OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook? - BSD

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Thread: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

  1. OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    Hi folks,

    Is this a place where a BSD newbie can ask stupid questions with some
    hope of getting sensible answers?

    A little about myself:

    I've been running Linux for over half a decade (mostly Debian in the
    last few years) and I have a background in programming and electronic
    design, so I'm not a total luser. Some of my software education was in
    the use of formal methods for software development, which still isn't
    done much except in safety-critical systems such as aerospace. (No, I
    haven't done any aerospace work.) From what I've read about OpenBSD
    you folks take correctness and security seriously, and that's what I'm
    looking for in an operating system.

    I'm considering buying a Sony Vaio VGN-FE15GP notebook and I'd like to
    be able to run OpenBSD on it. I was hoping some of you could look over
    the specs and tell me whether I am going to have major difficulties
    getting the important parts of OpenBSD to work.

    For the original specs, go to:

    http://vaio-online.sony.com/prod_inf...fications.html

    Here are some of the highlights (excuse the uneven editing):

    GN-FE15GP
    Intel® Centrino® Duo Mobile Technology
    Intel® Core™ Duo Processor T2300 (1.66GHz) *1
    Intel® PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection
    Intel® 945PM Express Chipset
    Processor System Bus 667MHz
    Memory Bus 533MHz
    Cache Memory L1 Cache: 64KB L2 Cache: 2MB (on CPU)
    Main Memory 512MB DDR2 SDRAM (upgradeable up to 2GB)*2
    (partially shared with video memory)*3
    2 SO-DIMM slots (The pre-installed
    memory module uses one)
    Hard Disk 80GB (C: 20GB, D: 60GB*4) Serial ATA, 5400rpm
    Optical Drive Dual Layer rewriter
    Graphics Accelerator •Dual display compatible
    •3D graphics acceleration compatible
    •NVIDIA® GeForce® Go 7400 with NVIDIA®

    TurboCache™*3 (PCI Express x16)
    Video Memory 256MB*3
    Display 15.4" Wide (WXGA: 1280 x 800) TFT colour display
    Interfaces •USB 2.0 x 3*6
    •i.LINK (IEEE 1394) S400 (4 pin) •S-Video Out connector
    •ExpressCard™/34 slot
    •Network (RJ-45) connector (100BASE-TX/10BASE-T)
    •Headphone jack (stereo mini)
    •Microphone jack (stereo mini)
    •Monitor connector (VGA, D-SUB 15 pin)
    •Modular (RJ-11) connector
    •Docking Station connector
    •Memory Stick Duo Slot*7 (MagicGate compatible,
    Memory Stick PRO Duo compatible, High-speed
    data transfer compatible)
    Wireless LAN •Integrated Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g*
    •Intel® PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection
    Bluetooth® standard version 2.0+EDR*9 •Output: maximum +6dBm •Frequency:
    Modem V.92 and V.90 Compliant
    PC Card (PCMCIA) Slot Type I/II x 1, CardBus Support
    Camera 310,000 pixels effective
    Image Device: OmniVision 1/5", VGA CMOS
    Built-in monaural microphone (front side)
    Audio •DSD compatible high quality sound chip: "Sound Reality"
    (Intel® High Definition Audio compatible)
    •3D audio (Direct Sound 3D support)
    Touchpad


    I tried to boot OpenBSD 3.8 on the Vaio but didn't get very far. A few
    screens of unfamiliar messages rolled by and then it all came to a
    screaming halt. I suppose I should've written down the last thing that
    appeared on the screen but it didn't seem very important since the
    obvious next thing to try is to download 3.9 and see if it fares any
    better.

    I was able to run Damn Small Linux 1.3.1 (I had it lying around and just
    thought I'd try it) but it didn't recognise a USB mouse (it did work
    with the built-in pointing device). Perhaps DSL needs to be specially
    reconfigured to work with an extra pointing device.

    I was able to run Knoppix 4.0.2 on one at the store (just around the
    corner (trying to support local business)) but I had to use acpi=off,
    noapic and pci=bios in order to do so, or else it only got as far as
    loading the cardmgr for PCMCIA before blanking the screen and hanging.
    The Knoppix F2 screen says that that's for buggy BIOSes. It's a Phoenix
    BIOS, BTW.

