slow network - Connectivity

This is a discussion on slow network - Connectivity ; I am looking for some recommendations or ideas on how to cost effectively speed up our remote locations. We have branch offices in several states that connect via 64k frame relay. The mail server/domain controller for the entire company is ...

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Thread: slow network

  1. slow network

    I am looking for some recommendations or ideas on how to cost effectively
    speed up our remote locations. We have branch offices in several states that
    connect via 64k frame relay. The mail server/domain controller for the
    entire company is at the corporate office in one state with 12 sites across
    the country. At each remote site is a router and hub (10 mbps) and client
    machines. These machines also use the internet via an ISA server at the
    Corporate office. Opening email attachments is a nightmare, especially when
    people tend to send 1 to 2 mb excel spreadsheets. I thought that maybe if
    each site got it's own DSL and then used pop3 for email that at least email
    might be faster with little additional expense. Does anyone have any
    comments on that thought or any suggestions?



  2. Re: slow network


    "Terri" wrote in message
    news:10imb26camej4e4@corp.supernews.com...
    > I am looking for some recommendations or ideas on how to cost effectively
    > speed up our remote locations. We have branch offices in several states

    that
    > connect via 64k frame relay. The mail server/domain controller for the
    > entire company is at the corporate office in one state with 12 sites

    across
    > the country. At each remote site is a router and hub (10 mbps) and client
    > machines. These machines also use the internet via an ISA server at the
    > Corporate office. Opening email attachments is a nightmare, especially

    when
    > people tend to send 1 to 2 mb excel spreadsheets. I thought that maybe if
    > each site got it's own DSL and then used pop3 for email that at least

    email
    > might be faster with little additional expense. Does anyone have any
    > comments on that thought or any suggestions?


    Yes, that would correct your e-mail problem and definetly speed up your
    network (for about the same or less $$).

    Larry



  3. Re: slow network

    [This followup was posted to alt.comp.networking.connectivity and a copy
    was sent to the cited author.]

    In article <10imb26camej4e4@corp.supernews.com>, nospam.ttremblay@dca-
    falcon.com says...
    > I am looking for some recommendations or ideas on how to cost effectively
    > speed up our remote locations. We have branch offices in several states that
    > connect via 64k frame relay. The mail server/domain controller for the
    > entire company is at the corporate office in one state with 12 sites across
    > the country. At each remote site is a router and hub (10 mbps) and client
    > machines. These machines also use the internet via an ISA server at the
    > Corporate office. Opening email attachments is a nightmare, especially when
    > people tend to send 1 to 2 mb excel spreadsheets. I thought that maybe if
    > each site got it's own DSL and then used pop3 for email that at least email
    > might be faster with little additional expense. Does anyone have any
    > comments on that thought or any suggestions?
    >
    >
    >

    There are a whole bunch of things you could do to help performance.

    1. Replace hubs with switches. Now reason to send junk to the router.

    2. Tune each router to contain broadcast packets and other LAN-only
    traffic to prevent it from using bandwidth on the frame circuits.

    3. Use IP compression to optimize the amount of data you can put on the
    line.

    I would ass DSL's for internet browsing but keep the corp mail off of
    those links. Instead by freeing up bandwidth, you will be able to pick
    up and send mail more effifiently. If you allow every office to get mail
    off the internet directly, you will introduce a bunch of new vectors for
    viruses and potential data loss.

    You could also put a mail server at each location, it could even be a
    lightly used desktop running XP Pro. You can get very small
    POP/IMAP/SMTP servers that run under windows. You can control mail
    delivery to them, via whatever mail system you use.

    Good luck, but don't just do the simplest appearing solution, you have a
    lot of potential areas to explore.

    ....Michael

    --
    --
    Michael Hyman
    Owner/Consultant
    OnTarget Solutions
    - Linux/Unix/Windows consulting
    - Network/Database/System Administration
    www.OnTargetSolutions.net | (510)907-0169

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