OpenBSD & MirOS - BSD

This is a discussion on OpenBSD & MirOS - BSD ; I have used FreeBSD, and am interested in trying OpenBSD. There's an OS purported to be a variant of OpenBSD, MirOS. It seems to be pretty new, and have only a few developers. However, it also claims to have some ...

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Thread: OpenBSD & MirOS

  1. OpenBSD & MirOS

    I have used FreeBSD, and am interested in trying OpenBSD. There's an OS
    purported to be a variant of OpenBSD, MirOS. It seems to be pretty new,
    and have only a few developers. However, it also claims to have some
    refinements, such as allowing a boot partition to be beyond 1023 cyl
    (which all Linux distros after the 2.2 kernel have done). Is it worthwhile
    to try MirOS? Or would it be better to stick with the better-known OpenBSD?

    --
    Robert T. Kopp
    http://analytic.tripod.com/

  2. Re: OpenBSD & MirOS

    Robert Kopp wrote:
    > I have used FreeBSD, and am interested in trying OpenBSD. There's an OS
    > purported to be a variant of OpenBSD, MirOS. It seems to be pretty new,
    > and have only a few developers. However, it also claims to have some
    > refinements, such as allowing a boot partition to be beyond 1023 cyl
    > (which all Linux distros after the 2.2 kernel have done). Is it worthwhile
    > to try MirOS? Or would it be better to stick with the better-known OpenBSD?


    You'll have to see for yourself, but from reading the OpenBSD lists,
    they appear to produce more noise than code.

    This does not mean that MirOS might not have some refinements, of
    course. But it is also likely to have interesting bugs.

    Joachim

  3. Re: OpenBSD & MirOS

    Robert Kopp wrote:
    > I have used FreeBSD, and am interested in trying OpenBSD. There's an OS
    > purported to be a variant of OpenBSD, MirOS. It seems to be pretty new,
    > and have only a few developers. However, it also claims to have some
    > refinements, such as allowing a boot partition to be beyond 1023 cyl
    > (which all Linux distros after the 2.2 kernel have done). Is it worthwhile
    > to try MirOS? Or would it be better to stick with the better-known OpenBSD?
    >


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MirOS_BSD

    Seems to me that the intent was a more Euro-friendly free OS. Whether
    or not this matches with your requirements is up to you.

  4. Re: OpenBSD & MirOS

    > I have used FreeBSD, and am interested in trying OpenBSD. There's an OS
    > purported to be a variant of OpenBSD, MirOS. It seems to be pretty new,
    > and have only a few developers. However, it also claims to have some
    > refinements, such as allowing a boot partition to be beyond 1023 cyl
    > (which all Linux distros after the 2.2 kernel have done). Is it worthwhile
    > to try MirOS? Or would it be better to stick with the better-known OpenBSD?


    Look at MirOs this way:
    - it contains a subset of OpenBSD's code (e.g. no NIS support).
    - it is compiled with the gcc `du jour' and non-wisely choosen compiler
    options, and as a result needs a lot of workarounds there and there to
    get semi-working binaries because compiling with -fenable-bells
    -fdo-whistles -foh-look-yet-another-shiny-flag only works for Gentoo
    users.
    - its codebase lags behind OpenBSD, so features, fixes and improvements
    may not be present.
    - it has new interfaces to allow userland to mess with the kernel
    randomness pool, to make it easy to make your tcp timestamps and your
    ssh-keygen results predictable.
    - it has zero release engineering. The release date for the next release
    is an ever moving target between ``never'' and ``not this year, and
    not the next one either''. Sure, experimental snapshots with
    pick-a-random-vital-feature broken are released at irregular times,
    for the naively hopeful person.
    - it only runs on not-shiny-new single-processor i386 systems. Too bad
    for your new amd64 machine. Or even your new Dell Pentium which needs
    pci code fixes which are not into MirBSD and won't be tested anyway,
    so you'll be experiencing the merge error the hard way.

    On the other hand, it features a very recent Lynx browser, and can run
    as a Live CD.

    BTW, the ``can't boot above cyl #1023'' limitation of OpenBSD/i386
    bootcode has been fixed years ago.

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