    Once Knoppix was up, it recognised the mouse but not my Creative Labs
    MuVo TX FM MP3 player as a flash drive. Strange, because the MuVo
    appeared okay under DSL on the Vaio. On my home computer, plugging in
    the MuVo eventually causes a new icon to pop up in Knoppix. Strange,
    because USB was definitely working, or else the mouse wouldn't work. I
    couldn't get sound to work under either DSL or Knoppix, though the mixer
    seemed to think there was some sort of Intel sound system under Knoppix.
    I don't know what DSD sound is, whether Sony's implementation of it is
    any good, or whether there are any decent drivers for it. I'm prepared
    to live without sound under Linux if that's necessary. Fortunately the
    (wired) networking Just Worked(TM), so that's a relief. Also, Nvidia
    has recently released Linux drivers that support the Go 7400 and can
    suspend, so there's hope for the 3d graphics subsystem, at least under
    Linux.

    From what I've done so far, it seems that I should be able to get Linux
    working on the thing, sort of, so I'm _probably_ going to go ahead and
    buy one with a gig of main memory.

    What I want to know from you people is how well the thing is likely to
    work under OpenBSD, and where the pitfalls are likely to be.

    Comments, anyone?


    Regards, Graeme.

  2. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    "RGC" wrote in message
    news:447d6bf0@news.comindico.com.au...
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > Is this a place where a BSD newbie can ask stupid questions with some hope
    > of getting sensible answers?


    Mostly. For various values of "sensible" .

    > I've been running Linux for over half a decade (mostly Debian in the last
    > few years) and I have a background in programming and electronic design,
    > so I'm not a total luser. Some of my software education was in the use of
    > formal methods for software development, which still isn't done much
    > except in safety-critical systems such as aerospace. (No, I haven't done
    > any aerospace work.) From what I've read about OpenBSD you folks take
    > correctness and security seriously, and that's what I'm looking for in an
    > operating system.


    My background is similar to yours, and like you, the OpenBSD mindset appeals
    to me greatly. I've been a convert since about '99, and am glad I am .

    > I'm considering buying a Sony Vaio VGN-FE15GP notebook and I'd like to be
    > able to run OpenBSD on it. I was hoping some of you could look over the
    > specs and tell me whether I am going to have major difficulties getting
    > the important parts of OpenBSD to work.


    I can't answer that directly (don't know the Vaio well enough), but the
    hardware compatibility list should help:
    http://www.openbsd.org/i386.html

    Re sound etc: traditionally OpenBSD has been stronger on server-side than
    client-side, but that has been changing recently...

    Hopefully others here will be able to answer more directly. Good luck.

    Steve
    http://www.fivetrees.com



  3. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    RGC wrote:
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > Is this a place where a BSD newbie can ask stupid questions with some
    > hope of getting sensible answers?


    For reasonable values of 'stupid', yes. And sensible answers are not
    always guaranteed.

    There is also openbsd-newbies and misc@openbsd.org. Especially the
    latter does require some lurking though.

    > A little about myself:
    >
    > I've been running Linux for over half a decade (mostly Debian in the
    > last few years) and I have a background in programming and electronic
    > design, so I'm not a total luser. Some of my software education was in
    > the use of formal methods for software development, which still isn't
    > done much except in safety-critical systems such as aerospace. (No, I
    > haven't done any aerospace work.) From what I've read about OpenBSD
    > you folks take correctness and security seriously, and that's what I'm
    > looking for in an operating system.
    >
    > I'm considering buying a Sony Vaio VGN-FE15GP notebook and I'd like to
    > be able to run OpenBSD on it. I was hoping some of you could look over
    > the specs and tell me whether I am going to have major difficulties
    > getting the important parts of OpenBSD to work.
    >
    > For the original specs, go to:
    >
    > http://vaio-online.sony.com/prod_inf...fications.html
    >
    > Here are some of the highlights (excuse the uneven editing):
    >
    > GN-FE15GP
    > Intel? Centrino? Duo Mobile Technology
    > Intel? Core? Duo Processor T2300 (1.66GHz) *1


    Embarassingly, I do not know if and how this works. I suppose bsd.mp
    (the SMP kernel) would be required.

