Looking for some expert advice here, TIA - Connectivity

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Thread: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA

  1. Looking for some expert advice here, TIA

    My company has two networks. One is a domain, one is a file
    server/workgroup, both connected to the same Cisco1760 router.

    My boss asked me to look into being able to combine or add them together.

    I understand that subnetting maybe a possibility, however, I was hoping
    there maybe a

    more simple solution...Since subnetting is over my head.......

    Thanks in advance,

    --
    ETEMCO
    Greg Eshleman
    1370 Arcadia Rd
    Lancaster, PA 17601
    717-393-9653



  2. Re: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA


    "Greg Eshleman" wrote in message
    news:RLWdnY-LoYSuLHzZnZ2dnUVZ_sidnZ2d@dejazzd.com...
    > My company has two networks. One is a domain, one is a file
    > server/workgroup, both connected to the same Cisco1760 router.
    >
    > My boss asked me to look into being able to combine or add them together.
    >
    > I understand that subnetting maybe a possibility, however, I was hoping
    > there maybe a
    >
    > more simple solution...Since subnetting is over my head.......
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > --
    > ETEMCO
    > Greg Eshleman
    > 1370 Arcadia Rd
    > Lancaster, PA 17601
    > 717-393-9653


    Greg,
    I'm not certain what you mean when you refer to a "domain," but it sounds
    like you're using the wrong term. You also negelcted to mention how many
    computers are on the workgroup with the file server. Are you using VOIP for
    phone service? There's quite a few factors that will enter into making your
    office network operate efficiently. And, yes, the solution will involve
    subnetting.

    Your router is a nice one for the application. Here's a link for the
    documentation to it:
    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/...227/index.html
    Pete



  3. Re: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA

    Let me try to explain a little better

    My company is actually two seperate companies....

    Company A's network is setup with Windows Server 2003 as a domain server and
    6 clients through a switch which is connected to the router.

    Company B's network is a simple peer to peer network with about 12 computers
    going to a switch that is also connected to the router. There is also an XP
    Pro machine designated as a file server.

    Now what my company would like to be able to do is eliminate the workgroup
    or peer to peer network and connect all the computers
    as clients through the Windows Server 2003 computer.

    Does that make more sense? I do have a learning curve with the Server setup,
    the peer to peer setup I understand fairly well.




    "Pete" wrote in message
    news:w4ydncQvgvtNyWPZnZ2dnUVZ_oednZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >
    > "Greg Eshleman" wrote in message
    > news:RLWdnY-LoYSuLHzZnZ2dnUVZ_sidnZ2d@dejazzd.com...
    >> My company has two networks. One is a domain, one is a file
    >> server/workgroup, both connected to the same Cisco1760 router.
    >>
    >> My boss asked me to look into being able to combine or add them together.
    >>
    >> I understand that subnetting maybe a possibility, however, I was hoping
    >> there maybe a
    >>
    >> more simple solution...Since subnetting is over my head.......
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance,
    >>
    >> --
    >> ETEMCO
    >> Greg Eshleman
    >> 1370 Arcadia Rd
    >> Lancaster, PA 17601
    >> 717-393-9653

    >
    > Greg,
    > I'm not certain what you mean when you refer to a "domain," but it sounds
    > like you're using the wrong term. You also negelcted to mention how many
    > computers are on the workgroup with the file server. Are you using VOIP
    > for phone service? There's quite a few factors that will enter into
    > making your office network operate efficiently. And, yes, the solution
    > will involve subnetting.
    >
    > Your router is a nice one for the application. Here's a link for the
    > documentation to it:
    > http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/...227/index.html
    > Pete
    >




  4. Re: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA

    "Greg Eshleman" wrote:

    > Let me try to explain a little better
    >
    > My company is actually two seperate companies....
    >
    > Company A's network is setup with Windows Server 2003 as a domain server
    > and 6 clients through a switch which is connected to the router.
    >
    > Company B's network is a simple peer to peer network with about 12
    > computers going to a switch that is also connected to the router. There is
    > also an XP Pro machine designated as a file server.
    >
    > Now what my company would like to be able to do is eliminate the workgroup
    > or peer to peer network and connect all the computers
    > as clients through the Windows Server 2003 computer.
    >
    > Does that make more sense? I do have a learning curve with the Server
    > setup, the peer to peer setup I understand fairly well.
    >


    Yes it makes sense... I've never used windows servers, but I do know the
    basics of setting up and running servers. If you were using FreeBSD or
    Linux, I could have you up and running in few minutes.

