Setting up a Wiki Server - BSD

This is a discussion on Setting up a Wiki Server - BSD ; Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a wiki server with all needed programs?...the online Ports Collection indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example. -=-=- The World Trade Center ...

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  1. Setting up a Wiki Server

    Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a
    wiki server with all needed programs?...the online Ports Collection
    indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the
    appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example.

    -=-=-
    The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
    at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

  2. Re: Setting up a Wiki Server

    >Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a
    >wiki server with all needed programs?...the online Ports Collection
    >indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the
    >appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example.


    Mediawiki uses Apache, php, and Mysql. Install those three from
    ports, and then Mediawiki is a snap to install.



  3. Re: Setting up a Wiki Server

    On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 17:39:42 -0500, Louis Epstein
    wrote:

    >Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a
    >wiki server with all needed programs?


    No...you actually have to do some research and much **thinking** in
    order to come up with a configuration that will do the job for your
    specific application. Only you can determine what your application
    is. There are many different kinds of wikis intended for many
    different applications. Only you can determine what your requirements
    are.

    Lightweight personal wikis don't need a web server. For example:
    TiddlyWiki: http://tiddlywiki.com/ All you need to know is how to
    right-click on the link given in the download section of this web site
    and select "Save link as..." or "Save target as..." to get your
    instant wiki.

    Some wikis require only a basic web server, while others require a
    full featured, industrial strength web server. There are many kinds
    of web servers to choose from. Only you can determine which web
    server is the right one for your specific application.

    Some wikis require, in addition to a web server, also a database.
    There are many databases. Only you can determine which database is
    the right one for your specific application.

    You start by deciding what kind of wiki you need. The assorted wikis,
    their features, and their requirements are listed here:
    http://www.wikimatrix.org/

    >...the online Ports Collection
    >indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the
    >appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example.


    The Makefile for each specific wiki installs the bits and pieces of
    software required by that specific wiki your already installed web
    server and your already installed database don't have. Only you can
    determine what kind of web server and what kind of database you need
    for the mix of applications you intend to run. The wiki is only one
    application, among many others you might have, that runs on your web
    server and database. Your choice of web server and database may depend
    on these other applications that you run or intend to run on them.

    If all you are looking for is a wiki, then the web server (if
    required) and database (if required) must meet the minimum
    requirements of the wiki you select. Different wikis have different
    requirements, some of them quite specific.



  4. Re: Setting up a Wiki Server

    John L wrote:
    :>Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a
    :>wiki server with all needed programs?...the online Ports Collection
    :>indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the
    :>appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example.
    :
    : Mediawiki uses Apache, php, and Mysql. Install those three from
    : ports, and then Mediawiki is a snap to install.

    So I guess the long list of must-haves is mostly handled installing those.

    -=-=-
    The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
    at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

  5. Re: Setting up a Wiki Server

    Speechless wrote:
    : On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 17:39:42 -0500, Louis Epstein
    : wrote:
    :
    :>Is there a shortcut file (like instant-server) that sets up a
    :>wiki server with all needed programs?
    :
    : No...you actually have to do some research and much **thinking** in
    : order to come up with a configuration that will do the job for your
    : specific application. Only you can determine what your application
    : is. There are many different kinds of wikis intended for many
    : different applications. Only you can determine what your requirements
    : are.
    :
    : Lightweight personal wikis don't need a web server. For example:
    : TiddlyWiki: http://tiddlywiki.com/ All you need to know is how to
    : right-click on the link given in the download section of this web site
    : and select "Save link as..." or "Save target as..." to get your
    : instant wiki.
    :
    : Some wikis require only a basic web server, while others require a
    : full featured, industrial strength web server. There are many kinds
    : of web servers to choose from. Only you can determine which web
    : server is the right one for your specific application.
    :
    : Some wikis require, in addition to a web server, also a database.
    : There are many databases. Only you can determine which database is
    : the right one for your specific application.
    :
    : You start by deciding what kind of wiki you need. The assorted wikis,
    : their features, and their requirements are listed here:
    : http://www.wikimatrix.org/

    Will have to check that out...thanks for the referral...

    :>...the online Ports Collection
    :>indicates additional required files that aren't all there in the
    :>appropriate Makefile for mediawiki,for example.
    :
    : The Makefile for each specific wiki installs the bits and pieces of
    : software required by that specific wiki your already installed web
    : server and your already installed database don't have. Only you can
    : determine what kind of web server and what kind of database you need
    : for the mix of applications you intend to run. The wiki is only one
    : application, among many others you might have, that runs on your web
    : server and database. Your choice of web server and database may depend
    : on these other applications that you run or intend to run on them.
    :
    : If all you are looking for is a wiki, then the web server (if
    : required) and database (if required) must meet the minimum
    : requirements of the wiki you select. Different wikis have different
    : requirements, some of them quite specific.

