CP/M Archive - CP/M

This is a discussion on CP/M Archive - CP/M ; Axel Berger wrote: >I don't quite agree. If and as long as you can't have what's best, >second or third best is to be aimed for. Posting to obscure usenet >groups without commitment to mainenance is no easier than just ...

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Thread: CP/M Archive

  1. Re: CP/M Archive




    Axel Berger wrote:

    >I don't quite agree. If and as long as you can't have what's best,
    >second or third best is to be aimed for. Posting to obscure usenet
    >groups without commitment to mainenance is no easier than just sticking
    >into a domain. But the latter makes is far easier for others to browse
    >and mirror what's there.
    >In the end ease and diversity may well be what counts.


    Post a list of titles, dates, and message IDs for those "posts to
    obscure usenet groups" and the information will appear on a website
    in short order.


  2. Re: CP/M Archive

    I got the major part of the manuals from Uwe Nass, so now the list of
    missing files is reduced to:

    > DRI C Programmer's guide for CP/M-86 Second Edition : 36.5M
    > (dric86.zip)


    Thanks!
    Gaby

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


  3. Re: CP/M Archive

    On the subject of mirroring, and directed to those who have content
    online;

    What do you think of the idea of offering backup CD's/DVD's of your
    site's content for a nominal fee? This could turn into a annual
    offering, or some such. The idea of such a backup puts all of the
    content in an organized way into the hands of many in a durable and
    convenient form.

    Well, more could be said, but I open it up for discussion.

    Gaby Chaudry wrote:
    > I got the major part of the manuals from Uwe Nass, so now the list of
    > missing files is reduced to:
    >
    > > DRI C Programmer's guide for CP/M-86 Second Edition : 36.5M
    > > (dric86.zip)

    >


    Please grab it from ftp://project001.serveftp.net/DISK 1/DRC86.pdf if
    you can.

    I see a size of 37.2 mb, but I believe it's what you are looking for.
    Second Edition.

    Steve

    > Thanks!
    > Gaby
    >
    > --
    > Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    > http://www.gaby.de
    > mailto: gaby@gaby.de



  4. Re: CP/M Archive

    >On the subject of mirroring, and directed to those who have content
    >online;


    >What do you think of the idea of offering backup CD's/DVD's of your
    >site's content for a nominal fee? This could turn into a annual
    >offering, or some such. The idea of such a backup puts all of the
    >content in an organized way into the hands of many in a durable and
    >convenient form.


    >Well, more could be said, but I open it up for discussion.


    I think it's a good idea, however there are a couple of issues.

    It can be a lot of work, especially if your site is popular. One of the
    main reasons I created my site is so tthat others can have access
    to the material I have preserved without my having to be constantly
    providing a "manual service". Even then - maintaining the site is a
    lot of work at times, however at least it's only "done once" and
    does help distribute/protect the material.

    Burning and shipping DVDs could get tedious - perhaps you could
    do one run a year, however even so - given the time and expense
    involved, it would seem reasonable to charge something for your
    time, media, packing material and shipping expenses. I don't know
    what would be a reasonable rate, however it it takes a day to burn,
    package and ship 10-20 DVDs, then a fee of $20-$40 each would
    seem reasonable to me. (I doubt there would be enough interest to
    warrent a full production run).

    But this causes people to assume you are making "big money"
    which leads to problems:

    Many people in this arena have material on their sites which although
    obsolete, unobtainable elsewhere and having no current commercial
    value is still technically protected by copyright. Often the copyright
    holder grants formal permission to use it, or agrees to "look the other
    way" because they know there is no revenue to be generated by it,
    and don't mind it being made available to a very small group of
    hobbiests - but often these informal agreements are accompanied
    by statements such as "for free distribution" or "not for profit". Having
    the appearance that you are "making money" from this material can
    lead to difficulty in obtaining permissions and other misunderstandings.

    Many (most) people won't pay for "free content", if it's up on your site
    for free (*1), then it is automatically assumed that any time you send on
    it should also be free. I agree with this to a certain point - I don't mind
    answering email questions taking the odd photo, looking up bits of
    documentation on a one-of basis, however if I were going to invest
    several days (or more) in taking orders, preparing the master, burning
    the DVDs, packing them, shipping them and dealing with all the related
    questions and other paperwork, I would want to at least recover my
    time and expenses.