    Anyway, the first thing you need to do is look at the V-Face on the windows
    server 2003. lo0 I would guess and then rl0, rl1, and ed0. If I'm not
    mistaken (Your Goal) is to merge and allocate one user interface for all
    systems? Before I get into this, is that what you're wanting to do?





  5. Re: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA

    If both companies are in the same location and network you merely need to
    take the 12 computers in the work group and add them to the domain by going
    to the Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> System and click the Change
    button to switch the computers in the workgroup to the domain.

    If they companies are in different locations you will need to be sure they
    have some permanent connectivity between the two locations. This can be
    done by router, RRAS, or a host of other solutions that you will need to
    look into to find the best for you.


    "Timmy" wrote in message
    news:XuqOg.181$q%3.156@newsfe06.lga...
    > "Greg Eshleman" wrote:
    >
    >> Let me try to explain a little better
    >>
    >> My company is actually two seperate companies....
    >>
    >> Company A's network is setup with Windows Server 2003 as a domain server
    >> and 6 clients through a switch which is connected to the router.
    >>
    >> Company B's network is a simple peer to peer network with about 12
    >> computers going to a switch that is also connected to the router. There
    >> is
    >> also an XP Pro machine designated as a file server.
    >>
    >> Now what my company would like to be able to do is eliminate the
    >> workgroup
    >> or peer to peer network and connect all the computers
    >> as clients through the Windows Server 2003 computer.
    >>
    >> Does that make more sense? I do have a learning curve with the Server
    >> setup, the peer to peer setup I understand fairly well.
    >>

    >
    > Yes it makes sense... I've never used windows servers, but I do know the
    > basics of setting up and running servers. If you were using FreeBSD or
    > Linux, I could have you up and running in few minutes.
    >
    > Anyway, the first thing you need to do is look at the V-Face on the
    > windows
    > server 2003. lo0 I would guess and then rl0, rl1, and ed0. If I'm not
    > mistaken (Your Goal) is to merge and allocate one user interface for all
    > systems? Before I get into this, is that what you're wanting to do?
    >
    >
    >
    >




  6. Re: Looking for some expert advice here, TIA


    "Pete" wrote in message
    news:w4ydncQvgvtNyWPZnZ2dnUVZ_oednZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >
    > "Greg Eshleman" wrote in message
    > news:RLWdnY-LoYSuLHzZnZ2dnUVZ_sidnZ2d@dejazzd.com...
    >> My company has two networks. One is a domain, one is a file
    >> server/workgroup, both connected to the same Cisco1760 router.
    >>
    >> My boss asked me to look into being able to combine or add them together.
    >>
    >> I understand that subnetting maybe a possibility, however, I was hoping
    >> there maybe a
    >>
    >> more simple solution...Since subnetting is over my head.......
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance,
    >>
    >> --
    >> ETEMCO
    >> Greg Eshleman
    >> 1370 Arcadia Rd
    >> Lancaster, PA 17601
    >> 717-393-9653

    >
    > Greg,
    > I'm not certain what you mean when you refer to a "domain," but it sounds
    > like you're using the wrong term. You also negelcted to mention how many
    > computers are on the workgroup with the file server. Are you using VOIP
    > for phone service? There's quite a few factors that will enter into
    > making your office network operate efficiently. And, yes, the solution
    > will involve subnetting.
    >
    > Your router is a nice one for the application. Here's a link for the
    > documentation to it:
    > http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/...227/index.html
    > Pete
    >


    Hi,

    Motorola Phone (below) has given the correct answer, but with some things to
    look out for:

    1. In a W2K3 AD domain, the DNS server for the client has to be the DC
    (Domain Controller). You may already know this but if you are unfamiliar
    with subnets you will need to route between the LANs.

    2. Once a machine has been attached to the domain, you will need to copy the
    old users Document and Settings to the new user

    If you have to keep separate subnets, remember to get the routing correct
    and to enable NetBios over TCPIP.

    if the two companies should not be able to see each others data, think about
    permissions.

    Do both LANs use the same Internet access? If not, then you need to add the
    new route to all machines (via DHCP is the easiest). If your cisco router
    is the default gateway for both LANs then your routing problem will
    disappear!

    Mike.






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