RS-232 File system - CP/M

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  1. RS-232 File system

    Here's a question:

    Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    Anybody?

    mike

  2. Re: RS-232 File system

    MikeS wrote:
    >
    > Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    > system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    > track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data
    > (in)/ out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator"
    > server at the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd
    > imagine that in all these years pretty well every idea has been
    > tried by somebody, and there are certainly non-CP/M machines that
    > do something similar.


    I wrote one about 35 years ago. It handled the print, punch, and
    read(tape) devices. Line by line. At the time 2400 baud
    communication was much faster than 110 baud to a Teletype, and the
    eventual printers were also much faster.

    Quite adequate for running assemblers, editors, compilers on the
    micro.

    --
    Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)

    Try the download section.


    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  3. Re: RS-232 File system

    MikeS wrote:
    > Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    > system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    > track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    > out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    > the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    > all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    > there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.


    CP/Net is not the answer ?

    Regards
    Peter

    --
    * Try http://www.z80.eu for CP/M computer infos...

  4. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    wrote:

    >Here's a question:
    >
    >Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.


    None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    and even DEC did it.

    Speed is tied to serial line and seek time of the host. If the host
    has little or no delay it can be decent at 19200. Most of the oder
    systems that did this were slow as the storage was floppy
    and you had to wait for it to grind.

    Serial packet protocal simple and easy

    BIOS that gathers disk IO requests and passes them down the serial
    for action by the host.

    The bios is fairly simple.
    Gather unit, track,sector
    If write 128bytes of data, package and send with write
    request.
    If read send with read request and wait for return packet.
    IF error then go fix

    A host that has the same protocal and will fill to the request.
    Basically the mirror image and hardware/CPU wise not a lot
    needed other than storage to do this. An 8048 or AVR has the
    horse power to do this.


    Allison

    >Anybody?
    >
    >mike



  5. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 11:20:24 +0100, "Peter Dassow (remove the NOSPAM.
    for direct answer)" wrote:

    >MikeS wrote:
    >> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    >
    >CP/Net is not the answer ?


    CP/Net is not. CPnet is the higher level layer for networked OS.
    However the transport and all the NIOS stuff is implmentation
    dependent.

    You can do a serial connected file system under CP/M V2 easily
    and even a limited network without the few added features of CP/Net.

    The only real differnce been CP/M2 and CP/net is a few added
    API calls to login, and handle network traffic and provide functions
    that compliment Mp/M. None of those are needed to simple interface
    a disk analog over serial line.


    Allison

    >Regards
    > Peter



  6. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 13:19:54 GMT, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Here's a question:
    >>
    >>Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >>system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >>track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >>out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >>the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >>all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >>there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    >
    >None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    >Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    >and even DEC did it.
    >
    >Speed is tied to serial line and seek time of the host. If the host
    >has little or no delay it can be decent at 19200. Most of the oder
    >systems that did this were slow as the storage was floppy
    >and you had to wait for it to grind.
    >
    >Serial packet protocal simple and easy
    >
    >BIOS that gathers disk IO requests and passes them down the serial
    >for action by the host.
    >
    > The bios is fairly simple.
    > Gather unit, track,sector
    > If write 128bytes of data, package and send with write
    > request.
    > If read send with read request and wait for return packet.
    > IF error then go fix
    >
    >A host that has the same protocal and will fill to the request.
    >Basically the mirror image and hardware/CPU wise not a lot
    >needed other than storage to do this. An 8048 or AVR has the
    >horse power to do this.
    >

    Additional note:

    I did this over 25 years ago when I have three systems an
    not enough disk drives and controllers for all plus one had
    both 8" floppy and 5mb hard disk making it a good transfer
    system (8" standard) and enough space to store a lot.

    The software used a simple serial port to take to the guy that had it
    all and simply made requests. Later on it would grow to a "network"
    that could share printers, terminal IO, disks as if it were local to
    the requestor and used a two wire bidirectional 64kbit/sec serial
    link that had basic CSMA/CD. I still have a S100 crate that does
    a subset of this at the bus level with multiple CPUs.


    Allison

    >
    >Allison
    >
    >>Anybody?
    >>
    >>mike



  7. Re: RS-232 File system

    MikeS wrote:

    > Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    > system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    > track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    > out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    > the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    > all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    > there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.


    I believe there is a CP/M Kermit, which could supply to protocol.
    (That is, remote kermit in server mode.) Then you need the local
    system to make requests from the server instead of running a
    local kermit. Though copying to a local disk (maybe a solid state
    disk) wouldn't be too hard.

    How about NFS/UDP over SLIP? NFS does direct access (I believe it is
    byte addressed, not track/sector or block) though. It might be that
    kermit can do that, too. I haven't looked at the details for a while.
    It is useful to restart a transfer after a broken connection.