    > Intel? PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection


    This card is supported by wpi(4), which was added in -current. I'm not
    sure if it is also compiled by default, but I believe this is the case.

    You'll need to pkg_add the firmware, though. Blame Intel.

    > Intel? 945PM Express Chipset


    If this bears any relation to graphics, I'm fairly confident there's
    a new port in -current that might be interesting to you -
    x11/915resolution.

    Not sure about the specifics, but that should give you at least a
    direction to Google in. ISTR it is related to using all of that nice
    wide screen you mention below...

    > Processor System Bus 667MHz
    > Memory Bus 533MHz
    > Cache Memory L1 Cache: 64KB L2 Cache: 2MB (on CPU)
    > Main Memory 512MB DDR2 SDRAM (upgradeable up to 2GB)*2
    > (partially shared with video memory)*3
    > 2 SO-DIMM slots (The pre-installed
    > memory module uses one)


    Fairly uninteresting to support, though it has more power than my main
    desktop computer I'm typing this at (my laptop, recently acquired, is a
    venerable Thinkpad 390X).

    > Hard Disk 80GB (C: 20GB, D: 60GB*4) Serial ATA, 5400rpm
    > Optical Drive Dual Layer rewriter


    Should work. Take a good look at the SATA adapter, though - it's very
    likely to be supported, but it would truly suck if it wasn't.

    > Graphics Accelerator ?Dual display compatible
    > ?3D graphics acceleration compatible
    > ?NVIDIA? GeForce? Go 7400 with NVIDIA?
    >
    > TurboCache?*3 (PCI Express x16)


    Not supported - no graphical card is. When you run OpenBSD, you'll have
    to make do with unaccelerated X.

    It will, of course, do unaccelerated X just fine.

    > Video Memory 256MB*3
    > Display 15.4" Wide (WXGA: 1280 x 800) TFT colour display


    This will be a pain to configure, also see my above note about
    x11/915resolution.

    > Interfaces ?USB 2.0 x 3*6

    Works.
    > ?i.LINK (IEEE 1394) S400 (4 pin) ?S-Video Out connector

    I wouldn't know about this.
    > ?ExpressCard?/34 slot

    No clue.
    > ?Network (RJ-45) connector (100BASE-TX/10BASE-T)
    > ?Headphone jack (stereo mini)
    > ?Microphone jack (stereo mini)
    > ?Monitor connector (VGA, D-SUB 15 pin)
    > ?Modular (RJ-11) connector
    > ?Docking Station connector
    > ?Memory Stick Duo Slot*7 (MagicGate compatible,
    > Memory Stick PRO Duo compatible, High-speed
    > data transfer compatible)

    No clue, you don't list the protocol (USB?).
    > Wireless LAN ?Integrated Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g*
    > ?Intel? PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection

    See above, about wpi(4).
    > Bluetooth? standard version 2.0+EDR*9 ?Output: maximum +6dBm ?Frequency:


    This isn't going to work - bluetooth isn't supported, really. Given the
    number of problems with the protocol, I'm not sure that is such a bad
    thing, either. ;-)

    > Modem V.92 and V.90 Compliant


    Unlikely to work - WinModems don't work under pretty much any *NIX, or,
    in fact, anything other than Windows.

    > PC Card (PCMCIA) Slot Type I/II x 1, CardBus Support


    Works fine.

    > Camera 310,000 pixels effective
    > Image Device: OmniVision 1/5", VGA CMOS

    No clue, probably not.
    > Built-in monaural microphone (front side)
    > Audio ?DSD compatible high quality sound chip: "Sound Reality"
    > (Intel? High Definition Audio compatible)
    > ?3D audio (Direct Sound 3D support)

    I wouldn't know about this.
    > Touchpad

    Should work.

    > I tried to boot OpenBSD 3.8 on the Vaio but didn't get very far. A few
    > screens of unfamiliar messages rolled by and then it all came to a
    > screaming halt. I suppose I should've written down the last thing that
    > appeared on the screen but it didn't seem very important since the
    > obvious next thing to try is to download 3.9 and see if it fares any
    > better.


