Herb Johnson wrote:

    > All this got my attention. At this point, there are two accessable
    > versions of
    > the Lawrence Livermore Labs floating point package:
    >
    > http://www.retroarchive.org/cpm/cdro...G/CPMUG002.ARK
    >
    > I'll call this the "CPMUG file".
    >
    > PDF of LLNL document listing and describing that file at:
    >
    > http://www.llnl.gov/tid/lof/documents/pdf/171286.pdf
    >
    > as UCRL-51940, Floating Point Package for 8008 and 8080...
    > Michael D Maples Oct 24 1975.
    >
    > I'll call this "LLNL listing".


    Thanks to "Bill", in another part of this thread. He pointed out that
    there WAS an update in CPMUG Volume 10. So that would be a "third"
    version generally available:

    http://www.retroarchive.org/cpm/cdro...G/CPMUG010.ARK

    However, when I did a "quick" visual review (about half an hour)
    between the two
    sets of floating-poing codes, there were only some changes to tables at
    either end of the ASM file. THE CODE LOOKS IDENTICAL otherwise. NEITHER
    has the square-root routine as listed in the PDF of the LLNL document
    as linked above.

    http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/lllfp_update.txt

    So my "update" file now includes the differences between the CPMUG02
    and CPMUG010 files. It has the square root routine from the PDF
    listing. It links to the files as also linked above, plus to copies on
    my Web site of
    Roche's hand-entered docs from the LLNL PDF document. I've also linked
    to
    my copies of the ASM files extracted from the CPMUG archives.

    My "update" file also has notes about the general discussion in this NG
    about the FP package. It does NOT discuss the methods of recovering
    files from printed sources or of file omparisons in CP/M: Mr. Roche's
    posts already do that. If and when Roche releases his ASM copy, I'll
    add that to my site and to this document. I'll update the "update"
    document if
    anyone reports other sources or files.

    If this bit of work becomes of more interest I'll revise my document to
    an HTML file. All the ASM files are available to anyone. All the code
    is a product of a US National Lab and I know of no copyright issues
    associated with such work.When the dust settles on all
    this, I'll post BRIEF and final results.

    I'd like notice from any Web site that chooses to archive the files
    listed and offered as I don't plan to maintain an archive myself: I'll
    add links to such archives when notified.

    Herb Johnson

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    web site
    domain mirror
    my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
    "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
    S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"


  12. Re: LLNL Library

    Herb Johnson wrote on Oct 2nd:

    > Short story: the document linked below
    >
    > http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/lllfp_update.txt
    >
    > either has, or links to, ASM files and documents regarding the LLNL
    > "floating point" package discussed in this thread. Look there for
    > specifics and the various files. I'll update it if others report more
    > Lawrence Livermore Lab "stuff", as my time permits. I'd like notice
    > from any Web site that chooses to archive the files listed and offered
    > as I don't plan to maintain an archive myself: I'll add links to such
    > archives when notified.
    >
    > Details below. - Herb Johnson


    The above link is now obsolete.

    I've now completed recovering the LLNL "floating point" package from
    both the
    CPMUG archives (disks 2 and 10); the PDF from Lawrence Livermore; and
    from Roche's post of the document (but not source code) from the PDF.
    I've added those files to my Web section of several recovered files
    from Roche's posts:

    http://www.retrotechnology.com/roche/

    The Web page linked above links to my TEMPORARY archive of those files
    or links to other archives. Please notify me of any errors or
    corrections.

    Please notify me if you have a publically accessable archive of similar
    files and you've added these to YOUR archive; I'll post a link on my
    page to your archive accordingly. I'll remove these files when a few
    archives have taken them. My intent is TO REDISTRIBUTE, NOT TO ARCHIVE,
    this material.

    My email address is below. DO NOT EMAIL to "gmail.com".

    Herb Johnson

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    web site
    domain mirror
    my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
    "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
    S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"


  13. Re: LLNL Library

    On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 13:43:59 -0700, Grant Stockly wrote:

    > While searching for ANY information (I want the ROM Monitor code!!!)
    > for my MST-80 processor trainer kit from LLNL I found what you're
    > looking for.


    > And if someone would like to help me, I'm looking for any information
    > on the MST-80 single board microprocessor trainer kit.


    Grant,

    I have a photocopy of the manual for the MST-80. It has a listing of
    the monitor code, schematic, etc.

    If you email to me your mailing address I will send a copy to you.

    Cheers,

    Scott
    scotttt@optonline.net

  14. Re: LLNL Library


    Grant Stockly wrote:
    > While searching for ANY information (I want the ROM Monitor code!!!)
    > for my MST-80 processor trainer kit from LLNL I found what you're
    > looking for.
    >
    > Its a 46 page book available from Lawrence Livermore National
    > Laboratory.
    >
    > Try this link:
    >
    > http://www.llnl.gov/tid/lof/documents/pdf/171286.pdf
    >
    > If it doesn't work, let me know and I can describe how to search
    > through their site to get to it.
    >
    > And if someone would like to help me, I'm looking for any information
    > on the MST-80 single board microprocessor trainer kit.
    >


    Hello Grant,

    I just spent the better part of an hour trying to find that same
    document using the LLNL WWW site and failed. I would appreciate it if
    you could explain how you did it. I am looking for information on the
    use of CP/M in 1975 and later.

    Thanks, Jeff

  15. Re: LLNL Library

    > Hello Grant,
    >
    > I just spent the better part of an hour trying to find that same
    > document using the LLNL WWW site and failed. I would appreciate it if
    > you could explain how you did it. I am looking for information on the
    > use of CP/M in 1975 and later.
    >
    > Thanks, Jeff


    The website doesn't seem to be responding right now.

    I just did searches for 8080, 8008, MST80, MST-80.

    I'll try to find out later when it works.

    Grant


  16. Re: LLNL Library

    On 14 Jan 2007 23:06:44 -0800, "Grant Stockly"
    wrote:

    >> Hello Grant,
    >>
    >> I just spent the better part of an hour trying to find that same
    >> document using the LLNL WWW site and failed. I would appreciate it if
    >> you could explain how you did it. I am looking for information on the
    >> use of CP/M in 1975 and later.
    >>
    >> Thanks, Jeff

    >
    >The website doesn't seem to be responding right now.
    >
    >I just did searches for 8080, 8008, MST80, MST-80.
    >
    >I'll try to find out later when it works.
    >
    >Grant


    It looks like someone noticed the access and purged the files from
    their servers. I get nothing from the url till I cut it back to the
    tid entry. Everything past that is gone.

  17. Re: LLNL Library

    Grant Stockly wrote:

    >>Hello Grant,
    >>
    >>I just spent the better part of an hour trying to find that same
    >>document using the LLNL WWW site and failed. I would appreciate it if
    >>you could explain how you did it. I am looking for information on the
    >>use of CP/M in 1975 and later.
    >>
    >>Thanks, Jeff

    >
    >
    > The website doesn't seem to be responding right now.
    >
    > I just did searches for 8080, 8008, MST80, MST-80.
    >
    > I'll try to find out later when it works.
    >
    > Grant
    >


    Hi Grant,

    I called them up and asked why the search link didn't work. The reason
    is that the server quit working. They said it probably would be fixed
    but were not sure when. It probably was already not working when I tried
    to search.

    Jeff

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