    There is also TFTP, which is a UDP based file transfer protocol.

    -- glen


  8. Re: RS-232 File system


    MikeS quoth:

    > Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    > system over an RS-232 port?


    Circa 1988, as a novice with C, I wrote some C code for an Osborne I
    that would use the RAM a second O1 as a ramdisk over the serial port.
    Code on the second O1 used all of RAM (including CPP and video RAM but
    excluding the BDOS, BIOS and base page) with stored data and retrieved
    it on request. Ad hoc protocol, ludicrously slow at 2400 bps, amusing
    to watch the screen of the storage machine fill with snow as data was
    stored. Totally useless but entertaining and a great learning
    project.

    --
    Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

  9. Re: RS-232 File system


    wrote in message
    news:tgf0k3ln9rj5tq332rd5s9afcjma73abr4@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 13:19:54 GMT, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net
    > wrote:




    > >Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    > >and even DEC did it.


    If I remember correctly, the TU58 used a serial connection. Do you recall
    the protocol details?



    > >Serial packet protocal simple and easy
    > >
    > >BIOS that gathers disk IO requests and passes them down the serial
    > >for action by the host.
    > >
    > > The bios is fairly simple.
    > > Gather unit, track,sector
    > > If write 128bytes of data, package and send with write
    > > request.
    > > If read send with read request and wait for return packet.
    > > IF error then go fix
    > >
    > >A host that has the same protocal and will fill to the request.
    > >Basically the mirror image and hardware/CPU wise not a lot
    > >needed other than storage to do this. An 8048 or AVR has the
    > >horse power to do this.


    I did something like that myself using a hacked up cp/net protocol. I have
    a
    process running under Linux which converts the track and sector values into
    a block
    number of a disk image and read/writes the data. I used this to get cp/m
    going on an
    old print sharer box (which has a Z180, 4 serial ports and 256K). Works
    well but a bit slow.

    I now have CP/NOS running on it back to the Linux box with direct access to
    Linux files.

    Just can't throw away usefull stuff like that.... :-)

    Max.



  10. Re: RS-232 File system

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions, even though a few of them missed
    the point somewhat. I'm not looking for a network or kermit kind of
    *file* transfer thing, but a *track & sector* protocol a la Atari or
    Commodore et al, effectively a remote FDC over RS-232 instead of
    S-100.

    I might have known that Allison's done it; what hasn't she done (and
    she talks about *Grant* having way too much time...;-).

    Now, what do I have to do to persuade those that did do this sort of
    thing to let me peek at their code (if it still exists)? Pretty
    please?

    Thanks, and TIA


  11. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 08:43:54 GMT, "Max Scane"
    wrote:

    >
    > wrote in message
    >news:tgf0k3ln9rj5tq332rd5s9afcjma73abr4@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 13:19:54 GMT, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net
    >> wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >> >Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    >> >and even DEC did it.

    >
    >If I remember correctly, the TU58 used a serial connection. Do you recall
    >the protocol details?


    It was serial and I have all the DEC docs on it. the protocal is
    interesting but more complex than needed.

    >
    >
    >> >Serial packet protocal simple and easy
    >> >
    >> >BIOS that gathers disk IO requests and passes them down the serial
    >> >for action by the host.
    >> >
    >> > The bios is fairly simple.
    >> > Gather unit, track,sector
    >> > If write 128bytes of data, package and send with write
    >> > request.
    >> > If read send with read request and wait for return packet.
    >> > IF error then go fix
    >> >
    >> >A host that has the same protocal and will fill to the request.
    >> >Basically the mirror image and hardware/CPU wise not a lot
    >> >needed other than storage to do this. An 8048 or AVR has the
    >> >horse power to do this.

    >
    >I did something like that myself using a hacked up cp/net protocol. I have
    >a process running under Linux which converts the track and sector values
    > into a block number of a disk image and read/writes the data. I used this
    >to get cp/m going on an old print sharer box (which has a Z180, 4 serial
    >ports and 256K). Works well but a bit slow.


    Use faster serial.

    Also If yo use 256sectors per track and some integer number of tracks
    (up to 256) that means the concatenated track (hi) and sector (lo)
    are a 16bit LBA if the OFFSET value (reserved tracks) is 000.
    That allows addressing up to 8MB of disk.

    >I now have CP/NOS running on it back to the Linux box with direct access to
    >Linux files.
    >
    >Just can't throw away usefull stuff like that.... :-)


    temped to rebuild that and fly it again. I did it back in 81
    when floppies and hard disks were scarce and the idea was
    unusual.