    Actually, upgrading to -current seems to be the way. If you want to have
    the latest and greatest hardware, -current is probably the way to go -
    but you do get to keep the pieces.

    Wait until after the hackathon, though - -current is currently far too
    unstable. There are some slightly older and mostly functional snapshots
    on my server at
    http://jschipper.dynalias.net/pub/Op...snapshots/i386, but you would
    not be wise to trust some random usenet poster.

    Be aware, though, that running -current does mean that you're expected
    to be able to solve most smallish problems. In particular, the provided
    snapshots at http://www.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/i386 should be
    mostly functional, but the source tree might or might not build at any
    given moment.

    If you still have problems, post back with the messages you see. It's
    usually possible to get troublesome hardware to boot by disabling one or
    more devices - boot -c enables kernel configuration before boot, and
    'verbose' is a very useful command here.

    > I was able to run Damn Small Linux 1.3.1 (I had it lying around and just
    > thought I'd try it) but it didn't recognise a USB mouse (it did work
    > with the built-in pointing device). Perhaps DSL needs to be specially
    > reconfigured to work with an extra pointing device.
    >
    > I was able to run Knoppix 4.0.2 on one at the store (just around the
    > corner (trying to support local business)) but I had to use acpi=off,
    > noapic and pci=bios in order to do so, or else it only got as far as
    > loading the cardmgr for PCMCIA before blanking the screen and hanging.
    > The Knoppix F2 screen says that that's for buggy BIOSes. It's a Phoenix
    > BIOS, BTW.
    >
    > Once Knoppix was up, it recognised the mouse but not my Creative Labs
    > MuVo TX FM MP3 player as a flash drive. Strange, because the MuVo
    > appeared okay under DSL on the Vaio. On my home computer, plugging in
    > the MuVo eventually causes a new icon to pop up in Knoppix. Strange,
    > because USB was definitely working, or else the mouse wouldn't work. I
    > couldn't get sound to work under either DSL or Knoppix, though the mixer
    > seemed to think there was some sort of Intel sound system under Knoppix.
    > I don't know what DSD sound is, whether Sony's implementation of it is
    > any good, or whether there are any decent drivers for it. I'm prepared
    > to live without sound under Linux if that's necessary. Fortunately the
    > (wired) networking Just Worked(TM), so that's a relief. Also, Nvidia
    > has recently released Linux drivers that support the Go 7400 and can
    > suspend, so there's hope for the 3d graphics subsystem, at least under
    > Linux.
    >
    > From what I've done so far, it seems that I should be able to get Linux
    > working on the thing, sort of, so I'm _probably_ going to go ahead and
    > buy one with a gig of main memory.
    >
    > What I want to know from you people is how well the thing is likely to
    > work under OpenBSD, and where the pitfalls are likely to be.
    >
    > Comments, anyone?


    If you want to have a slightly less painful way to meet with OpenBSD -
    which is really nice but does not always support as much devices as
    Linux[1], especially where laptops are concerned - and really want to do so
    on a laptop, I'd prefer anything by IBM. The developers are Thinkpad
    junkies, so Thinkpads in particular tend to be well supported.

    Which is not to say that you should not be able to get the Intel one
    working with OpenBSD - most of it should be supported now, and work is
    definitely underway to add support for the rest - but between running a
    system you're not really familiar with, the usual troubles with
    -current, 'testing' some new drivers, and having generally difficult
    hardware, it might be more trouble than you'd be willing to go through.

    OTOH, it will teach you a lot about the internals. And it should be
    possible.

    Joachim

    [1] This is a bit of a hot topic in OpenBSD land.
    http://www.undeadly.org and the offical OpenBSD site are both
    campaigning for truly open drivers, instead of Linux' wrappers for
    binaries provided by vendors.

  4. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    Steve at fivetrees wrote:
    > "RGC" wrote in message
    > news:447d6bf0@news.comindico.com.au...
    >
    >>Hi folks,
    >>...

    >
    >
    >>I'm considering buying a Sony Vaio VGN-FE15GP notebook and I'd like to be
    >>able to run OpenBSD on it. I was hoping some of you could look over the
    >>specs and tell me whether I am going to have major difficulties getting
    >>the important parts of OpenBSD to work.

