Building a low-power FreeBSD media server - BSD

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  1. Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    I'm planning on building a home file server for serving media files
    across my home network. I want it to be easily expandable, and am
    planning on using FreeBSD and ZFS to accomplish this. This question is
    really more about hardware. Because the server will be running 24/7,
    and because it won't be doing anything particularly intensive, I want
    it to be as low power as possible. An obvious starting point,
    therefore is a VIA powered mini ITX board. Since it's just a file
    server, all I should need besides that is a bunch of hard drives, and
    a case to hold everything. This is what I've come up with so far, but
    I'd be interested to hear if anyone has any criticisms/suggestions:

    The JetWay J7F5M1G2E-VHE-LF motherboard (VIA C7) will give me a low
    power processor, gigabit ethernet, two SATA ports, 1 PATA port, and a
    PCI expansion slot which will allow me to add 4 more SATA ports. So
    for about $350 plus the cost of a case, power supply, HDDs, and RAM, I
    should be able to put together a pretty low power file server with
    upwards of 6 TB of raw storage. The only real issue remaining is
    finding a case that's big enough to hold 6 HDDs (maybe 7 if I decide
    to use that PATA port for the system drive) and has the mountings for
    a mini ITX mobo.

    Does anyone see any problems or room for improvement with this plan?

  2. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Josh schrieb:
    > I'm planning on building a home file server for serving media files
    > across my home network. I want it to be easily expandable, and am
    > planning on using FreeBSD and ZFS to accomplish this. This question is
    > really more about hardware. Because the server will be running 24/7,
    > and because it won't be doing anything particularly intensive, I want
    > it to be as low power as possible. An obvious starting point,
    > therefore is a VIA powered mini ITX board. Since it's just a file
    > server, all I should need besides that is a bunch of hard drives, and
    > a case to hold everything. This is what I've come up with so far, but
    > I'd be interested to hear if anyone has any criticisms/suggestions:
    >
    > The JetWay J7F5M1G2E-VHE-LF motherboard (VIA C7) will give me a low
    > power processor, gigabit ethernet, two SATA ports, 1 PATA port, and a
    > PCI expansion slot which will allow me to add 4 more SATA ports. So
    > for about $350 plus the cost of a case, power supply, HDDs, and RAM, I
    > should be able to put together a pretty low power file server with
    > upwards of 6 TB of raw storage. The only real issue remaining is
    > finding a case that's big enough to hold 6 HDDs (maybe 7 if I decide
    > to use that PATA port for the system drive) and has the mountings for
    > a mini ITX mobo.
    >
    > Does anyone see any problems or room for improvement with this plan?



    I have no direct experience with FreeBSD and ZFS, but from various
    reports on the mailing-lists, it would seem that
    a) it likes to run on AMD64
    b) it likes a lot of RAM (4GB really seems to be the minimum, the
    solarisinternals.com wiki suggests 1 GB per TB storage.
    Can the above board be fitted with 4 or 8 GB RAM?

    Both is not easily done with low-power VIA-boards, last time I looked.

    Anecdotal reports from other people suggest it's possible to run it in
    low-mem i386 configs - but it needs a lot of tuning and is prone to
    crashing on heavy use.

    I'd either totally scrap the idea of running a TB-fileserver at home or,
    if you can afford the electricity-bill, go with a server-grade
    motherboard (or at least one that can take 8 GB of RAM), fit a LSI SAS
    card into it (or use SUNs OEM model) and buy an external SAS-SATA JBOD
    case specifically for that purpose.
    Promise seem to have released one recently - we currently use MSA70s
    with SAS drives, but they are of course way off the chart for hobbyist-use.

    So, as you can see there are some problems associated with the idea of
    running a low-power ZFS fileserver. Via just doesn't cut it, I'm afraid.



    Rainer

  3. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Rainer Duffner wrote:
    > I have no direct experience with FreeBSD and ZFS, but from various
    > reports on the mailing-lists, it would seem that
    > a) it likes to run on AMD64
    > b) it likes a lot of RAM (4GB really seems to be the minimum, the
    > solarisinternals.com wiki suggests 1 GB per TB storage.
    > Can the above board be fitted with 4 or 8 GB RAM?


    I've so far found ZFS to be stable on FreeBSD 7.0 on x86, once the very
    basic tuning recommendations have been followed. Stability was an issue
    with the earlier snapshots. At this time, I have only 1.5 TB of data on
    the box, 4TB total space, and 2GB of RAM. This will eventually increase
    to 2-3TB of data over the next few weeks. Free memory is presently
    sitting at 1.3GB, and uptime is now approximately 21 days, with regular
    access and a few scrubs.