    I hope the "matrix" advises on these.

    My user-side experience is with mediawiki (having done thousands of
    edits on Wikipedia before getting fed up,and having used some other
    sites that run it since) but if something else is easier it may be
    a better idea.

    On the FBSD side one machine I may use
    is running 4.11 and the other 6.0 and
    they each have ports collections of
    2005 vintage installed...the 6 machine
    has mediawiki as an option and the
    4 machine doesn't.

    -=-=-
    The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
    at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

  6. Re: Setting up a Wiki Server

    On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 21:42:43 -0500, Louis Epstein
    wrote:

    >
    >My user-side experience is with mediawiki (having done thousands of
    >edits on Wikipedia before getting fed up,and having used some other
    >sites that run it since) but if something else is easier it may be
    >a better idea.


    ALL wikis are "easy" to use -- that is the idea behind the whole
    concept -- a wiki hides the details of the HTML from the end user.
    There are some differences in markup language syntax between wikis,
    but ease of use is not the criteria you use to select a wiki.

    You speak as a first person user and seem to be trying to select a
    wiki based on personal experience. You have to remember that wikis
    are intended for group collaboration. If this is for personal use and
    you are the only one who is going to be using it, your life would be
    much less complicated from an administrative point of view if you
    simply set up a web site with a guest book for reader comments.

    mediawiki is the best known out of the 93+ wikis simply because it is
    designed for public use and is used by Wikipedia. As its name
    suggests, it is intended for use by media (news publishing)
    orgainizations that want the general public to participate
    intertactively. It does its job very well in these types of
    applications, but it is not the best choice, if for example, you
    intend to use a wiki to document the operations policies and
    procedures of your corporate data centre.

    In the latter case, you want to select a wiki that does not require a
    database, among other cirteria that is applicable to the data center.
    In this particular example, if your database server farm is down, and
    you need to look up the procedures on how to get your database working
    again, you aren't going to be very successful in doing so with
    mediawiki -- it uses a database...the one that is down. For data
    centre use, you would want to select a wiki that uses text files, so
    that if your web server farm is also down, you can still read your
    HOW-TO documents with a text editor like vi or ee to get things
    working again.

    There are many, many gotchas like this in selecting the "right" wiki
    for your particular application. You really need to do your homework,
    think long and hard about the application, and develop a set of
    requirements and criteria you will use to select a wiki, before you go
    looking for a wiki. In large organizations, mistakes in selecting the
    "wrong" wiki for the application tend to get very expensive very
    quickly -- employee time to re-enter and proof read thousands of pages
    of documentation to correct a wiki selection mistake does not come
    cheap.

    >
    >On the FBSD side one machine I may use
    >is running 4.11 and the other 6.0 and
    >they each have ports collections of
    >2005 vintage installed...the 6 machine
    >has mediawiki as an option and the
    >4 machine doesn't.
    >


    You need to select a wiki that best fits your application rather than
    selecting a wiki because it is the most convenient one at hand. A
    quick glance at FBSD 6.2 shows about a dozen different wikis in the
    ports. Depending on what your application is, you (or your bean
    counter) may find that, in the long run, the cost of setting up a
    dedicated FBSD 6.2 server to run the "right" wiki for your
    application, or even hiring a programmer to port the "right" wiki for
    your application if it is not in the ports collection, may be much
    less than the cost of running the "wrong" wiki on the systems you
    currently have out of convenience, but some bean counters insist on
    learning this lesson the hard way.

    Since wikis are collaborative tools, I suggest that you do some focus
    group type of testing with individuals selected from the potential
    user base to see how the wiki candidates you've narrowed down based on
    technical merits fit into your intended application. There are
    subtilties between wikis that are not readily apparent to those of us
    who are technically oriented. For example, a password is a password,
    but a wiki intended for use in a large organization may have a
    security model that is incongruent with security practises found in
    small organizations, or vice versa.

    Likewise, a wiki designed for use in small organizations, may be more
    suitable for departmental use in a large organization than a wiki
    designed for corporatewide use in a large organization -- it all
    depends upon the intended application.

    Matters like this don't become apparent until potential users of the
    wiki start asking questions about them in focus group settings, where
    one question stimulates a question from someone else, and then another
    and another and the ball gets rolling. You don't want to spend $$$$
    installing a wiki that the users will balk at using for legitimate
    reasons applicable only to that application and that specific
    organization..



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