    >
    >
    > I can't answer that directly (don't know the Vaio well enough), but the
    > hardware compatibility list should help:
    > http://www.openbsd.org/i386.html


    Thanks, I'll take a look.

    > Re sound etc: traditionally OpenBSD has been stronger on server-side than
    > client-side, but that has been changing recently...


    I've noticed that. I'll probably want to run a firewall/wireless router
    on a PC at home, so I'm considering OpenBSD for that too.

    > Hopefully others here will be able to answer more directly. Good luck.


    Yeah, I've already seen one message that suggests that the wireless
    networking might work, which is good news.

    > Steve
    > http://www.fivetrees.com


    Thanks, Steve.


    Regards, Graeme.

  5. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    jKILLSPAM.schipper@math.uu.nl wrote:
    > RGC wrote:
    >
    >>Hi folks,
    >>...

    >
    > There is also openbsd-newbies and misc@openbsd.org. Especially the
    > latter does require some lurking though.


    Thanks, I'll look for it.
    >
    >


    >
    >
    > This card is supported by wpi(4), which was added in -current. I'm not
    > sure if it is also compiled by default, but I believe this is the case.


    :-) Thanks for the good news; I didn't expect the wireless to work under
    OpenBSD.

    > You'll need to pkg_add the firmware, though. Blame Intel.


    I do.

    >>Intel? 945PM Express Chipset

    >
    >
    > If this bears any relation to graphics, I'm fairly confident there's
    > a new port in -current that might be interesting to you -
    > x11/915resolution.


    I don't think it's graphics, except that it does supply the PCI Express
    interface that the graphics attaches to.

    >>Processor System Bus 667MHz
    >>Memory Bus 533MHz
    >>Cache Memory L1 Cache: 64KB L2 Cache: 2MB (on CPU)
    >>Main Memory 512MB DDR2 SDRAM (upgradeable up to 2GB)*2
    >> (partially shared with video memory)*3
    >> 2 SO-DIMM slots (The pre-installed
    >> memory module uses one)



    > Fairly uninteresting to support, though it has more power than my main
    > desktop computer I'm typing this at (my laptop, recently acquired, is a
    > venerable Thinkpad 390X).


    Yeah, It will be my main machine; not just an address book.
    I've been making do with an old box that has been upgraded quite a bit
    but has nevertheless been getting slower with code bloat, so it's time
    for a faster machine, and I want a notebook. The graphics acceleration
    is desirable for a software project I may become involved in, and for
    some simulations I want to run.

    >>Hard Disk 80GB (C: 20GB, D: 60GB*4) Serial ATA, 5400rpm
    >>Optical Drive Dual Layer rewriter

    >
    >
    > Should work. Take a good look at the SATA adapter, though - it's very
    > likely to be supported, but it would truly suck if it wasn't.


    Too true.

    >>Graphics Accelerator ?Dual display compatible
    >> ?3D graphics acceleration compatible
    >> ?NVIDIA? GeForce? Go 7400 with NVIDIA?
    >>
    >> TurboCache?*3 (PCI Express x16)

    >
    >
    > Not supported - no graphical card is. When you run OpenBSD, you'll have
    > to make do with unaccelerated X.
    >
    > It will, of course, do unaccelerated X just fine.


    I can live with that.

    >>Video Memory 256MB*3
    >>Display 15.4" Wide (WXGA: 1280 x 800) TFT colour display

    >
    >
    > This will be a pain to configure, also see my above note about
    > x11/915resolution.


    Yeah, I'll have to look into setting up X. So far I've been able to get
    away with just using tools under Linux to write XF86Config for me.

    >>Interfaces ?USB 2.0 x 3*6

    >
    > Works.
    >
    >> ?i.LINK (IEEE 1394) S400 (4 pin) ?S-Video Out connector

    >
    > I wouldn't know about this.
    >
    >> ?ExpressCard?/34 slot

    >
    > No clue.
    >
    >> ?Network (RJ-45) connector (100BASE-TX/10BASE-T)
    >> ?Headphone jack (stereo mini)
    >> ?Microphone jack (stereo mini)
    >> ?Monitor connector (VGA, D-SUB 15 pin)
    >> ?Modular (RJ-11) connector
    >> ?Docking Station connector
    >> ?Memory Stick Duo Slot*7 (MagicGate compatible,
    >> Memory Stick PRO Duo compatible, High-speed
    >> data transfer compatible)

    >
    > No clue, you don't list the protocol (USB?).


