Blessings - BSD

This is a discussion on Blessings - BSD ; Bless whoever thought of /rescue. Thank you, thank you, thank you! -- Lars Eighner Countdown: 717 days to go....

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Thread: Blessings

  1. Blessings

    Bless whoever thought of /rescue.

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    --
    Lars Eighner
    Countdown: 717 days to go.

  2. Re: Blessings

    On Feb 2, 12:41 pm, Lars Eighner wrote:
    > Bless whoever thought of /rescue.
    >
    > Thank you, thank you, thank you!
    >
    > --
    > Lars Eighner
    > Countdown: 717 days to go.


    What is it ?


  3. Re: Blessings

    Begin <1170442510.264020.77210@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.c om>
    On 2007-02-02, Brent Bolin wrote:
    > On Feb 2, 12:41 pm, Lars Eighner wrote:
    >> Bless whoever thought of /rescue.
    >>
    >> Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    >
    > What is it ?


    Just the thing to make Lars happy.

    If you have a FreeBSD box, you might take a look at what /rescue on that
    system contains.


    Please do trim your posts, BTW. Quoting entire signatures is a bit silly.
    You're supposed to quote only that which is relevant for your posting.
    And to properly attribute that material, of course.


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  4. Re: Blessings

    In our last episode,
    <1170442510.264020.77210@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.c om>,
    the lovely and talented Brent Bolin
    broadcast on comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.misc:

    > On Feb 2, 12:41 pm, Lars Eighner wrote:
    >> Bless whoever thought of /rescue.
    >>
    >> Thank you, thank you, thank you!


    > What is it ?


    See man rescue. Essentially it is a directory full of many utilities also
    found in /bin and /sbin. When castrophe puts you in single user mode and
    /bin/sh will not run, /rescue/sh may. I found that by copying the rescue
    ulities back to /bin there was sufficient stuff to run make buildworld
    and make installworld. So for major disasters of many kinds /rescue may
    work when nothing else does. (If you have occasion to do as I did,
    remember to remove the excess /rescue utils from /bin -- a successful
    installworld will overwrite the utils that belong in /bin -- but you
    must remove the others because they do not quite do everything the
    regular utils do, and you don't want applications to find the wrong one.)

    --
    Lars Eighner
    Countdown: 717 days to go.

  5. Re: Blessings

    After replacing Lars Eighner with a small shell script on Friday 02 February
    2007 19:18, the following appeared on stdout:

    > See man rescue. *Essentially it is a directory full of many utilities also
    > found in /bin and /sbin.


    With one fundamental difference: They're all statically linked, so even if
    you hose your libraries, /rescue can come to your, erm, rescue, which is
    why the shells are in there, too.
    --
    Radio glossary #9
    Mobile: The state in which one drives whilst trying to set the duplex shift
    on a modern radio, usually described as "driving without due care".


  6. Re: Blessings

    In article ,
    Lars Eighner wrote:
    >In our last episode,
    ><1170442510.264020.77210@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.c om>,
    >the lovely and talented Brent Bolin
    >broadcast on comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.misc:
    >
    >> On Feb 2, 12:41 pm, Lars Eighner wrote:
    >>> Bless whoever thought of /rescue.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    >
    >> What is it ?


    >See man rescue. Essentially it is a directory full of many
    >utilities also found in /bin and /sbin. When castrophe puts you
    >in single user mode and /bin/sh will not run, /rescue/sh may. I
    >found that by copying the rescue ulities back to /bin there was
    >sufficient stuff to run make buildworld and make installworld.
    >So for major disasters of many kinds /rescue may work when
    >nothing else does. (If you have occasion to do as I did, remember
    >to remove the excess /rescue utils from /bin -- a successful
    >installworld will overwrite the utils that belong in /bin --
    >but you must remove the others because they do not quite do
    >everything the regular utils do, and you don't want applications
    >to find the wrong one.)


    One alternative is during the time you build the system
    you can place NO_DYNAMICROOT=yes in /etc/make.conf and all
    the files in /bin and /sbin will be built statically. Takes up
    more space but not that drives are of a decent size it's not too
    bad.

    /rescue holds one large file which is linked to 131 names.
    But it is much smaller than having all the separate files
    in /bin and /sbin

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com

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