DHCPD and windows client - BSD

This is a discussion on DHCPD and windows client - BSD ; Hie all, I've installed a dhcp server, isc-dhcp3-server on my FBSD 6.2 box. I have configured it as specified i the handbook and it works fine with a freebsd or linux client. but with a Windows client or a Mac ...

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Thread: DHCPD and windows client

  1. DHCPD and windows client

    Hie all,

    I've installed a dhcp server, isc-dhcp3-server on my FBSD 6.2 box.
    I have configured it as specified i the handbook and it works fine with
    a freebsd or linux client.
    but with a Windows client or a Mac client, it does not work..
    i search in the man of dhcpd.conf but nothing about windows or mac...

    here is my dhcpd.conf:

    option domain-name "mydomain.com";
    option domain-name-servers ns1.mydomain.com, ns2.mydomain.com;
    option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;

    default-lease-time 7200;
    max-lease-time 7200;

    authoritative;

    ddns-update-style interim;
    ddns-updates on;

    ignore client-updates;

    subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
    range 192.168.0.10 192.168.0.30;
    option routers ns1.mydomain.com;
    option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
    }

    host joe {
    hardware ethernet 00:17:31:c1:8c:f0;
    fixed-address 192.168.0.11;
    }

    key rndc-key {
    algorithm hmac-md5;
    secret "[...............................]";
    };

    zone mydomain.com. {
    primary 127.0.0.1; # Adresse du serveur de noms primaire
    key rndc-key;
    }

    zone 0.168.192.in-addr.arpa. {
    primary 127.0.0.1; # Adresse du serveur de noms primaire
    key rndc-key;
    }




    Does anyone know how i can fix it?

    Thank in advance

    --
    Mike

  2. Re: DHCPD and windows client

    Begin <4603394a$0$21226$426a74cc@news.free.fr>
    On 2007-03-23, Mike wrote:
    > option domain-name "mydomain.com";


    I hope you used a domain you registered, or one that can't be registered
    and thus cause conflicts. Seeing how mydomain.com is registered by
    dotster, I think that is probably not you. Don't just pick registrable
    domains, please.


    > option domain-name-servers ns1.mydomain.com, ns2.mydomain.com;


    This doesn't work. Use ip addresses.


    > option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;


    Probably better to move that into the subnet declaration.


    [snip]
    > ddns-update-style interim;
    > ddns-updates on;
    > ignore client-updates;


    I'd turn all that off until you get dhcp working. After that you can
    figure out ddns-updates.


    > subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
    > range 192.168.0.10 192.168.0.30;
    > option routers ns1.mydomain.com;


    Better use an IP address here.


    > option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
    > }

    [snip!]
    > Does anyone know how i can fix it?


    The first thing to fix is your question: You only say "it does not work",
    but don't say just what exactly doesn't work. The dhcpd can be made to
    generate logs of what is happening. We need to see the bits pertaining
    to windows clients trying to obtain leases.

    Also, you set your dhcpd to do dns-updates. Since your configuration
    seems to be rather arbitrary I suspect you might not have a dns setup to
    allow for that, or even dns setup at all. I would strongly suggest you
    turn off all dynamic updating first: Setup simple forward and reverse
    zones first, using a .local, or a domain you actually have registered
    yourself. Once that works, you can venture into getting ddns working.


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  3. Re: DHCPD and windows client

    jpd wrote:
    > Begin <4603394a$0$21226$426a74cc@news.free.fr>
    > On 2007-03-23, Mike wrote:
    >> option domain-name "mydomain.com";

    >
    > I hope you used a domain you registered, or one that can't be registered
    > and thus cause conflicts. Seeing how mydomain.com is registered by
    > dotster, I think that is probably not you. Don't just pick registrable
    > domains, please.
    >
    >


    yeah it is for example i gave my domain.

    >> option domain-name-servers ns1.mydomain.com, ns2.mydomain.com;

    >
    > This doesn't work. Use ip addresses.

    ok but i've read that would work but i'll try to change by ip.
    >
    >
    >> option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;

    >
    > Probably better to move that into the subnet declaration.
    >

    ok.
    >
    > [snip]
    >> ddns-update-style interim;
    >> ddns-updates on;
    >> ignore client-updates;

    >
    > I'd turn all that off until you get dhcp working. After that you can
    > figure out ddns-updates.
    >
    >
    >> subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
    >> range 192.168.0.10 192.168.0.30;
    >> option routers ns1.mydomain.com;

    >
    > Better use an IP address here.
    >
    >
    >> option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
    >> }

    > [snip!]
    >> Does anyone know how i can fix it?