    (*1 - or even if it's not - look at the flak Herb has taken because he
    charges a few cents/page to copy, pack and ship you a manual or
    diskette that you often can't get elsewhere).

    On a related subject, a pet-peeve of mine:

    Until very recently, I've had to access the internet through a dial-up
    connection, thus It was well worth it to me to purchase a $30 DVD
    from Ebay with a collection of manuals or other related material,
    because I simply COULD NOT download them...

    Yet I observed constant griping from owners of sites who material
    was being offered, noises about "legal action" against those people
    who were "making money from our work" and so forth.

    None of these people offered DVDs themselves, and they were happy
    to have me pay many $$$ to my ISP for the hundreds of hours required
    to download the small portion fo the material that I could, but they
    strongly objected to someone charging me $20 to deliver it to me on a
    DVD.

    I guess what it comes down to is, are you in this to preserve the material,
    or are you in it so that everyone will recognize what a great guy you are
    for all your selfless effort in making your web site - if the former, then WHY
    do you complain when more copies are distributed to more people
    through an Ebay entrepreneur. If the latter, then why not go the extra mile
    and make the DVDs available yourself.

    My own take on all this is that I don't have the available time to be offering
    a "free DVD service", and the hassles and misperceptions arising from a
    "small fee" are someplace I don't want to go - I encourage people to
    mirror the site and to maintain your own personal archives of the material.
    If someone not related to me wants to make DVDs of the site, that would
    be fine with me.

    --
    dave06a@ Collector of classic pre-PC computer systems.
    dunfield. If you have an old 8/16 bit non-PC system in need of a good
    com home, please contact me at email address on the left, or
    via contact link of this web site:
    http://www.classiccmp.org/dunfield/index.html


  5. Re: CP/M Archive

    Dave,

    first of all I must say that I agree with you about the possible
    problems arising from a fee for a CD/DVD copy - which is absolutely
    necessary even when you just count the price for the CD/DVD and
    shipping (apart from the work) - and the problem that many people are
    not even willing to pay a small fee for something they can get for free
    on the web.

    There is another problem:
    Only yesterday I made a full backup of my site. It contains more than
    20'000 files, some of which are pages not maintained by me (I donated a
    bit of webspace to friends), others are not meant for the public
    (scripts, hidden files, private data etc.).
    Just extracting the files that are for everybody, is nearly impossible.

    It's much easier if somebody else copies the site with wget or a
    similar tool and makes a mirror and/or private copy.

    Btw, some people pointed me to archive.org if I'm looking for lost
    files. Unfortunately, in most cases archive.org preserves the html
    pages only, but no files. So if e.g. you go to one of the archive.org
    copies of Randy's site and click on a pdf file, you will get a "not in
    archive" error message. So it's nothing to rely on, it's just for
    checking what was there if you want to synchronize data.

    Bye, Gaby

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


  6. Re: CP/M Archive

    Everything snipped to save reading....

    I would suggest the following to anyone with a site.

    Make a CDrom or DVD or two and keep it as backup. It's also advised
    to "distribute" a few copies to people that could continue the work or
    reestablish it if a disaster occured. Tim Olmstead did this so Gaby
    ( myself or others) could continue his work. It helps if family are
    involved in the preservation work as well.

    As to selling compilations of work. That is something with all the
    copyright issues that abound should be paid work. Over the years
    I have purchased several of the Walnut Creek CDs and their cost
    was small and value over time imense.

    For those that bark that information should be free, no problem.
    Running servers, maintaining a domain name, updating files,
    and all cost time and real money, so that free "web content" is
    not cost free for someone. You still have to pay for the copier
    (paper, RDr, DVD, DSL, cable) or whatever the distibution media
    with some profit for those that provide the service. For those that
    feel thats unreasonable, here's a #2 pencil and a pad go play
    scribe (monk). Then tell me how much your time is worth!