    Allison
    >
    >Max.
    >



  12. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 19:57:01 -0800, glen herrmannsfeldt
    wrote:

    >MikeS wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    >
    >I believe there is a CP/M Kermit, which could supply to protocol.
    >(That is, remote kermit in server mode.) Then you need the local
    >system to make requests from the server instead of running a
    >local kermit. Though copying to a local disk (maybe a solid state
    >disk) wouldn't be too hard.


    It can but no need to make it complex either.

    >How about NFS/UDP over SLIP? NFS does direct access (I believe it is
    >byte addressed, not track/sector or block) though. It might be that
    >kermit can do that, too. I haven't looked at the details for a while.
    >It is useful to restart a transfer after a broken connection.


    Thats really making it complex.

    >There is also TFTP, which is a UDP based file transfer protocol.


    More stuff to do a simple task if the link is point to point serial.
    If you going to it on USB or Ethernet then why not MOP or LAD/RLAD
    or any one of several other non routable protocals.

    Allison

    >
    >-- glen



  13. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 06:25:45 GMT, Mike Spencer
    wrote:

    >
    >MikeS quoth:
    >
    >> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >> system over an RS-232 port?

    >
    >Circa 1988, as a novice with C, I wrote some C code for an Osborne I
    >that would use the RAM a second O1 as a ramdisk over the serial port.
    >Code on the second O1 used all of RAM (including CPP and video RAM but
    >excluding the BDOS, BIOS and base page) with stored data and retrieved
    >it on request. Ad hoc protocol, ludicrously slow at 2400 bps, amusing
    >to watch the screen of the storage machine fill with snow as data was
    >stored. Totally useless but entertaining and a great learning
    >project.


    the only problem is 2400baud. At 19200 and above it's very useful.

    One way of thinking of floppy is fast serial IO. (anywhere from
    15kbytes/sec to 62.5kbytes/sec) .

    Allison


  14. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:25:58 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    wrote:

    >Thanks everyone for the suggestions, even though a few of them missed
    >the point somewhat. I'm not looking for a network or kermit kind of
    >*file* transfer thing, but a *track & sector* protocol a la Atari or
    >Commodore et al, effectively a remote FDC over RS-232 instead of
    >S-100.
    >
    >I might have known that Allison's done it; what hasn't she done (and
    >she talks about *Grant* having way too much time...;-).
    >
    >Now, what do I have to do to persuade those that did do this sort of
    >thing to let me peek at their code (if it still exists)? Pretty
    >please?


    I sent you the basis ( a fast binary file transfer using 128byte
    packets) the rest is pretty trivial. What is not easy is digging out
    the old code. I have it on a CP/M hard sector disk that is definatly
    burried under current projects. I'm also missing a small chunk of
    code that goes with it. Hey I havent had that kind of excess time
    in 25 years. I could likely reconstruct it from memory it really was
    that simple.

    Allison




    >
    >Thanks, and TIA



  15. Re: RS-232 File system

    On 2007-11-19, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 08:43:54 GMT, "Max Scane"
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>If I remember correctly, the TU58 used a serial connection. Do you recall
    >>the protocol details?

    >
    > It was serial and I have all the DEC docs on it. the protocal is
    > interesting but more complex than needed.


    The docs can be found over at bitsavers in
    http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/dectape/
    --
    roger ivie
    rivie@ridgenet.net

  16. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 02:58:02 GMT, Roger Ivie
    wrote:

    >On 2007-11-19, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >> On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 08:43:54 GMT, "Max Scane"
    >> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>If I remember correctly, the TU58 used a serial connection. Do you recall
    >>>the protocol details?

    >>
    >> It was serial and I have all the DEC docs on it. the protocal is
    >> interesting but more complex than needed.

    >
    >The docs can be found over at bitsavers in
    >http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/dectape/



    Thank you very much. I knew they were out there. I also have some
    old internal product files but, those are less relevant. I have this
    as I have three working TU58 and spares to make two more
    and the oddball parallel interface TU58 that was used in the
    PDT11/130.


    Allison

  17. Re: RS-232 File system

    no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Here's a question:
    >>
    >> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    >
    > None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    > Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    > and even DEC did it.
    >

    The unix/Linux c source of an disk emulator is at:
    http://www.xs4all.nl/~fjkraan/comp/px4/vfloppy/ here are also links to
    the actual protocol description (originally for the HX-20. The PX- uses
    a small subset.

    Fred Jan

    P.S. The unix image read and write tools are buggy, the actual emulator
    is ok. Probably because I didn't wrote it :-)

  18. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 19:55:06 +0100, Fred Jan Kraan
    wrote:

    >no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >> On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Here's a question:
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >>> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >>> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >>> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >>> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >>> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >>> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.

