Joining 2 IP Ranges - Connectivity

This is a discussion on Joining 2 IP Ranges - Connectivity ; We have a small network at work, uses a private IP range (192.168.xxx.0) There's about 10 PCs and couple of servers , one of which runs DHCP to allocate IP addresses, a simple router and a broadband(ASDL) modem for access ...

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Thread: Joining 2 IP Ranges

  1. Joining 2 IP Ranges

    We have a small network at work, uses a private IP range (192.168.xxx.0)
    There's about 10 PCs and couple of servers , one of which runs DHCP to
    allocate IP addresses, a simple router and a broadband(ASDL) modem for
    access to the internet.

    My boss's house is adjacent to the work building, and he wants to install a
    wireless router in the house. This router will also run DHCP for the handful
    of PCs and laptops that he and his family use at home. He wants the IP range
    in the house to be a different one to the one in the work-building, so say
    work is 192.168.xxx.0 house is 192.168.yyy.0

    The tricky bit is that he wants the house to be able to access the internet
    via the broadband routers at work.

    What is the simplest(cheapest) way of joining these two networks so that
    this is possible?
    If anyone can recomend a specific product(make/model) that'd be a great
    start.

    Initially, he just plugged the wireless router into the main network switch,
    and having 2 DHCP servers on the network handing out different IP ranges
    caused me a bit of a headache, (not to mention some head scratching, until
    he told me about the new router!!)

    TIA for any help.

    --
    Regards,
    Chris.
    (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)



  2. Re: Joining 2 IP Ranges

    ChrisM wrote:
    > Initially, he just plugged the wireless router into the main network switch,
    > and having 2 DHCP servers on the network handing out different IP ranges
    > caused me a bit of a headache


    You could use an ethernet router, which would be plugged with its WAN(!)
    port into the office network. That way, both networks would stay
    separated, but internet access would work:

    --- --
    |
    --

    Whether or not you would use NAT is up to you. There is no need for a
    NAT, but if you don't use NAT you will need to create a static route for
    the private network on your office DSL router, like this:

    (assuming the Home Router's IP address on the office LAN is
    192.168.xxx.254.)

    Home Router:
    Destination Gateway Netmask
    192.168.yyy.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
    0.0.0.0 192.168.xxx.1 0.0.0.0

    Office Router:
    Destination Gateway Netmask
    192.168.xxx.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
    192.168.yyy.0 192.168.xxx.254 255.255.255.0
    0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0

    Using NAT on the office Router, you don't have to care about routing at all.


    Hth,
    Michael

  3. Re: Joining 2 IP Ranges

    Michael Ziegler wrote:
    > Using NAT on the office Router, you don't have to care about routing at
    > all.


    Oops typo, meant the Home router there.


    M

  4. Re: Joining 2 IP Ranges

    In message fnpha2$8f2$1@cb.generation-online.de,
    Michael Ziegler Proclaimed from the tallest
    tower:

    > ChrisM wrote:
    >> Initially, he just plugged the wireless router into the main network
    >> switch, and having 2 DHCP servers on the network handing out
    >> different IP ranges caused me a bit of a headache

    >
    > You could use an ethernet router, which would be plugged with its
    > WAN(!) port into the office network. That way, both networks would
    > stay separated, but internet access would work:
    >
    > --- --
    > |
    > --
    >
    > Whether or not you would use NAT is up to you. There is no need for a
    > NAT, but if you don't use NAT you will need to create a static route
    > for the private network on your office DSL router, like this:
    >
    > (assuming the Home Router's IP address on the office LAN is
    > 192.168.xxx.254.)
    >
    > Home Router:
    > Destination Gateway Netmask
    > 192.168.yyy.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.xxx.1 0.0.0.0
    >
    > Office Router:
    > Destination Gateway Netmask
    > 192.168.xxx.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.yyy.0 192.168.xxx.254 255.255.255.0
    > 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0
    >
    > Using NAT on the office Router, you don't have to care about routing
    > at all.
    >
    > Hth,
    > Michael


    Thanks for all that Michael, I was thinking about this last night, and I was
    wondering if the WAN port of a additional small router into the Office
    network would do the trick. You have just confirmed my suspicions...
    NAT seems like the easiest solution, but I can play around with that or set
    up some routes as you suggest.


    --
    Regards,
    Chris.
    (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)



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