    Also I recognize that DSL/Cable/Wifi are not as yet universally
    available. To that I'll point out that people less than 20mi from
    Boston (maybe you heard of the berg) I have friends that cannot
    get high speed access as yet. That last mile can be a lockout
    for some. For some it's still costly to get that fast access. So
    its not an exclusive issue of rural areas or some countries.


    Allison



  7. Re: CP/M Archive

    Some replies to questions/comments in the thread:

    s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:

    > What do you think of the idea of offering backup CD's/DVD's of your
    > site's content for a nominal fee? This could turn into a annual
    > offering, or some such. The idea of such a backup puts all of the
    > content in an organized way into the hands of many in a durable and
    > convenient form.


    Dave.Dunfield said:

    > Burning and shipping DVDs could get tedious - perhaps you
    > could do one run a year, however even so - given the time
    > and expense involved, it would seem reasonable to charge
    > something for your time, media, packing material and
    > shipping expenses....But this causes people to assume
    > you are making "big money" which leads to problems...


    Dave's other comments are well worth reading, especially for those
    considering starting an archive.

    I've made a business of providing CP/M and related "content", including
    providing copies of the Walnut Creek CP/M CD-ROM; so I have a clue
    about this idea of selling CD's or DVD's. Over the three years or so in
    which I offered that CD-ROM for $10 flat by check/money order, all
    costs included, I only sold perhaps six or seven. I'm sure if I charged
    $5 instead, the result would be the same. As there are a few on-line
    archives of that CD, I've removed this service from my Web site. People
    WILL pay for content not otherwise available for free, however, that is
    also my experience.

    "Free" CD and DVD "distribution" has also been suggested as a means of
    preserving and backing up content. For a few dollars each, I could well
    have sent copies to several people, if that were my goal. Indeed, I've
    recieved such CD's of content for just that purpose. It's a reasonable
    idea and not new. But it's not a way to raise funds to keep a site
    going, or to pay for one's time as has been discussed. Otherwise I do
    backups, a prudent course of action for everyone.

    The only "problems" I've had with this kind of work, is when some guy
    decides I'm evil for what I do, and then bugs me about it. Since
    statements like this often bring them out in the open, I'll just save
    some time and offer my stock prepared statement:

    http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs.../offtopic.html

    One side issue about "annual offerings" of DVDs. Almost all the content
    in the CP/M world is STATIC. No change, little development (with
    exceptions). The only change is when someone releases onto a Web site,
    material heretofore not on a Web site, for free. Otherwise it's either
    scanned-for-fee CD's, or offline content for a fee.

    The exceptions to the above is work like Dave Dunfield's accumulating
    archive of boot disk images; or code from new projects relevant to CP/M
    like the P112 project. Or, when one creates new CP/M content: I do a
    bit of that, or aggregate it when others do it.

    I suppose the "annual" concept is that an active CP/M archivist is
    scouring the Web, looking for these events, grabbing the content and
    archiving it onto their pages; and then once a year offering the
    "harvest" on a DVD.

    Think this through. That calls for a lot of work on a regular basis, as
    otherwise it would take years for some archive to achieve sufficient
    status that third parties who release such content would as a matter of
    course contact the archive site. We're lucky that comp.os.cpm (among
    other newsgroups) gets notice of such events, first or second-hand,
    because of its longevity of purpose. I benefit from such notices, and
    do my own scouring, as I update my Web site and list of S-100 (and more
    often CP/M-oid) Web pointers:

    http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/s_point.html

    Another comment. One response to my cautions and considerations about
    archiving was called by one "the best as the enemy of the good". I call
    it knowing what the job is, or the business plan is, before you invest
    your time and money and your good name. And, before people come to
    depend on your efforts. In my time, "job", "business", and
    "dependability" used to be good things and not bad words.

    Herb Johnson

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    web site
    domain mirror
    my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
    "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
    S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"


  8. Re: CP/M Archive

    Thanks, Steve, meanwhile I got this file from Uwe Nass.

    > > > DRI C Programmer's guide for CP/M-86 Second Edition : 36.5M
    > > > (dric86.zip)


    I'm now looking for a host for a total of 172M....