    >>
    >> None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    >> Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    >> and even DEC did it.
    >>

    >The unix/Linux c source of an disk emulator is at:
    >http://www.xs4all.nl/~fjkraan/comp/px4/vfloppy/ here are also links to
    >the actual protocol description (originally for the HX-20. The PX- uses
    >a small subset.
    >
    >Fred Jan
    >
    >P.S. The unix image read and write tools are buggy, the actual emulator
    >is ok. Probably because I didn't wrote it :-)


    If you want to emulate either side of he PX-8 and the serial connected
    disk this is the place. It's very capable and does more than just
    put a disk at the end of a serial port and you pay a price of
    complexity and speed.

    Allison

  19. Re: RS-232 File system

    no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 19:55:06 +0100, Fred Jan Kraan
    > wrote:
    >
    >> no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Here's a question:
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >>>> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >>>> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >>>> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >>>> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >>>> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >>>> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.
    >>> None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    >>> Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    >>> and even DEC did it.
    >>>

    >> The unix/Linux c source of an disk emulator is at:
    >> http://www.xs4all.nl/~fjkraan/comp/px4/vfloppy/ here are also links to
    >> the actual protocol description (originally for the HX-20. The PX- uses
    >> a small subset.
    >>
    >> Fred Jan
    >>
    >> P.S. The unix image read and write tools are buggy, the actual emulator
    >> is ok. Probably because I didn't wrote it :-)

    >
    > If you want to emulate either side of he PX-8 and the serial connected
    > disk this is the place. It's very capable and does more than just
    > put a disk at the end of a serial port and you pay a price of
    > complexity and speed.
    >
    > Allison


    vfloppy is a neat idea, but I've seen simpler smaller implementations,
    for example in the c128's bootstrap code. zimmers.net has the BIOS
    archived, and the file you would want to look at is cxext, if I remember
    correctly. All you need to do is point it at the other AICA port, and
    disable the routines for the ACIA code within. You also could, with a
    little creativity, use the bit-banging variant. Point is, the code is
    there, and the protocol is simpler than vfloppy, the code is smaller,
    and it provides the same feature set.


  20. Re: RS-232 File system

    On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 16:51:18 -0500, "Andrew J. Kroll" wrote:

    >no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 19:55:06 +0100, Fred Jan Kraan
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >>>> On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:56:12 -0800 (PST), MikeS
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Here's a question:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does anyone know of a CP/M implementation that used a remote file
    >>>>> system over an RS-232 port? I.e. it would send more or less normal
    >>>>> track/sector or block number requests and the corresponding data (in)/
    >>>>> out through a serial port to be handled by a "disk emulator" server at
    >>>>> the other end. Granted, it'd be kind of slow, but I'd imagine that in
    >>>>> all these years pretty well every idea has been tried by somebody, and
    >>>>> there are certainly non-CP/M machines that do something similar.
    >>>> None published but I did one. You need to do a few things..
    >>>> Actually the Epson PX-8 does this to external disk, Commies do it,
    >>>> and even DEC did it.
    >>>>
    >>> The unix/Linux c source of an disk emulator is at:
    >>> http://www.xs4all.nl/~fjkraan/comp/px4/vfloppy/ here are also links to
    >>> the actual protocol description (originally for the HX-20. The PX- uses
    >>> a small subset.
    >>>
    >>> Fred Jan
    >>>
    >>> P.S. The unix image read and write tools are buggy, the actual emulator
    >>> is ok. Probably because I didn't wrote it :-)

    >>
    >> If you want to emulate either side of he PX-8 and the serial connected
    >> disk this is the place. It's very capable and does more than just
    >> put a disk at the end of a serial port and you pay a price of
    >> complexity and speed.
    >>
    >> Allison

    >
    >vfloppy is a neat idea, but I've seen simpler smaller implementations,
    >for example in the c128's bootstrap code. zimmers.net has the BIOS


    While I agree Vfloppy is top heavy I'm not looking for example code.
    I have a version burried here that does work for me. If I find it
    however I'll not post it as was, it's 25 years old and absolutley zero
    comments. the first version was wirtten on NS* MDS with single
    density controller under V1.4 for a V2.2 target not yet running.
    Those tiny disks (~80k free) meant comments were
    for later. The problem was later happens in the form of hard
    disk and softsector DSDD and well I never documented it
    other than from memory.

    >archived, and the file you would want to look at is cxext, if I remember
    >correctly. All you need to do is point it at the other AICA port, and
    >disable the routines for the ACIA code within. You also could, with a
    >little creativity, use the bit-banging variant. Point is, the code is
    >there, and the protocol is simpler than vfloppy, the code is smaller,
    >and it provides the same feature set.


    The first port used 8251s and a MITS 2sio I had. The diskless was my
    Netronics Explorer 8085 and the disk rich system was NS* MDS with
    three SA400s. I still have and use both.

    Allison

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