    >
    > The first thing to fix is your question: You only say "it does not work",
    > but don't say just what exactly doesn't work. The dhcpd can be made to
    > generate logs of what is happening.

    yes but i dont know how to specify the file for logs.... else if i would
    posted the log
    We need to see the bits pertaining
    > to windows clients trying to obtain leases.
    >
    > Also, you set your dhcpd to do dns-updates. Since your configuration
    > seems to be rather arbitrary I suspect you might not have a dns setup to
    > allow for that, or even dns setup at all.

    i gave dns configured and it works porperly.
    I would strongly suggest you
    > turn off all dynamic updating first: Setup simple forward and reverse
    > zones first, using a .local, or a domain you actually have registered
    > yourself. Once that works, you can venture into getting ddns working.
    >
    >


    thank you

    i'm gonna try it .

    thx.


    --
    Mike

  4. Re: DHCPD and windows client

    [please trim quoted text and preserve its quoting]
    Begin <4606ba69$0$18852$426a34cc@news.free.fr>
    On 2007-03-25, Mike wrote:
    >>> option domain-name-servers ns1.mydomain.com, ns2.mydomain.com;

    >> This doesn't work. Use ip addresses.

    > ok but i've read that would work but i'll try to change by ip.


    You can't tell a machine "use the address you get from looking up this
    name for all your name lookups" and expect it to work.

    If the dhcpd does the looking up before sending the info to the client
    it can work, but I'm not aware isc-dhcp3 does that[1]. At any rate, it
    is usually better to try the simple and obvious things until everything
    works well, and save the fancy stuff for well after that.


    [snip!]
    > yes but i dont know how to specify the file for logs.... else if i would
    > posted the log


    That, frankly, is a clear case of having to RTFM. If some daemon says
    it uses syslog, you have to know how to get syslogd split the logging
    for that daemon into its own file again. You need to read syslogd(8) and
    syslog.conf(5).


    [1] It has been a while since I last set one up. It might, or it might not.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  5. Re: DHCPD and windows client

    After replacing jpd with a small shell script on Sunday 25 Mar 2007 22:39,
    the following appeared on stdout:

    > If the dhcpd does the looking up before sending the info to the client
    > it can work, but I'm not aware isc-dhcp3 does that[1].


    It does, jpd. From le dhcpd.conf man page:

    "option domain-name-servers ns1.isc.invalid, ns2.isc.invalid;

    As you can see in Figure 2, you can specify host addresses in parame-
    ters using their domain names rather than their numeric IP addresses.
    If a given hostname resolves to more than one IP address (for example,
    if that host has two ethernet interfaces), then where possible, both
    addresses are supplied to the client."

    Having said that, the advice is still good. If dhcpd tries a lookup and
    fails to get a satisfactory response, guess what the client is going to get
    for domain-name-servers? Zip, zilch, nada, assuming dhcpd doesn't die. As
    you said, use dotted quad and play with things one at a time until it
    breaks, at which point the OP will have a better clue as to what needs
    doing.
    --
    Radio glossary #12
    Veroboard: A magical substrate for a circuit that will never, ever function
    if built on a real PCB.


  6. Re: DHCPD and windows client

    jpd wrote:
    > [please trim quoted text and preserve its quoting]
    > Begin <4606ba69$0$18852$426a34cc@news.free.fr>
    > On 2007-03-25, Mike wrote:
    >>>> option domain-name-servers ns1.mydomain.com, ns2.mydomain.com;
    >>> This doesn't work. Use ip addresses.

    >> ok but i've read that would work but i'll try to change by ip.

    >
    > You can't tell a machine "use the address you get from looking up this
    > name for all your name lookups" and expect it to work.
    >
    > If the dhcpd does the looking up before sending the info to the client
    > it can work, but I'm not aware isc-dhcp3 does that[1]. At any rate, it
    > is usually better to try the simple and obvious things until everything
    > works well, and save the fancy stuff for well after that.
    >


    It's in the man of dhcpd.conf.

    option domain-name-servers ns1.isc.org, ns2.isc.org;

    Figure 2

    As you can see in Figure 2, you can specify host addresses in
    parameters using their domain names rather than their numeric IP
    addresses.[...]


    >
    > [snip!]
    >> yes but i dont know how to specify the file for logs.... else if i would
    >> posted the log

    >
    > That, frankly, is a clear case of having to RTFM. If some daemon says
    > it uses syslog, you have to know how to get syslogd split the logging
    > for that daemon into its own file again. You need to read syslogd(8) and
    > syslog.conf(5).
    >

    I'm on it.
    >
    > [1] It has been a while since I last set one up. It might, or it might not.
    >

    +

    --
    Mike

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