    Bye, Gaby

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


  9. Re: CP/M Archive


    Dave Dunfield wrote:
    > >On the subject of mirroring, and directed to those who have content
    > >online;

    >


    I've snipped alot, but your points are well taken, thanks for the
    feedback.

    > >What do you think of the idea of offering backup CD's/DVD's of your
    > >site's content for a nominal fee? This could turn into a annual
    > >offering, or some such. The idea of such a backup puts all of the
    > >content in an organized way into the hands of many in a durable and
    > >convenient form.

    >
    > >Well, more could be said, but I open it up for discussion.

    >
    > I think it's a good idea, however there are a couple of issues.
    >
    > It can be a lot of work, especially if your site is popular. One of the
    > main reasons I created my site is so tthat others can have access
    > to the material I have preserved without my having to be constantly
    > providing a "manual service". Even then - maintaining the site is a
    > lot of work at times, however at least it's only "done once" and
    > does help distribute/protect the material.
    >

    I was supposing folks are backing up their site content to CD/DVD, so
    I figured making some number of redundant copies for others,
    not_for_free,
    would be time efficient. I glossed over copyright issues however, and
    the
    social issues that you and Herb bring fourth.

    > (*1 - or even if it's not - look at the flak Herb has taken because he
    > charges a few cents/page to copy, pack and ship you a manual or
    > diskette that you often can't get elsewhere).
    >

    Ahem, that's what I mean by 'social issues'. :-/

    > On a related subject, a pet-peeve of mine:
    >
    > Until very recently, I've had to access the internet through a dial-up
    > connection, thus It was well worth it to me to purchase a $30 DVD
    > from Ebay with a collection of manuals or other related material,
    > because I simply COULD NOT download them...
    >


    As Allison notes, there are gaping holes, yet, in the broadband net.
    Also
    disconcerting is the recent trend of broadband providers going to a
    multi-tier bandwidth provisional based on how much the user is willing
    to
    pay for [In the US market]. From what I gather, the 'economical' tiers
    are
    not 'large download friendly' either.

    When Gene Buckle offered his 'CP/M Archive' CD, I was also on dial-up.
    While the direct costs of such a download, in my case, would not have
    been
    much [a local flat-rate call], my ISP had a 4 hour connect limit that
    was
    onerous for even overnight large file downloads. I appreciated his CD
    offering,
    and that was in the back of my mind when I opened this discussion.

    >
    > My own take on all this is that I don't have the available time to be offering
    > a "free DVD service", and the hassles and misperceptions arising from a
    > "small fee" are someplace I don't want to go - I encourage people to
    > mirror the site and to maintain your own personal archives of the material.
    > If someone not related to me wants to make DVDs of the site, that would
    > be fine with me.
    >

    Along with the rest of the comments in this thread, the only ad hoc
    solution
    seems to be for individuals to mirror sites to their private backups.
    This doesn't
    bode well, for long term survival of this content, nor its future
    distribution from
    the hands of a few at best.

    Steve


  10. Re: CP/M Archive

    s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:

    > Along with the rest of the comments in this thread, the only ad hoc
    > solution
    > seems to be for individuals to mirror sites to their private backups.
    > This doesn't
    > bode well, for long term survival of this content, nor its future
    > distribution from
    > the hands of a few at best.
    >
    > Steve


    Steve, thanks for your discussion and comments. But I did not mean to
    create any pessimism about the future of CP/M archives. My part in this
    thread was to suggest that anyone who wants to create AND MAINTAIN an
    archive needs to be thoughtful about that commitment, just as I have
    been about my Web-based S-100 stuff and content. That is simply my
    bias.

    I believe all the issues mentioned in this thread can be overcome.

    I think the issues of broadband access and of money can be overcome, by
    anyone who simply shows some commitment and determination, and who also
    asks for a little help from others. Persons (in the US) without
    broadband access at home, can often find it locally when needed. A
    budget of $100 a year - adequate for a domain name and some Web storage
    - could be met simply from people who are greatful for efforts and
    result, and who get asked for support or who give it freely. Indeed,
    there is already an offer of a domain name AND a gigabyte of storage -
    freely offered!