    What I found with the snapshot I tried (August from memory), was that
    you'd run out of memory after a few days of use, and have to reboot.
    Scrubs would also pick up a lot of CRC errors. These problems have been
    resolved, at least for me.

    AMD64 is definitely preferable, but x86 is quite a workable solution for
    the home environment. I would recommend avoiding VIA, and going for one
    of the new low-power Intel CPUs, with a decent chipset.

    RL

  4. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Josh wrote:
    > I'm planning on building a home file server for serving media files
    > across my home network. I want it to be easily expandable, and am
    > planning on using FreeBSD and ZFS to accomplish this. This question is
    > really more about hardware. Because the server will be running 24/7,
    > and because it won't be doing anything particularly intensive, I want
    > it to be as low power as possible. An obvious starting point,
    > therefore is a VIA powered mini ITX board. Since it's just a file
    > server, all I should need besides that is a bunch of hard drives, and
    > a case to hold everything. This is what I've come up with so far, but
    > I'd be interested to hear if anyone has any criticisms/suggestions:
    >
    > The JetWay J7F5M1G2E-VHE-LF motherboard (VIA C7) will give me a low
    > power processor, gigabit ethernet, two SATA ports, 1 PATA port, and a
    > PCI expansion slot which will allow me to add 4 more SATA ports. So
    > for about $350 plus the cost of a case, power supply, HDDs, and RAM, I
    > should be able to put together a pretty low power file server with
    > upwards of 6 TB of raw storage. The only real issue remaining is
    > finding a case that's big enough to hold 6 HDDs (maybe 7 if I decide
    > to use that PATA port for the system drive) and has the mountings for
    > a mini ITX mobo.
    >
    > Does anyone see any problems or room for improvement with this plan?


    As someone who has done almost this exact thing with FreeBSD, my advice
    is to find a way to be able to power down your hard drives when they
    aren't in use. If you have 6 drives, they pull roughly 10 watts at idle
    (each), so dropping that 60 watts down to <5 watts will save you
    appreciable power - moreso than going the VIA vs. low end Celeron route
    (the CPU, in practice, won't make much difference in terms of power
    pulled, but also remember that the C7 doesn't perform as well Mhz to Mhz
    over the Celerons). Look at the idle power consumption of each CPU.
    Also, make sure FreeBSD can talk to the VIA C7 hardware. The onboard
    ethernet port didn't work at all for me with 7.0.

    The trick is finding a storage controller that will spin the drives down
    due to inactivity. If you can find one, let *ME* know. ;-)

    -->Neil

  5. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 09:27:18 -0700 (PDT), Josh
    wrote:

    >I'm planning on building a home file server for serving media files
    >across my home network. I want it to be easily expandable, and am
    >planning on using FreeBSD and ZFS to accomplish this. This question is
    >really more about hardware. Because the server will be running 24/7,
    >and because it won't be doing anything particularly intensive, I want
    >it to be as low power as possible.


    If by "low power" you mean low power consumption (as opposed to the
    processing capacity of the CPU), then you might want to rethink a few
    things -- nothing beats the zero power consumption of a DVD disk while
    it sits on a shelf, waiting for you to access it.

    ZFS is nice but, the ratio of memory to storage is roughly 1GB of
    memory per TB of storage. For 7TB of storage, I don't think I would
    want to run ZFS on less than 8GB of memory. All that memory takes
    power to run.

    Furthermore, the last set of drives I purchased a week ago, the spec
    sheet claimed a power draw of 13.5 Watts each. Multiply that by 7
    drives, and your server will be anything but low power consumption.

    >An obvious starting point,
    >therefore is a VIA powered mini ITX board. Since it's just a file
    >server, all I should need besides that is a bunch of hard drives, and
    >a case to hold everything. This is what I've come up with so far, but
    >I'd be interested to hear if anyone has any criticisms/suggestions:
    >


    For FreeBSD, unless you are absolutely certain that it will run out of
    the box on the hardware you select, or are willing and able to do the
    programming it takes to make it run, you would be wise select hardware
    from the more mainstream manufacturers:

    Motherboard: ASUS/Intel/Gigabyte
    CPU: AMD/Intel

    I've had problems running FreeBSD on hardware made by manufacturers
    not memtioned above. Obviously, things change and your mileage may
    vary.


    >The JetWay J7F5M1G2E-VHE-LF motherboard (VIA C7) will give me a low
    >power processor, gigabit ethernet, two SATA ports, 1 PATA port, and a
    >PCI expansion slot which will allow me to add 4 more SATA ports. So
    >for about $350 plus the cost of a case, power supply, HDDs, and RAM, I
    >should be able to put together a pretty low power file server with
    >upwards of 6 TB of raw storage.


