trying to extend a network - Connectivity

This is a discussion on trying to extend a network - Connectivity ; Greetings I currently have a network that someone else set up for me, and I now want to add another computer to the network, but have got lost! The existing network consists of a desktop PC wired to a Linksys ...

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Thread: trying to extend a network

  1. trying to extend a network

    Greetings

    I currently have a network that someone else set up for me, and I now want
    to add another computer to the network, but have got lost!

    The existing network consists of a desktop PC wired to a Linksys
    modem/router, and a laptop connecting via a wireless adapter. It all works
    perfectly well.

    I now have another desktop that I want in another room in the house. I have
    installed a wireless adapter PCI card (after installing the software as
    instructed).

    An icon has appeared in the taskbar, and when I run the mouse over it, it
    tells me it is ""Wireless Network Connection (xxxx)" (where xxxx is the name
    of the network) with excellent signal strength, but limited or no
    connectivity.

    I have tried doing a "repair" but the end message is "The network did not
    assign a network address to the computer"

    Can anyone please walk me through what I need to do to get this working.

    All 3 computers have Windows XP.

    More info on request of course.

    Cheers



  2. Re: trying to extend a network

    Oh God It's Him Again wrote:
    > Greetings


    >
    > I have tried doing a "repair" but the end message is "The network did not
    > assign a network address to the computer"
    >
    > Can anyone please walk me through what I need to do to get this working.
    >
    > All 3 computers have Windows XP.



    That error might be the clue. The machine is requesting a network
    address for itself from the router using the DHCP protocol, but for some
    reason isn't being given it.

    The most likely reason for this is that DHCP hasn't been enabled on the
    router. In turn this means that the machines currently on the network
    have fixed IP addresses, and you need to give your new machine a fixed
    IP address to.

    Check this by going to one of the machines that's on the network,
    getting a command prompt (type "cmd" on the "Run..." item of the Start
    bar) and typing "ipconfig /all" (without the inverted commas). I get the
    following:

    Windows 2000 IP Configuration

    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : monoplane
    Primary DNS Suffix . . . . . . . :
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcast
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : 3Com GigaW4NK4 XI
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-50-04-40-0D-5D
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.7.2
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.20.1
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 212.159.13.49
    212.159.13.50

    Which tells me that I have a fixed IP address, and it's 192.168.7.2 -
    i.e. I'm not using DHCP.

    Give your new machine an IP address in the same range - in my case that
    would be 192.168.7.3 (for example). All the other numbers (Gateway,
    etc.) should be the same.

    Hope that makes sense.

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