    I don't discuss copyright as a matter of public practice; I'm not a
    lawyer and don't give legal advice in public posts. But it's fair to
    say it has not emerged as a major issue. I mentioned there is the
    occasional jerk, that's hardly reason to be discouraged.

    As for "in the hands of a few": I think there are several active CP/M
    persons, each with Web sites, who contribute to the dicussion and to
    content (or at least making old content available). Check my DRI Web
    page for links to those and many other sites which work the CP/M
    "turf".

    People are still talking about CP/M, using CP/M, asking about CP/M -
    that's THIRTY YEARS from the first sales of it by DRI in 1976. Thirty
    years! that's over two (public) Internet lifetimes! I think that is
    astounding. Thirty years later, someone can resurrect a Z180 computer
    board (the P112) and STILL get people to buy it, and to install various
    alternatives to CP/M. Flavors of the 8080 processor, mostly Z80
    varients, are STILL being sold and STILL being used in embedded systems
    - Texas Instruments still sells a calculator with a Z80 based
    instruction set.

    And, there is still interest in the life of Gary Kildall, and about the
    controversies around the CP/M origins of MS-DOS - decades later. I'm
    learning about his early development history of CP/M, and adding that
    content to my site.

    The fact that the interest is small relative to the Windows or Linux
    world is not relevant. CP/M is from a time before ALL of that, when
    personal computing was "in the hands of a few". That's how technology
    works, and the history of technology is a subject which facinates many
    people today, professionally or personally. History is ALWAYS in the
    hands of a few, until it becomes commonplace, and after it becomes
    "obsolete". A few is enough, thanks to the Web, and to those active
    persons.

    Herb Johnson

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    web site
    domain mirror
    my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
    "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
    S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"


  11. Re: CP/M Archive


    Herb Johnson wrote:
    > s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    > > Along with the rest of the comments in this thread, the only ad hoc
    > > solution
    > > seems to be for individuals to mirror sites to their private backups.
    > > This doesn't
    > > bode well, for long term survival of this content, nor its future
    > > distribution from
    > > the hands of a few at best.
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    > Steve, thanks for your discussion and comments. But I did not mean to
    > create any pessimism about the future of CP/M archives. My part in this
    > thread was to suggest that anyone who wants to create AND MAINTAIN an
    > archive needs to be thoughtful about that commitment, just as I have
    > been about my Web-based S-100 stuff and content. That is simply my
    > bias.
    >

    I didn't take your comments to be pessimistic, just cautionary. And I
    don't mean
    for my comments above to be pessimistic, but likewise cautionary. As
    Gaby points out
    the issues she has with dividing backup content, and Dave's issues for
    why he leaves it to others, and encourages them to mirror, I just mean
    to give a cautionary summary: That Folks ought to grab the available
    content while they can. Future Folks who's interest is piqued by some
    CP/M reference will have to 'catch as catch can', the availability of
    content such as that may be then.

    The closest thing the CP/M community has to a offline librarian is the
    French Luser.

    I've lost content due to hard drive failure and file system corruption,
    thats why I prefer backup to CD's. I'll check on Gaby's suggestion
    regarding wget.

    > I believe all the issues mentioned in this thread can be overcome.
    >

    I agree.

    >


    > As for "in the hands of a few": I think there are several active CP/M
    > persons, each with Web sites, who contribute to the dicussion and to
    > content (or at least making old content available). Check my DRI Web
    > page for links to those and many other sites which work the CP/M
    > "turf".
    >

    My 'off the cuff' quip is: We are the hands of the few'! But actually,
    it is rather amazing how much material has actually come to light.
    Some of which I've been able to contribute. Of course, your service is
    a valuable asset to the community.

    > People are still talking about CP/M, using CP/M, asking about CP/M -
    > that's THIRTY YEARS from the first sales of it by DRI in 1976. Thirty
    > years! that's over two (public) Internet lifetimes! I think that is
    > astounding. Thirty years later, someone can resurrect a Z180 computer
    > board (the P112) and STILL get people to buy it, and to install various
    > alternatives to CP/M. Flavors of the 8080 processor, mostly Z80
    > varients, are STILL being sold and STILL being used in embedded systems
    > - Texas Instruments still sells a calculator with a Z80 based
    > instruction set.
    >
    > And, there is still interest in the life of Gary Kildall, and about the
    > controversies around the CP/M origins of MS-DOS - decades later. I'm
    > learning about his early development history of CP/M, and adding that
    > content to my site.
    >


    I'm right with you on the above. Thirty years later, but I think we
    are still too close to the event horizon to appreciate the historical
    significance of it.