    I've had good success in building small servers using the following
    hardware:

    Motherboard: ASUS M2NPV-VM
    CPU: AMD/64 Dual Core Athlon 3800+ or higher
    Memory: Buffalo Firestix 2x1GB PC2-6400 DDR2-800
    Drives: 4x1TB gives 2TB RAID1 storage using gmirror(8)

    Note:
    The board claims to support 8GB of memory, but gets tempermental when
    a) More than 2GB of memory is installed
    b) All four memory slots are populated and
    c) Is fussy about the brand of memory you use.

    This kind of quirkiness is not unusual when using a consumer grade
    board in a server application -- its where reality meets marketing
    hype. I suspect that the memory issues in this case are due to the
    amount and quality of power the board is able to supply to the memory
    banks. Two GB in two slots seems to be the limit for reliable
    operation as a server and the rest is marketing hype that might be
    good enough when running that other operating system.

    The reality is that if you want a server with more storage capacity
    than this, and want to run ZFS, you will have to start looking at
    server grade boards that can support the amount of memory you need.

    >The only real issue remaining is
    >finding a case that's big enough to hold 6 HDDs (maybe 7 if I decide
    >to use that PATA port for the system drive) and has the mountings for
    >a mini ITX mobo.


    You have to keep in mind that consumer class computer cases are
    designed to evacuate heat generated by high end video graphics cards
    that may be installed in the case, with little thought given to
    cooling the lone disk drive in the typical consumer system that sits
    in a corner of the case with little air flow.

    In contrast, server class cases are designed to dissipate heat
    generated by high density arrays of disk drives installed in the case.
    If you expect your disk drives to give you any sort of reasonable
    service life after you stuff that many into a case, you would be wise
    to select a case designed for keeping disk drives cool.

    For applications where using a server class case is too expensive for
    the tiny server I might be building, I've had good success in using
    the following drive bay in consumer class computer cases:

    Product Code: KF-3000BK from: http://www.servercase.com/

    The built-in fans keep the disk drives nice and cool.


    >
    >Does anyone see any problems or room for improvement with this plan?



  6. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 11:11:50 UTC, noone@nowhere.com (Speechless) wrote:

    > For FreeBSD, unless you are absolutely certain that it will run out of
    > the box on the hardware you select, or are willing and able to do the
    > programming it takes to make it run, you would be wise select hardware
    > from the more mainstream manufacturers:
    >
    > Motherboard: ASUS/Intel/Gigabyte
    > CPU: AMD/Intel
    >
    > I've had problems running FreeBSD on hardware made by manufacturers
    > not memtioned above. Obviously, things change and your mileage may
    > vary.


    As a data point: I'm running a diskless firewall on a VIA EK (Mini-ITX)
    board, and a file server on another EK board. I also tested with no
    problems on an ML board. All FreeBSD 6.2.

    --
    Bob Eager
    UNIX since v6..
    http://tinyurl.com/2xqr6h


  7. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Bob Eager schrieb:
    > On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 11:11:50 UTC, noone@nowhere.com (Speechless) wrote:
    >
    >> For FreeBSD, unless you are absolutely certain that it will run out of
    >> the box on the hardware you select, or are willing and able to do the
    >> programming it takes to make it run, you would be wise select hardware
    >> from the more mainstream manufacturers:
    >>
    >> Motherboard: ASUS/Intel/Gigabyte
    >> CPU: AMD/Intel
    >>
    >> I've had problems running FreeBSD on hardware made by manufacturers
    >> not memtioned above. Obviously, things change and your mileage may
    >> vary.

    >
    > As a data point: I'm running a diskless firewall on a VIA EK (Mini-ITX)
    > board, and a file server on another EK board. I also tested with no
    > problems on an ML board. All FreeBSD 6.2.



    Yup.
    But no ZFS.
    ZFS - for now - is for the datacenter.
    Unless you go for an array of SSD disks - but you still need the memory.
    If you want to play with ZFS, the best bet would probably to run it
    inside VMware and give it a bunch of 2 or 4 GB virtual disks.
    Or like in that video somewhere on youtube, buy a couple of USB hubs and
    use USB sticks as disks ;-)



    Rainer

  8. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Bob Eager wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 11:11:50 UTC, noone@nowhere.com (Speechless) wrote:
    >
    >> For FreeBSD, unless you are absolutely certain that it will run out of
    >> the box on the hardware you select, or are willing and able to do the
    >> programming it takes to make it run, you would be wise select hardware
    >> from the more mainstream manufacturers:
    >>
    >> Motherboard: ASUS/Intel/Gigabyte
    >> CPU: AMD/Intel
    >>
    >> I've had problems running FreeBSD on hardware made by manufacturers
    >> not memtioned above. Obviously, things change and your mileage may
    >> vary.

