Networking a new office! - Connectivity

This is a discussion on Networking a new office! - Connectivity ; Guys, I've been asked to Spec and Implement a new office installation that allows connectivity to it from remote locations. I'd just like some opinions on whether this setup would be endorsed by you guys as acceptable and also whether ...

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Thread: Networking a new office!

  1. Networking a new office!

    Guys,

    I've been asked to Spec and Implement a new office installation that allows
    connectivity to it from remote locations. I'd just like some opinions on
    whether this setup would be endorsed by you guys as acceptable and also
    whether it would be secure enough.

    I invisage using a Cisco or Draytek router with VPN capability straight into
    the router, therefore removing the need for software solutions, that crash
    (good 'ole Microsoft!).

    All users are using POP3 and not exchange so I see no reason to implement
    any such exchange server. Instead however they require shared file storage.
    We're massive fans of the Buffalo Terastation (a NAS Linux box), in 2 years
    it hasn't required a single reboot and is very stable, also Raid compliant
    from the factory with 4 discs inside it. I would map appropriate drives on
    each clients machine to the NAS server for access to shared documents.

    Finally, dialing in via the secure VPN would give you a local IP on the
    network, allowing access to the Terastation NAS device, and any
    printers/shared resources within the office from any location.

    Does this sound sufficiently secure/feasible providing the router itself is
    of good specification and incorporates some form of firewall?

    Appreciate your views/opinions/help!

    Cheers, @sh



  2. Re: Networking a new office!

    Hello Ash,

    As you know there are two forms of VPN, site-to-site and client-to-site.
    Having said
    this there are also multitudes of appliances out there which can solve your
    problem. Personally, I have used Netscreen, Cisco, Sonicwall, and a foreign
    appliance called I-Bekci. However; I have never worked on Draytek
    routers/firewall appliance.

    Going back to your question, I am assuming your refering to client-to-site
    vpn. If so I would suggest using a firewall appliance to service your vpn
    needs rather than a router. Furthermore look into netscreen or Sonicwall
    either one offer a solid three level encryption client-to-site vpn access.
    Setup and deployment are pretty straight forward. Additionally these
    appliances can be configured for DHCP and remote users those eliminating any
    radius, ldap or DHCP servers.

    I hope this helps.

    TK


    "Ash" wrote in message
    news:sL6dnQFUIY-ES9zbnZ2dnUVZ8qminZ2d@bt.com...
    > Guys,
    >
    > I've been asked to Spec and Implement a new office installation that
    > allows connectivity to it from remote locations. I'd just like some
    > opinions on whether this setup would be endorsed by you guys as acceptable
    > and also whether it would be secure enough.
    >
    > I invisage using a Cisco or Draytek router with VPN capability straight
    > into the router, therefore removing the need for software solutions, that
    > crash (good 'ole Microsoft!).
    >
    > All users are using POP3 and not exchange so I see no reason to implement
    > any such exchange server. Instead however they require shared file
    > storage. We're massive fans of the Buffalo Terastation (a NAS Linux box),
    > in 2 years it hasn't required a single reboot and is very stable, also
    > Raid compliant from the factory with 4 discs inside it. I would map
    > appropriate drives on each clients machine to the NAS server for access to
    > shared documents.
    >
    > Finally, dialing in via the secure VPN would give you a local IP on the
    > network, allowing access to the Terastation NAS device, and any
    > printers/shared resources within the office from any location.
    >
    > Does this sound sufficiently secure/feasible providing the router itself
    > is of good specification and incorporates some form of firewall?
    >
    > Appreciate your views/opinions/help!
    >
    > Cheers, @sh
    >



  3. Re: Networking a new office!

    Thanks Tevfik for your reply, perhaps as you're right, keeping the two VPN
    and Router elements would be safer too, we'll look into the brands you
    recommend.

    Its days like this that I wish I was outside working as a gardener, not
    stuck inside working on IT issues!!

    Cheers, @sh


    "Tevfik Koksal" wrote in message
    news:46512b72$0$12435$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > Hello Ash,
    >
    > As you know there are two forms of VPN, site-to-site and client-to-site.
    > Having said
    > this there are also multitudes of appliances out there which can solve
    > your
    > problem. Personally, I have used Netscreen, Cisco, Sonicwall, and a
    > foreign
    > appliance called I-Bekci. However; I have never worked on Draytek
    > routers/firewall appliance.
    >
    > Going back to your question, I am assuming your refering to client-to-site
    > vpn. If so I would suggest using a firewall appliance to service your vpn
    > needs rather than a router. Furthermore look into netscreen or Sonicwall
    > either one offer a solid three level encryption client-to-site vpn access.
    > Setup and deployment are pretty straight forward. Additionally these
    > appliances can be configured for DHCP and remote users those eliminating
    > any
    > radius, ldap or DHCP servers.
    >
    > I hope this helps.
    >
    > TK
    >
    >
    > "Ash" wrote in message
    > news:sL6dnQFUIY-ES9zbnZ2dnUVZ8qminZ2d@bt.com...
    >> Guys,
    >>
    >> I've been asked to Spec and Implement a new office installation that
    >> allows connectivity to it from remote locations. I'd just like some
    >> opinions on whether this setup would be endorsed by you guys as
    >> acceptable and also whether it would be secure enough.
    >>
    >> I invisage using a Cisco or Draytek router with VPN capability straight
    >> into the router, therefore removing the need for software solutions, that
    >> crash (good 'ole Microsoft!).
    >>
    >> All users are using POP3 and not exchange so I see no reason to implement
    >> any such exchange server. Instead however they require shared file
    >> storage. We're massive fans of the Buffalo Terastation (a NAS Linux box),
    >> in 2 years it hasn't required a single reboot and is very stable, also
    >> Raid compliant from the factory with 4 discs inside it. I would map
    >> appropriate drives on each clients machine to the NAS server for access
    >> to shared documents.
    >>
    >> Finally, dialing in via the secure VPN would give you a local IP on the
    >> network, allowing access to the Terastation NAS device, and any
    >> printers/shared resources within the office from any location.
    >>
    >> Does this sound sufficiently secure/feasible providing the router itself
    >> is of good specification and incorporates some form of firewall?
    >>
    >> Appreciate your views/opinions/help!
    >>
    >> Cheers, @sh
    >>

    >




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