    > The fact that the interest is small relative to the Windows or Linux
    > world is not relevant. CP/M is from a time before ALL of that, when
    > personal computing was "in the hands of a few". That's how technology
    > works, and the history of technology is a subject which facinates many
    > people today, professionally or personally. History is ALWAYS in the
    > hands of a few, until it becomes commonplace, and after it becomes
    > "obsolete". A few is enough, thanks to the Web, and to those active
    > persons.
    >

    Yet the caution is that that Web content can too easily perish in the
    Hard Drive failure, or some unforeseen watershed event.

    > Herb Johnson
    >

    Steve


  12. Re: CP/M Archive

    On 9 Aug 2006 15:16:33 -0700, s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:

    >
    >Herb Johnson wrote:
    >> s_dubrovich@yahoo.com wrote:
    >>

    snip---->
    >I've lost content due to hard drive failure and file system corruption,
    >thats why I prefer backup to CD's. I'll check on Gaby's suggestion
    >regarding wget.


    This has been one of my fears. However I've been maintaining an
    archive of CP/M on assorted floppies (8", 5.25 and 3.5) plus on
    several hard disks (on CP/M systems) and also a copy of everything
    on several PCs and a few spare drives on the shelf that have a
    backup copy of what I consider critical. Having killed seveal PCs
    and had more than a few disk crashes the multiple backup strategy
    has proven sound, though at times awkward. My PDP11s and VAXen
    also have copies on their drives though much of that was downloads
    of the cp/m archives on MARKET::.

    Looking back I've been preserving my work and software since
    before my first disk back in late '76 or so.


    Allison


  13. Re: CP/M Archive

    Dear all,

    > Yet the caution is that that Web content can too easily perish in the
    > Hard Drive failure, or some unforeseen watershed event.


    Fortunately, my ISP would run into REALLY BIG trouble if he should ever
    loose any content (he has got some quite unknown customers like Borland
    or Siemens), but my content would get lost immediately if for whatever
    reason I won't pay my bill...... These are the advantages and
    disadvantages of leaving the webhosting to a professional ISP instead
    of doing it at home (apart from the fact that I don't have the
    slightest idea about running a server of my own).
    So, my request for mirroring my pages is most of all based on the
    possibility that something unforseen could happen to me.
    Just to let you know if you are curious.
    For those that are even more curious: http://www.schlund.de/
    ("WebExpert")

    Regarding mirrors: I got several mails in the meantime from people
    willing to do some mirroring. It also included the request to give some
    more info on the required space for the mirrors, so here are some
    figures:

    - cpm.z80.de -> 120M
    - z80.info -> 40M
    - znode51.de -> 200M (*)
    - ftp.gaby.de (including Znode51 and Win 3.x stuff) -> 470M
    - gaby.de itself is approx. only about 20M, because it mainly points to
    the above mentioned domains.

    For those that are also interested in my M$ related stuff:
    - win31.de -> 7M
    - ftp.gaby.de/pub/win3x/ -> 236M
    - calmira.de -> 18M

    As for downloading the stuff: I heard that wget is a good tool, but
    I've got no personal experience with it. So you better ask somebody
    else.

    My forums can't be copied that way, because they are SQL server based.
    But I will try to find out if there's a possibility to backup the data
    via an SQL inquiry.

    Bye, Gaby

    (*) Fred, the 150M figure I gave you was wrong.

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de/
    mailto:gaby@gaby.de


  14. Re: CP/M Archive

    [former s100-manuals.com files]

    Me, myself and I wrote
    > I'm now looking for a host for a total of 172M....


    O.K. Tilmann offered me some webspace for it. As soon as it's online, I
    will update my links and publish the link here, so that others can
    mirror these files, too.