    >
    > As a data point: I'm running a diskless firewall on a VIA EK (Mini-ITX)
    > board, and a file server on another EK board. I also tested with no
    > problems on an ML board. All FreeBSD 6.2.
    >


    Likewise: I've got 6.2 running headless on a jetway j7f4 fanless 1.2GHz
    C7 mobo. Some minor issues with the onboard NICs and I admit it won't
    set any speed records :-) but it runs smoothly enough with 1Gb of memory
    as my lan gateway/firewall plus samba server/web server/web proxy/mail
    server/etc (and yes, I know that's a bad mixture of functions!).

  9. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Rainer Duffner wrote:
    .....
    > Yup.
    > But no ZFS.
    > ZFS - for now - is for the datacenter.
    > Unless you go for an array of SSD disks - but you still need the memory.
    > If you want to play with ZFS, the best bet would probably to run it
    > inside VMware and give it a bunch of 2 or 4 GB virtual disks.
    > Or like in that video somewhere on youtube, buy a couple of USB hubs and
    > use USB sticks as disks ;-)


    But they'd wear out. How many write cycles do you get from flash memory
    these days?

  10. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server

    Well, I'm definitely glad I posted this here before just going and
    buying the hardware.

    I don't know why, but it hadn't occurred to me that the HDDs would be
    the biggest power suck in the system. I also hadn't bothered to wonder
    if there would be issues powering down the drives when they're not in
    use (I guess I've been Mac-only for too long...).

    A big part of the reason that I wanted to do this was so that I could
    off-load the various things I run 24h (nothing to processor intensive)
    from my main computer and shut that down at night. It seemed
    reasonable to then move (and expand) my storage to that machine as
    well and use it as a server, but I guess it's not really so
    reasonable.

    I do still need to expand my storage, however, so perhaps I'll just
    repurpose my old gaming box which, fortunately, is AMD 64 and has
    plenty of RAM. Of course I've had no problem with ZFS under FreeBSD
    7.0 running on my MacBook.

  11. Re: Building a low-power FreeBSD media server


    Hi,

    I have found a Via mini-ITX C7 1.5GHz board quite good for low power file
    serving - the one I purchased early 2007 was
    EPIA EX15000G MiniITX M/B 1.5GHz (NEW) A$364

    Reading this thread has just led me to the ataidle port which might make
    overall energy consumption even better - I'll be trying it.

    A thunder storm adjusted my house and zapped all wired network electronics
    in 2007 but my previous server's SATA disks and RocketRAID 1820A survived
    so they were moved to the Via board's only PCI slot (the EPIA board handles
    2 SATA drives while the RocketRAID handles 8 SATA disks). It works fine
    and my intention is to have it battery powered (no wire connections). The
    boot message from FreeBSD-7-CURRENT is below.

