cron meaning? - BSD

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  1. cron meaning?

    Hello!

    I just doubt the meaning of "cron".
    There is no word "cron" in my dictionary.

    Is "cron" an acronym or not?




  2. Re: cron meaning?

    In our last episode, , the lovely and
    talented sunshout broadcast on comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.misc:

    > Hello!


    > I just doubt the meaning of "cron".
    > There is no word "cron" in my dictionary.


    > Is "cron" an acronym or not?


    It is a name. It means the thing it names. Find out what thing it names
    by using man cron.

    --
    Lars Eighner
    Countdown: 666 days to go.

  3. Re: cron meaning?

    sunshout wrote:
    +---------------
    | I just doubt the meaning of "cron".
    | There is no word "cron" in my dictionary.
    | Is "cron" an acronym or not?
    +---------------

    No, it's a misspelled contraction of "chronology" or
    "chronicle" or some other word related to "Chronos"
    (or "Khronos", or sometimes "Aeon"), the Greek god
    of time. Were everything in Unix somewhat more spelled
    out and daemons consistently suffixed with "d", it might
    have been named "chrond". But they aren't, they aren't,
    and it wasn't.

    There are many, many such (possibly-misspelled) contractions
    in Unix. Legend has it that Dennis & Ken had slow terminals
    and didn't like to type more than absolutely necessary, hence
    "ls" & "pr" & "ed" & "creat" [the system call] & "cron", etc.


    -Rob

    -----
    Rob Warnock
    627 26th Avenue
    San Mateo, CA 94403 (650)572-2607


  4. Re: cron meaning?

    On 03/26/2007 04:09 PM, Rob Warnock wrote:
    > sunshout wrote:
    > +---------------
    > | I just doubt the meaning of "cron".
    > | There is no word "cron" in my dictionary.
    > | Is "cron" an acronym or not?
    > +---------------
    >
    > No, it's a misspelled contraction of "chronology" or
    > "chronicle" or some other word related to "Chronos"
    > (or "Khronos", or sometimes "Aeon"), the Greek god
    > of time. Were everything in Unix somewhat more spelled
    > out and daemons consistently suffixed with "d", it might
    > have been named "chrond". But they aren't, they aren't,
    > and it wasn't.
    >
    > There are many, many such (possibly-misspelled) contractions
    > in Unix. Legend has it that Dennis & Ken had slow terminals
    > and didn't like to type more than absolutely necessary, hence
    > "ls" & "pr" & "ed" & "creat" [the system call] & "cron", etc.


    And arch, ash, awk, fsck, cat, chgrp, chmod, chown, cp, cpio, dd, grep,
    ln, lpr, mv, mt, mkdir, nc, ps, pwd, rm, rmdir, sed, sh, stty, sync and
    tar so on ...; the list is long. Some are acronyms but others are not

    Unix and C were made by programmers and for programmers; better
    s/programmers/geeks/ even better s/prog/real prog/ though all of them
    may not have a real part anyway

    --
    Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Knoppix/FreeBSD/XP
    Home: http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/

  5. Re: cron meaning?

    In article <5lukd4x9if.ln2@news.sebs.org.in>,
    Balwinder S \"bsd\" Dheeman wrote:
    >On 03/26/2007 04:09 PM, Rob Warnock wrote:
    >> sunshout wrote:
    >> +---------------
    >> | I just doubt the meaning of "cron".
    >> | There is no word "cron" in my dictionary.
    >> | Is "cron" an acronym or not?
    >> +---------------
    >>
    >> No, it's a misspelled contraction of "chronology" or
    >> "chronicle" or some other word related to "Chronos"
    >> (or "Khronos", or sometimes "Aeon"), the Greek god
    >> of time. Were everything in Unix somewhat more spelled
    >> out and daemons consistently suffixed with "d", it might
    >> have been named "chrond". But they aren't, they aren't,
    >> and it wasn't.
    >>
    >> There are many, many such (possibly-misspelled) contractions
    >> in Unix. Legend has it that Dennis & Ken had slow terminals
    >> and didn't like to type more than absolutely necessary, hence
    >> "ls" & "pr" & "ed" & "creat" [the system call] & "cron", etc.

    >
    >And arch, ash, awk, fsck, cat, chgrp, chmod, chown, cp, cpio, dd, grep,
    >ln, lpr, mv, mt, mkdir, nc, ps, pwd, rm, rmdir, sed, sh, stty, sync and
    >tar so on ...; the list is long. Some are acronyms but others are not
    >
    >Unix and C were made by programmers and for programmers; better
    >s/programmers/geeks/ even better s/prog/real prog/ though all of them
    >may not have a real part anyway


    And they were originally working on paper TTYs and slow input
    systems, so short names were preferably to longer ones.

    And things like AWK - take the initials of those who wrote it.
    Aho, Kernighan, and Weinberger.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com

  6. Re: cron meaning?

    cron means Cummand Run On

    Also known as a "cron job," a cron is a process or task that runs periodically on a Unix system. Some examples of crons include syncing the time and date via the Internet every ten minutes, sending an e-mail notice once a week, or backing up certain directories every month.

    Crons can be scheduled using the Unix "crontab" command. The jobs are stored in a crontab file and are run by the system at their scheduled times. Or course, if you're not using Unix, you will not need to use a cron, or even know what one is. But, if you've read this far, it certainaly is a good term for impressing your friends.

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