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


  15. Re: CP/M Archive

    >Along with the rest of the comments in this thread, the only ad hoc
    >solution seems to be for individuals to mirror sites to their private
    >backups. This doesn't bode well, for long term survival of this
    >content, nor its future distribution from the hands of a few at best.


    Just to be clear - mirroring to private backups was not the message
    I intended to convey when I stated that I encourage people to mirror
    my site - what I mean, is that I encourage people to mirror the site
    publically - so that multiple instances of the content will exist, I
    believe this is truly the best way to protect the material.

    I do also encourage private backups, and hope that those private
    backups would be made public if something catastrophic/permanent
    were to happen to the site - basically the more places it's stored, the
    better the changes that the material will survice.

    The purpose of my site is to protect and preserve the material
    contained therein - I don't have the resources to provide adaquate
    off-site protection and distribution of the material by other means,
    so I use the site as a way of sharing the material in the hopes that
    others will make their own backups of it.

    I don't claim ownership of the material, I don't even wish to claim
    or enforce ownership of the compilation - my site is not about me,
    it's about the material. It does not make money (in fact quite the
    opposite :-), and I don't expect to ever derive anything from it but
    the satisfaction of knowing I've done something to help preserve a
    very important part of our history which seems to be rapidly being
    forgotten in the craze for the latest and greatest technology of the
    week.

    It is my hope that if/when I might suddenly disappear, someone
    else till take the content and continue to build on it and make it
    available for others to experience and use. This material should
    outlive us all. Such a period of personal innovation and the ability
    of a few visionaries to shape the industry to such an extent that
    it was during the "early years" will probably never happen again,
    and they should not be forgotten, even in the face of the massive
    momentum of "modern" computing systems.

    Nuff said!

    Btw - I am also somewhat dismayed by a couple comments I've
    seen to the effect that site material would be lost of an "host had a
    failure" - I maintain a minimum of three fully up to date local copies
    of my site, any of which can be used to fully restore the on-line
    presence at any time.

    Regards,
    Dave

    --
    dave06a@ Collector of classic pre-PC computer systems.
    dunfield. If you have an old 8/16 bit non-PC system in need of a good
    com home, please contact me at email address on the left, or
    via contact link of this web site:
    http://www.classiccmp.org/dunfield/index.html


  16. Re: CP/M Archive

    > O.K. Tilmann offered me some webspace for it. As soon as it's online, I
    > will update my links and publish the link here, so that others can
    > mirror these files, too.


    The former gaby.s100-manuals.com files are now online at Tilmann's
    site. He will still have to change the directory listing restriction
    (there is no index file), but if you know the name of the file you can
    already access it at http://www.autometer.de/gaby/DRI/...

    Furthermore, Herb was so kind to collect FL's retyped manuals from
    c.o.c.(a), edit them and make them available for download. At this
    very moment I am adding them to the Unofficial CP/M Website.

    Btw, just for fun: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roche_limit ;-)

    Bye, Gaby

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


  17. Re: CP/M Archive

    Gaby Chaudry wrote:
    >
    >> O.K. Tilmann offered me some webspace for it. As soon as it's
    >> online, I will update my links and publish the link here, so
    >> that others can mirror these files, too.

    >
    > The former gaby.s100-manuals.com files are now online at
    > Tilmann's site. He will still have to change the directory
    > listing restriction (there is no index file), but if you know
    > the name of the file you can already access it at
    > http://www.autometer.de/gaby/DRI/...


    I have an automated system for creating index files with 4dos
    (running under W98), annotating the listings with the 4dos
    descriptions. The batch file is available on my site below,
    download section.

    --
    Chuck F (cbfalconer@yahoo.com) (cbfalconer@maineline.net)
    Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
    USE maineline address!



  18. Re: CP/M Archive

    Chuck,

    > I have an automated system for creating index files with 4dos
    > (running under W98), annotating the listings with the 4dos
    > descriptions. The batch file is available on my site below,
    > download section.


    Thanks a lot for the offer, but I don't want to bother Tilmann with
    that.

    Directory listing is now possible, so you can see the files anyway.

    Best wishes
    Gaby

    --
    Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
    http://www.gaby.de/
    mailto: gaby@gaby.de


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