OpenBSD install questions - BSD

This is a discussion on OpenBSD install questions - BSD ; Hi, 1) In the install guide I read the recommendation for 5 partitions. On my 80 GB hdd, I have / (100MB), swap (1000MB = 2 x 500MB RAM) and /usr (the remaining space). Should I indeed have those 5 ...

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  1. OpenBSD install questions

    Hi,

    1) In the install guide I read the recommendation for 5 partitions. On
    my 80 GB hdd, I have / (100MB), swap (1000MB = 2 x 500MB RAM) and /usr
    (the remaining space). Should I indeed have those 5 recommended
    partitions? And is (root) / or /root?

    2) df -k tells me my / = 100MB, and that /usr = 38 GB (during install
    set on 78 GB). fdisk wd0 tells me my disk is 80GB. Is there something wrong?

    3) With the current setup, I tried to install software (MySQL server)
    but it ended with a "disc full" error. What might be the reason? It was
    the first software to be installed...

    Thanks for answers,

    Huub

  2. Re: OpenBSD install questions

    Huub wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > 1) In the install guide I read the recommendation for 5 partitions. On
    > my 80 GB hdd, I have / (100MB), swap (1000MB = 2 x 500MB RAM) and /usr
    > (the remaining space). Should I indeed have those 5 recommended
    > partitions? And is (root) / or /root?


    It is probably better not to deviate from the recommended setup until
    you feel confident doing so, or some daemon mandates it or somesuch
    (many want to have 'nodev' off, so you may wish to put them on separate
    partitions under /var).

    1 GB of swap is very, very much. 2xmemory is a bit outdated, really,
    especially for machines with relatively much memory.

    Root can refer to a lot of things, but if you are talking about the root
    of the filesystem, / is what you want. /root is the home directory of
    the user called 'root'.

    Comments on /usr below.

    > 2) df -k tells me my / = 100MB, and that /usr = 38 GB (during install
    > set on 78 GB). fdisk wd0 tells me my disk is 80GB. Is there something wrong?


    First of all, that's a *huge* partition. What do you plan to do with it?
    It is good to have some space for keeping source trees and compiling new
    stuff, but 38 GB is not going to get filled.

    Also, seeing 78GB of available space on a 80GB disk is not strange -
    first of all, marketing GBs are not real GBs (10^9 vs 2^30), and
    secondly, filesystems and disklabels take some space (though the latter
    is very, very little).

    It is usually better to have unused disk space be unallocated, and to
    have a largish /home if you want to store big stuff (movies, MP3s, ...).

    Also, the total of all mounted partitions should be about equal to the
    size of the disk, provided that the you chose to 'use *all* of wd0 for
    OpenBSD'.

    > 3) With the current setup, I tried to install software (MySQL server)
    > but it ended with a "disc full" error. What might be the reason? It was
    > the first software to be installed...


    Installing software requires space in /tmp, /usr, and /var. Without a
    more explicit error message, it will be hard to tell which one was
    filled.

    I presume you were using packages, not ports?

    Joachim

  3. Re: OpenBSD install questions

    On 2006-03-25, Huub wrote:
    > 1) In the install guide I read the recommendation for 5 partitions. On
    > my 80 GB hdd, I have / (100MB), swap (1000MB = 2 x 500MB RAM) and /usr
    > (the remaining space). Should I indeed have those 5 recommended
    > partitions? And is (root) / or /root?
    >
    > 2) df -k tells me my / = 100MB, and that /usr = 38 GB (during install
    > set on 78 GB). fdisk wd0 tells me my disk is 80GB. Is there something wrong?
    >
    > 3) With the current setup, I tried to install software (MySQL server)
    > but it ended with a "disc full" error. What might be the reason? It was
    > the first software to be installed...


    I'd make the / bigger, just in case. It might come in handy during an
    upgrade snafu or whatever. I make mine 512M, unless disk space is an
    issue in which case I make it 256M. I'd never consider anything smaller
    than that except for very specific applications (e.g. compact flash
    embedded system).

    It's also good to have a big / if you don't use a saparate /tmp
    partition. A real /tmp is probably better though. You can even use an
    mfs device for /tmp to avoid wear and tear on your disk (and it's much
    faster too).

    Your swap is probably going to end up mostly wasted. You can easily cut
    it down to your RAM size + 10% or thereabouts. The only reason you
    might even want that much swap is in case of a crash dump, in which case
    you'll also need enough free space on /var (or / if you don't have a
    separate /var) for the crash dump to get copied safely for archival upon
    the next reboot (i.e. before the swap partition is activated).

    Incidentally mysql puts its databases in /var/mysql, so you'll need lots
    of room there (probably the cause of your "disk full" error). Unless of
    course you feel like symlinking the DB files to another partition.
    That's your call. Keep in mind though that apache lives in /var/www and
    so do its log files. That can take up lots of space too, especially if
    you're hosting many websites. Don't make /var too big though or else
    it'll take forever to fsck... A few GB is probably fine for most
    installations.

    Also don't forget to consider your backup strategy when partitioning.
    What tools are you going to use, what media size, etc.

    Also, fsck needs lots of memory (and time too!) to repair really big
    filesystems.

    --
    Stephen Takacs http://perlguru.net/
    4149 FD56 D078 C988 9027 1EB4 04CC F80F 72CB 09DA

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