Books on BSD source - date relevance? - BSD

This is a discussion on Books on BSD source - date relevance? - BSD ; I have already read "Absolute OpenBSD" and "Building Firewalls with OpenBSD PF" Just picked up "Secure Architectures with OpenBSD." I'm just starting out in using OpenBSD and would like to know as much as I can about the OS internals. ...

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Thread: Books on BSD source - date relevance?

  1. Books on BSD source - date relevance?

    I have already read "Absolute OpenBSD" and "Building Firewalls with
    OpenBSD PF" Just picked up "Secure Architectures with OpenBSD."

    I'm just starting out in using OpenBSD and would like to know as much
    as I can about the OS internals.

    I sat in the bookstore for a few hours the other day and looked at the
    text "The Design and Implementation of the 4.4 BSD Operating System."

    Can anyone give me a ballpark where this text is relevant or in what
    areas the text is similar to or different than the current OS?

    Are there any documents online that are not at openbsd.org regarding
    the current OS that cover the areas where the text falls short in
    assembling an image of what OpenBSD is/does?

    http://www.openbsd.org/books.html
    /quote/ Not 100% applicable, but probably the closest there is to an
    overall system internals manual for OpenBSD. /quote/


    Thanks


  2. Re: Books on BSD source - date relevance?

    Inquiry wrote:

    > I have already read "Absolute OpenBSD" and "Building Firewalls with
    > OpenBSD PF" Just picked up "Secure Architectures with OpenBSD."
    >
    > I'm just starting out in using OpenBSD and would like to know as much
    > as I can about the OS internals.
    >



    There is only one way to know "know as much as you can about the internals"
    and that's to read the code.

    That may sound cynical but it is a fact of life.

    Bear in mind that OBSD gets a new release every six months and it takes a
    minimum of four months to get a book out of the door (and that's from when
    the final document gets delivered to the publisher) - so books are out if
    you want the up to date.

    Almost nobody outside the team seriously looks at more than a small portion
    of OBSD kernel code, so there's not much chance of web published documents
    either.

    Why is it so critical for you to have the latest anyway, are you planning to
    keep up with the changes ?

  3. Re: Books on BSD source - date relevance?

    Thank you for responding.

    I am looking at this as an opportunity for myself. I need to learn
    what I can while able.

    I'm trying to learn several things at the same time. The OpenBSD
    system is great in that all of the code is there to work with...you can
    see it touch it and watch it work. As for an opinion I think that
    studying the OpenBSD operating system ought to be manadatory for all
    computer science, computer engineering and management information
    systems majors in the United States. Just speaking with regard to
    where I am from...given this is a global newsgroup. I would suggest
    that OpenBSD staff pursue opportunities with universities having the
    aforementioned programs.

    It is not enough to be able to speak of what is planned for
    implementation, but to see and implement all through the most basic
    interfaces and to modify the system so that more complex systems can be
    reduced. I am not set on saying that complex technological solutions
    are not great. Those offered by Microsoft for example are also great
    operating systems for managing a large number of desktop systems within
    a LAN...but the multitude and hierarchy of GUI's within an OS when
    studied do not develop within ANY individual that I know of an
    understanding of how operating systems or protocols work and more
    importantly how to understand what may be broke and how to go about
    fixing it.

    OpenBSD is a complex enough operating system, enough so as to be able
    to develop an understanding of all protocols and services that can be
    provided on a LAN or WAN...complex enough to emulate the innerworkings
    of several dozen different devices ranging from switches and routers to
    layers of LAN and WAN systems offering many different communications
    protocols(CARP, encryption, etc). And...this makes it a great
    operating system. The fact that you can get your hands on it and work
    with it to learn is even better.

    The developers have done and do a great job.

    A book similar to the BSD texts already released for OpenBSD would be
    great. If cross referenced with the OReilly or Stevens texts and web
    documentation from the standard of http://www.cert.org, or
    http://www.ietf.org/ even better!

    I would like to know more so that I am both a more effective system
    administrator and dabble in the development of Tcl/TK applications for
    setting up OpenBSD systems more quickly, securely....

    I plan to read the source a little at a time. I am looking for
    information regarding why things work as they do within the OS so as to
    be able to speak intelligently with regard to what I plan to do or am
    having problems with.

    I was thinking of hand tracing, compiling and running small segments of
    the code to see explicitly when it does what.

    There are many documents out on the Internet, but one resource written
    by system engineers as a tutorial would be awesome and take me from
    where I am to a much more capable techie. I'll be buying one of the
    BSD texts this week probably.

    I plan to stay as current as I can for as long as I can. I may devote
    every day for the next six months to this effort so that I come out the
    other end more capable.

    I quit looking for work to study what I like...Unix(Solaris, OpenBSD,
    Linux), MS(Server 2003 and XP Pro), and several languages. I am "raw"
    but working hard. In ~six months I've covered more than once the three
    most recent OpenBSD texts, several OReilly texts on Perl, Effective
    Awk, sed & awk, Prog the Bash shell, as well as the Javascript Bible by
    Goodman, CGI.pm by Stein and am starting in on Tcl/Tk and Expect.
    Should be getting some ActiveState Tcl tools soon.

    I found that when I went to do things I didn't command the skills or
    language to _do_ or concisely frame project (constraints, programming
    languages, filesystem access, overall security) or for that matter
    begin work without a great deal of research. So I dove in. I'm going
    to here be awhile...I've already done the Silicon Valley shuffle
    (2000-2003) and when I go back out plan to "stick" in whatever capacity
    I land so I can move up.

    Thanks for the assistance.


  4. Re: Books on BSD source - date relevance?


  5. Re: Books on BSD source - date relevance?

    "Inquiry" wrote in message
    news:1116985128.484058.324980@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > My very OLD homepage.
    >
    > http://mywebpage.netscape.com/showflash/


    Nice, but perhaps sorting out the typos would help?

    Biker, eh?

    The pea gravel story is scary.

    Steve
    http://www.fivetrees.com



  6. OT Re: Books on BSD source - date relevance?

    Typos... ;-) I'll take a look...there are probbaly too many to deal
    with at the moment. I'm trying to put all my time into OpenBSD and
    Tcl/Tk. I figure when I have something to add to the documentation
    such as a boatload of new OpenBSD skills I'll update it. Untill then I
    am happy hanging out and seeing what you gurus have to say here! I've
    been trolling for at least six months on and off...posting only a few
    times.

    ;-)

    Use to be a biker... Dropped the mighty 2001 GSXR-750 on Highway 9 in
    Northern California. The tires went off(tuned into nothing more than
    an oil soaked carcass) after a day of hard riding and although the bike
    rolled under me 360 degrees(not an endo) in a gravel ditch at less than
    15mph there was over $3k in damage so I sold it. It was in the back of
    the van that I had for about three months but.... Had more pressing
    things at that time too.

    The pea gravel...that was an issue I haven't forgotten. Will not go
    climb any mountains again. I promise!!!! Hehe. I'm getting
    old...thankfully.

    Nice list of hosted clients at: www.fivetrees.com and according to
    Netcraft they are on *BSD too, which is cool!

    Thanks Steve.


    Steve at fivetrees wrote:
    > "Inquiry" wrote in message
    > news:1116985128.484058.324980@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > > My very OLD homepage.
    > >
    > > http://mywebpage.netscape.com/showflash/

    >
    > Nice, but perhaps sorting out the typos would help?
    >
    > Biker, eh?
    >
    > The pea gravel story is scary.
    >
    > Steve
    > http://www.fivetrees.com



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