need advice for setting up network - Connectivity

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Thread: need advice for setting up network

  1. need advice for setting up network

    I have an established ethernet network through cat5 cable in my
    building. I recently acquired a small office in the building next door.
    I want to be able to link a machine over there to the network in the
    main building. As it is not feasible to lay a cable across to the other
    building, that machine will have to be wireless.

    I've never done anything with wireless lan setups before.
    I want to be able to retain the wired network and somehow link the
    machine with a wireless network card into the existing network.
    Is this possible? Is there some sort of gizmo I can plug into an
    ethernet hub which will receive the wireless traffic from the remote PC
    and integrate it seamlessly into the existing network.

    Also the remote machine's physical distance from the main network
    "straight through the walls" is approximately 20-25 metres... is that
    too far to expect a satisfactory signal from a wireless lan card?

    Any help appreciated

    Fred

  2. Re: need advice for setting up network

    This isn't all that complicated. All you need to do is grab a wireless
    router and patch it to your existing ethernet hub/switch via LAN ports.
    Assuming you already have a DHCP server, gateway, etc., you disable these
    features on the wireless router, since they are redundant. Patching may
    require a crossover cable, or a standard cable will do if one of the units
    has an uplink port, or supports MDI/MDIX.

    You could also just buy a wireless access point, but they tend to be much
    more expensive (min $80, often higher). But the basic AP features available
    in a typical consumer model of router is usually more than adequate.
    Purchasing a cheap wireless router vs. a dedicated access point could save
    you considerable expense. Of course, you could just replace your existing
    wired hub/switch/router with a wireless router (most have at least 3-4 LAN
    ports). But if you want to continue using your existing huh/switch/router,
    then patching a wireless router/AP to it is a simple solution, and will add
    LAN ports in the process.

    As far as quality of reception, the only way to know is try it. There's
    always the possibility of local issues/interference. But in general, 50-75
    ft. is not going to be an issue, you may simply not get the optimal
    performance. And you can always choose one of the new MIMO wireless routers
    which extends range quite a bit. I use an 802.11g router across two floors,
    a staircase, a couple walls, about 50 ft., and reception is decent
    (18-22mbps). I recommend a wireless router w/ detachable antenna so you can
    optionally purchase a high-gain directional antenna, should reception prove
    a problem. Some models, like those from Belkin, have a permanently attached
    antenna, yuck.

    But overall, this is pretty simply setup, much less complicated than you
    might have expected.

    HTH

    Jim


    "fred" wrote in message
    news:437894c5$1@duster.adelaide.on.net...
    > I have an established ethernet network through cat5 cable in my
    > building. I recently acquired a small office in the building next door.
    > I want to be able to link a machine over there to the network in the
    > main building. As it is not feasible to lay a cable across to the other
    > building, that machine will have to be wireless.
    >
    > I've never done anything with wireless lan setups before.
    > I want to be able to retain the wired network and somehow link the
    > machine with a wireless network card into the existing network.
    > Is this possible? Is there some sort of gizmo I can plug into an
    > ethernet hub which will receive the wireless traffic from the remote PC
    > and integrate it seamlessly into the existing network.
    >
    > Also the remote machine's physical distance from the main network
    > "straight through the walls" is approximately 20-25 metres... is that
    > too far to expect a satisfactory signal from a wireless lan card?
    >
    > Any help appreciated
    >
    > Fred




  3. Re: need advice for setting up network

    The advice is good. Distance could be a problem and the newer preN routers
    from Belkin and Linksys have a noticeable
    greater range than the G router. I recommend going the N route. Adding the
    new wireless router to your existing router would work as "Jim" suggests.
    Place it as close to the window/wall facing the office as you can. As Jim
    says, disable DHCP on the 2nd router and configure it as a router and not as
    a gateway.
    Costs a bit more, but should be worth it. You don't even need an N adapter
    in the computer to pick up on the extended range. A G card will work OK.
    However, I do recommend going with a router and adapter from the same
    company. In theory any one should work, BUT, should you need help, Belkin
    will blame Linksys and vice versa.



    "Jim" wrote in message news:uk5ef.130$yp6.105@fed1read07...
    > This isn't all that complicated. All you need to do is grab a wireless
    > router and patch it to your existing ethernet hub/switch via LAN ports.
    > Assuming you already have a DHCP server, gateway, etc., you disable these
    > features on the wireless router, since they are redundant. Patching may
    > require a crossover cable, or a standard cable will do if one of the units
    > has an uplink port, or supports MDI/MDIX.
    >
    > You could also just buy a wireless access point, but they tend to be much
    > more expensive (min $80, often higher). But the basic AP features
    > available
    > in a typical consumer model of router is usually more than adequate.
    > Purchasing a cheap wireless router vs. a dedicated access point could save
    > you considerable expense. Of course, you could just replace your existing
    > wired hub/switch/router with a wireless router (most have at least 3-4 LAN
    > ports). But if you want to continue using your existing
    > huh/switch/router,
    > then patching a wireless router/AP to it is a simple solution, and will
    > add
    > LAN ports in the process.
    >
    > As far as quality of reception, the only way to know is try it. There's
    > always the possibility of local issues/interference. But in general,
    > 50-75
    > ft. is not going to be an issue, you may simply not get the optimal
    > performance. And you can always choose one of the new MIMO wireless
    > routers
    > which extends range quite a bit. I use an 802.11g router across two
    > floors,
    > a staircase, a couple walls, about 50 ft., and reception is decent
    > (18-22mbps). I recommend a wireless router w/ detachable antenna so you
    > can
    > optionally purchase a high-gain directional antenna, should reception
    > prove
    > a problem. Some models, like those from Belkin, have a permanently
    > attached
    > antenna, yuck.
    >
    > But overall, this is pretty simply setup, much less complicated than you
    > might have expected.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "fred" wrote in message
    > news:437894c5$1@duster.adelaide.on.net...
    >> I have an established ethernet network through cat5 cable in my
    >> building. I recently acquired a small office in the building next door.
    >> I want to be able to link a machine over there to the network in the
    >> main building. As it is not feasible to lay a cable across to the other
    >> building, that machine will have to be wireless.
    >>
    >> I've never done anything with wireless lan setups before.
    >> I want to be able to retain the wired network and somehow link the
    >> machine with a wireless network card into the existing network.
    >> Is this possible? Is there some sort of gizmo I can plug into an
    >> ethernet hub which will receive the wireless traffic from the remote PC
    >> and integrate it seamlessly into the existing network.
    >>
    >> Also the remote machine's physical distance from the main network
    >> "straight through the walls" is approximately 20-25 metres... is that
    >> too far to expect a satisfactory signal from a wireless lan card?
    >>
    >> Any help appreciated
    >>
    >> Fred

    >
    >




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