    Not sure. There is a multi-card reader/writer that connects to the
    docking station connector, I think, but I can live without it.


    >>Wireless LAN ?Integrated Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g*
    >> ?Intel? PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection

    >
    > See above, about wpi(4).
    >
    >>Bluetooth? standard version 2.0+EDR*9 ?Output: maximum +6dBm ?Frequency:

    >
    >
    > This isn't going to work - bluetooth isn't supported, really. Given the
    > number of problems with the protocol, I'm not sure that is such a bad
    > thing, either. ;-)


    That's okay, from what I've read about (lack of) bluetooth compatibility
    between vendors, I'll have a simpler life without it.

    >>Modem V.92 and V.90 Compliant

    >
    >
    > Unlikely to work - WinModems don't work under pretty much any *NIX, or,
    > in fact, anything other than Windows.


    I expected as much.

    >>PC Card (PCMCIA) Slot Type I/II x 1, CardBus Support

    >
    >
    > Works fine.


    Oh good.

    >>Camera 310,000 pixels effective
    >> Image Device: OmniVision 1/5", VGA CMOS

    >
    > No clue, probably not.


    As I recall, this shows up on the USB bus, so there might be some hope
    for it.


    >>Built-in monaural microphone (front side)
    >>Audio ?DSD compatible high quality sound chip: "Sound Reality"
    >> (Intel? High Definition Audio compatible)
    >> ?3D audio (Direct Sound 3D support)

    >
    > I wouldn't know about this.


    I think the audio is likely to be a stumbling block, though it's not a
    show-stopper. Intel's hdsound is still quite new.

    >>Touchpad

    >
    > Should work.



    >>I tried to boot OpenBSD 3.8 on the Vaio but didn't get very far. A few
    >>screens of unfamiliar messages rolled by and then it all came to a
    >>screaming halt. I suppose I should've written down the last thing that
    >>appeared on the screen but it didn't seem very important since the
    >>obvious next thing to try is to download 3.9 and see if it fares any
    >>better.

    >
    >
    > Actually, upgrading to -current seems to be the way. If you want to have
    > the latest and greatest hardware, -current is probably the way to go -
    > but you do get to keep the pieces.
    >
    > Wait until after the hackathon, though - -current is currently far too
    > unstable. There are some slightly older and mostly functional snapshots
    > on my server at
    > http://jschipper.dynalias.net/pub/Op...snapshots/i386, but you would
    > not be wise to trust some random usenet poster.


    :-)

    > Be aware, though, that running -current does mean that you're expected
    > to be able to solve most smallish problems. In particular, the provided
    > snapshots at http://www.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/i386 should be
    > mostly functional, but the source tree might or might not build at any
    > given moment.
    >
    > If you still have problems, post back with the messages you see. It's
    > usually possible to get troublesome hardware to boot by disabling one or
    > more devices - boot -c enables kernel configuration before boot, and
    > 'verbose' is a very useful command here.


    Thanks for the tips.

