3.9 AMD64 date command Wierdness - BSD

This is a discussion on 3.9 AMD64 date command Wierdness - BSD ; I just installed OpenBSD 3.9 AMD 64-bit version on a new AMD computer. This computer is still not connected to the internet. I noticed that date was printing out times 4 hours earlier than correct for /US/East-Indiana.(ie date printed a ...

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Thread: 3.9 AMD64 date command Wierdness

  1. 3.9 AMD64 date command Wierdness

    I just installed OpenBSD 3.9 AMD 64-bit version
    on a new AMD computer. This computer is still not
    connected to the internet. I noticed that date was
    printing out times 4 hours earlier than correct for
    /US/East-Indiana.(ie date printed a time of 5am when
    the correct time here is 9am). I catted /etc/localtimezone
    and got about 400 geeky characters. I then did an ls -l
    of /etc/localtimezone which reported a symlink to
    /US/East-Indiana and a file length of 36 characters.
    I then deleted /etc/localtimezone and invoking date
    then returned the correct time.

    Can anyone explain this?

    Thanks,
    Dave Feustel

    --
    Using OpenBSD with or without X & KDE?
    http://dfeustel.home.mindspring.com

  2. Re: 3.9 AMD64 date command Wierdness

    dfeustel@mindspring.com wrote:
    > I just installed OpenBSD 3.9 AMD 64-bit version
    > on a new AMD computer. This computer is still not
    > connected to the internet. I noticed that date was
    > printing out times 4 hours earlier than correct for
    > /US/East-Indiana.(ie date printed a time of 5am when
    > the correct time here is 9am). I catted /etc/localtimezone
    > and got about 400 geeky characters. I then did an ls -l
    > of /etc/localtimezone which reported a symlink to
    > /US/East-Indiana and a file length of 36 characters.
    > I then deleted /etc/localtimezone and invoking date
    > then returned the correct time.
    >
    > Can anyone explain this?


    Your computer clock is set to local time, not UTC. This is mentioned in
    many, many places, including
    http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq8.html#TimeZone.

    Joachim

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