IP camera, two routers, and making them talk - Connectivity

This is a discussion on IP camera, two routers, and making them talk - Connectivity ; Hi Here's my situation- I have a Mobotix M1M camera ( www.mobotix.com ) and it's upstairs of our house. I have it attached into the WAN port of a Netgear WGR514 router. I want this router to talk to the ...

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Thread: IP camera, two routers, and making them talk

  1. IP camera, two routers, and making them talk

    Hi
    Here's my situation- I have a Mobotix M1M camera (www.mobotix.com)
    and
    it's upstairs of our house. I have it attached into the WAN port of a
    Netgear WGR514 router. I want this router to talk to the main router
    downstairs and allow the broadcast of the camera. Conversely, I'd
    like
    the upstairs router to act as a repeater for the network.

    Can someone help me configure this setup?

    The Camera's IP is 192.168.1.101~ it has a factory default of
    10.0.98.254 but the 192.168.1.101 works fine.
    The Upstairs Router is 192.168.1.1
    The downstairs router is 192.168.0.1

    Any help is mucho appreciated..

    ~B


  2. Re: IP camera, two routers, and making them talk

    On Feb 7, 7:02 pm, "BillRayDrums" wrote:
    > Hi
    > Here's my situation- I have a Mobotix M1M camera (www.mobotix.com)
    > and
    > it's upstairs of our house. I have it attached into the WAN port of a
    > Netgear WGR514 router. I want this router to talk to the main router
    > downstairs and allow the broadcast of the camera. Conversely, I'd
    > like
    > the upstairs router to act as a repeater for the network.
    >
    > Can someone help me configure this setup?
    >
    > The Camera's IP is 192.168.1.101~ it has a factory default of
    > 10.0.98.254 but the 192.168.1.101 works fine.
    > The Upstairs Router is 192.168.1.1
    > The downstairs router is 192.168.0.1
    >
    > Any help is mucho appreciated..
    >
    > ~B

    Source: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...orking/expert/
    russel_05feb.mspx
    Configure a Network with Multiple Routers
    As more of us set up home networks with both wireless and wired
    devices, our networks become increasingly complicated. One question
    I've run into repeatedly in the newsgroups is how to configure and
    connect a wireless router (also known as a wireless gateway) when
    adding it to a network that uses a wired router.

    The first answer, actually, is to not buy a wireless router if you
    already have a wired router-get a wireless access point (AP). They
    generally cost about the same as a router, but are specifically
    designed to do what you need. But for those of you who already have a
    router, here are some basic configuration steps.

    1.
    Ideally, only one router should act as a Dynamic Host Configuration
    Protocol (DHCP) server. You can choose which one, but generally it
    should be the one directly connected to the DSL/cable modem. Disable
    the DHCP server on the second router.

    2.
    Or you can carefully configure them both to act as DHCP servers, but
    use different address ranges of the same address prefix defined for
    the subnet. For example, I could configure the wired router to hand
    out DHCP addresses in the range from 192.168.0.50-192.168.0.99, while
    configuring the wireless router to serve out addresses in the
    192.168.0.100-192.168.0.149 range, as shown in Figure 4. The catch
    here is that the default address range for the two routers may be
    different, especially if they came from different manufacturers. If
    they are, you'll need to change them so that they're both part of the
    address range being used on the home network subnet.



    Figure 4


    3.
    Configure the second router to be a bridge, not a router. Not all
    routers will do this, however. Check the software for the two routers
    you have, and if only one of them can act as a bridge, set it up to do
    bridging and connect the other one to the cable/DSL modem. My D-Link
    wireless router won't act as a bridge, so I would have to connect it
    to the DSL modem.



  3. Re: IP camera, two routers, and making them talk

    On Feb 9, 7:50 pm, "sha" wrote:
    > On Feb 7, 7:02 pm, "BillRayDrums" wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi
    > > Here's my situation- I have a Mobotix M1M camera (www.mobotix.com)
    > > and
    > > it's upstairs of our house. I have it attached into the WAN port of a
    > > Netgear WGR514 router. I want this router to talk to the main router
    > > downstairs and allow the broadcast of the camera. Conversely, I'd
    > > like
    > > the upstairs router to act as a repeater for the network.

    >
    > > Can someone help me configure this setup?

    >
    > > The Camera's IP is 192.168.1.101~ it has a factory default of
    > > 10.0.98.254 but the 192.168.1.101 works fine.
    > > The Upstairs Router is 192.168.1.1
    > > The downstairs router is 192.168.0.1

    >
    > > Any help is mucho appreciated..

    >
    > > ~B

    >
    > Source:http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...orking/expert/
    > russel_05feb.mspx
    > Configure a Network with Multiple Routers
    > As more of us set up home networks with both wireless and wired
    > devices, our networks become increasingly complicated. One question
    > I've run into repeatedly in the newsgroups is how to configure and
    > connect a wireless router (also known as a wireless gateway) when
    > adding it to a network that uses a wired router.
    >
    > The first answer, actually, is to not buy a wireless router if you
    > already have a wired router-get a wireless access point (AP). They
    > generally cost about the same as a router, but are specifically
    > designed to do what you need. But for those of you who already have a
    > router, here are some basic configuration steps.
    >
    > 1.
    > Ideally, only one router should act as a Dynamic Host Configuration
    > Protocol (DHCP) server. You can choose which one, but generally it
    > should be the one directly connected to the DSL/cable modem. Disable
    > the DHCP server on the second router.
    >
    > 2.
    > Or you can carefully configure them both to act as DHCP servers, but
    > use different address ranges of the same address prefix defined for
    > the subnet. For example, I could configure the wired router to hand
    > out DHCP addresses in the range from 192.168.0.50-192.168.0.99, while
    > configuring the wireless router to serve out addresses in the
    > 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.149 range, as shown in Figure 4. The catch
    > here is that the default address range for the two routers may be
    > different, especially if they came from different manufacturers. If
    > they are, you'll need to change them so that they're both part of the
    > address range being used on the home network subnet.
    >
    > Figure 4
    >
    > 3.
    > Configure the second router to be a bridge, not a router. Not all
    > routers will do this, however. Check the software for the two routers
    > you have, and if only one of them can act as a bridge, set it up to do
    > bridging and connect the other one to the cable/DSL modem. My D-Link
    > wireless router won't act as a bridge, so I would have to connect it
    > to the DSL modem.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...02april22.mspx


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