    >>I was able to run Damn Small Linux 1.3.1 (I had it lying around and just
    >>thought I'd try it) but it didn't recognise a USB mouse (it did work
    >>with the built-in pointing device). Perhaps DSL needs to be specially
    >>reconfigured to work with an extra pointing device.
    >>
    >>I was able to run Knoppix 4.0.2 on one at the store (just around the
    >>corner (trying to support local business)) but I had to use acpi=off,
    >>noapic and pci=bios in order to do so, or else it only got as far as
    >>loading the cardmgr for PCMCIA before blanking the screen and hanging.
    >>The Knoppix F2 screen says that that's for buggy BIOSes. It's a Phoenix
    >>BIOS, BTW.
    >>
    >>Once Knoppix was up, it recognised the mouse but not my Creative Labs
    >>MuVo TX FM MP3 player as a flash drive. Strange, because the MuVo
    >>appeared okay under DSL on the Vaio. On my home computer, plugging in
    >>the MuVo eventually causes a new icon to pop up in Knoppix. Strange,
    >>because USB was definitely working, or else the mouse wouldn't work. I
    >>couldn't get sound to work under either DSL or Knoppix, though the mixer
    >>seemed to think there was some sort of Intel sound system under Knoppix.
    >>I don't know what DSD sound is, whether Sony's implementation of it is
    >>any good, or whether there are any decent drivers for it. I'm prepared
    >>to live without sound under Linux if that's necessary. Fortunately the
    >>(wired) networking Just Worked(TM), so that's a relief. Also, Nvidia
    >>has recently released Linux drivers that support the Go 7400 and can
    >>suspend, so there's hope for the 3d graphics subsystem, at least under
    >>Linux.
    >>
    >>From what I've done so far, it seems that I should be able to get Linux
    >>working on the thing, sort of, so I'm _probably_ going to go ahead and
    >>buy one with a gig of main memory.
    >>
    >>What I want to know from you people is how well the thing is likely to
    >>work under OpenBSD, and where the pitfalls are likely to be.
    >>
    >>Comments, anyone?

    >
    >
    > If you want to have a slightly less painful way to meet with OpenBSD -
    > which is really nice but does not always support as much devices as
    > Linux[1], especially where laptops are concerned - and really want to do so
    > on a laptop, I'd prefer anything by IBM. The developers are Thinkpad
    > junkies, so Thinkpads in particular tend to be well supported.


    Yeah, I take your point, but the prices for Thinkpads with graphics
    acceleration are far in excess of the price of this Vaio.

    > Which is not to say that you should not be able to get the Intel one
    > working with OpenBSD - most of it should be supported now, and work is
    > definitely underway to add support for the rest - but between running a
    > system you're not really familiar with, the usual troubles with
    > -current, 'testing' some new drivers, and having generally difficult
    > hardware, it might be more trouble than you'd be willing to go through.
    >
    > OTOH, it will teach you a lot about the internals. And it should be
    > possible.


    :-) I think that's the attitude I should take.


    > Joachim
    >
    > [1] This is a bit of a hot topic in OpenBSD land.
    > http://www.undeadly.org and the official OpenBSD site are both
    > campaigning for truly open drivers, instead of Linux' wrappers for
    > binaries provided by vendors.


    Yeah, I read that Stallman nearly got arrested recently at MIT when he
    held a peaceful demonstration at a presentation by some ATI guy. I wish
    I'd been there.

    Thanks, Joachim.



    Regards, Graeme.

  6. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    > Comments, anyone?

    Well, one important thing is the support of acpi.
    If openbsd can't handle it your cpu will power off
    if becoming too hot. Happened to me during an install
    of FreeBSD 6, don't know about OpenBSD but could be
    worser.

    As you have been experimenting with Knoppix, try the
    same with a OpenBSD-LiveCD (based on 3.8 afaik) called
    OliveBSD. The dmesg may be more interesting for you
    than that of a knoppix. (btw, tomorrow is knoppix5 release).

    http://g.paderni.free.fr/olivebsd/

    Greetings,

    MrSun

  7. Re: OpenBSD on Sony Vaio notebook?

    mr. sun wrote:
    >> Comments, anyone?

    >
    > Well, one important thing is the support of acpi.
    > If openbsd can't handle it your cpu will power off
    > if becoming too hot. Happened to me during an install
    > of FreeBSD 6, don't know about OpenBSD but could be
    > worser.
    >
    > As you have been experimenting with Knoppix, try the
    > same with a OpenBSD-LiveCD (based on 3.8 afaik) called
    > OliveBSD. The dmesg may be more interesting for you
    > than that of a knoppix. (btw, tomorrow is knoppix5 release).
    >
    > http://g.paderni.free.fr/olivebsd/
    >
    > Greetings,


    Good advice, if not for the fact that important bit of hardware support
    are only present in -current.

    Work is also seriously underway on an ACPI framework, though it'll be
    quite a while before it is usable.

    Joachim

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