    Cheers,
    phillip

    ----------------------------------------

    Copyright (c) 1992-2008 The FreeBSD Project.
    Copyright (c) 1979, 1980, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994
    The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
    FreeBSD is a registered trademark of The FreeBSD Foundation.
    FreeBSD 7.0-STABLE #11: Mon Apr 14 12:02:11 EST 2008
    phillip@xxxxxxxxxxx:/usr/obj/usr/src/sys/GENERIC
    Timecounter "i8254" frequency 1193182 Hz quality 0
    CPU: VIA Esther processor 1500MHz (1499.89-MHz 686-class CPU)
    Origin = "CentaurHauls" Id = 0x6a9 Stepping = 9
    Features=0x87c9baff
    Features2=0x81
    VIA Padlock Features=0x3fcc
    real memory = 938409984 (894 MB)
    avail memory = 904507392 (862 MB)
    ACPI APIC Table:
    ioapic0 irqs 0-23 on motherboard
    kbd1 at kbdmux0
    ath_hal: 0.9.20.3 (AR5210, AR5211, AR5212, RF5111, RF5112, RF2413, RF5413)
    acpi0: on motherboard
    acpi0: [ITHREAD]
    acpi0: Power Button (fixed)
    acpi0: reservation of 0, a0000 (3) failed
    acpi0: reservation of 100000, 37df0000 (3) failed
    Timecounter "ACPI-fast" frequency 3579545 Hz quality 1000
    acpi_timer0: <24-bit timer at 3.579545MHz> port 0x408-0x40b on acpi0
    cpu0: on acpi0
    acpi_perf0: on cpu0
    acpi_button0: on acpi0
    acpi_button1: on acpi0
    pcib0: port 0xcf8-0xcff on acpi0
    pci0: on pcib0
    agp0: on hostb0
    agp0: aperture size is 128M
    pcib1: at device 1.0 on pci0
    pci1: on pcib1
    vgapci0: mem 0xa0000000-0xbfffffff,0xdd000000-0xddffffff irq 16 at device 0.0 on pci1
    atapci0: port 0x1f0-0x1f7,0x3f6,0x170-0x177,0x376,0xfc00-0xfc0f at device 15.0 on pci0
    ata0: on atapci0
    ata0: [ITHREAD]
    ata1: on atapci0
    ata1: [ITHREAD]
    uhci0: port 0xf800-0xf81f irq 20 at device 16.0 on pci0
    uhci0: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    uhci0: [ITHREAD]
    usb0: on uhci0
    usb0: USB revision 1.0
    uhub0: on usb0
    uhub0: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
    uhci1: port 0xf400-0xf41f irq 22 at device 16.1 on pci0
    uhci1: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    uhci1: [ITHREAD]
    usb1: on uhci1
    usb1: USB revision 1.0
    uhub1: on usb1
    uhub1: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
    uhci2: port 0xf000-0xf01f irq 21 at device 16.2 on pci0
    uhci2: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    uhci2: [ITHREAD]
    usb2: on uhci2
    usb2: USB revision 1.0
    uhub2: on usb2
    uhub2: 2 ports with 2 removable, self powered
    ehci0: mem 0xdffff000-0xdffff0ff irq 23 at device 16.4 on pci0
    ehci0: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    ehci0: [ITHREAD]
    usb3: EHCI version 1.0
    usb3: companion controllers, 2 ports each: usb0 usb1 usb2
    usb3: on ehci0
    usb3: USB revision 2.0
    uhub3: on usb3
    uhub3: 6 ports with 6 removable, self powered
    isab0: at device 17.0 on pci0
    isa0: on isab0
    pcib2: at device 19.0 on pci0
    pci2: on pcib2
    pcm0: mem 0xdfefc000-0xdfefffff irq 17 at device 1.0 on pci2
    pcm0: [ITHREAD]
    pcib3: at device 19.1 on pci0
    pci3: on pcib3
    vr0: port 0xcc00-0xccff mem 0xdfcff000-0xdfcff0ff irq 18 at device 8.0 on pci3
    vr0: Quirks: 0x0
    vr0: Revision: 0x8d
    miibus0: on vr0
    ukphy0: PHY 1 on miibus0
    ukphy0: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto
    vr0: Ethernet address: 00:40:63:ec:28:45
    vr0: [ITHREAD]
    fwohci0: port 0xc800-0xc87f mem 0xdfcfe000-0xdfcfe7ff irq 19 at device 9.0 on pci3
    fwohci0: [FILTER]
    fwohci0: OHCI version 1.10 (ROM=1)
    fwohci0: No. of Isochronous channels is 4.
    fwohci0: EUI64 00:40:63:50:00:09:24:ef
    fwohci0: Phy 1394a available S400, 2 ports.
    fwohci0: Link S400, max_rec 2048 bytes.
    firewire0: on fwohci0
    fwe0: on firewire0
    if_fwe0: Fake Ethernet address: 02:40:63:09:24:ef
    fwe0: Ethernet address: 02:40:63:09:24:ef
    fwip0: on firewire0
    fwip0: Firewire address: 00:40:63:50:00:09:24:ef @ 0xfffe00000000, S400, maxrec 2048
    sbp0: on firewire0
    dcons_crom0: on firewire0
    dcons_crom0: bus_addr 0x36c20000
    fwohci0: Initiate bus reset
    fwohci0: BUS reset
    fwohci0: node_id=0xc800ffc0, gen=1, CYCLEMASTER mode
    hptmv0: mem 0xdfc00000-0xdfc7ffff irq 17 at device 15.0 on pci3
    RocketRAID 182x SATA Controller driver Version v1.12
    RR182x [0,6]: channel started successfully
    RR182x [0,7]: channel started successfully
    RR182x: RAID5 write-back enabled
    hptmv0: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    hptmv0: [ITHREAD]
    pmtimer0 on isa0
    orm0: at iomem 0xc0000-0xcffff pnpid ORM0000 on isa0
    atkbdc0: at port 0x60,0x64 on isa0
    atkbd0: irq 1 on atkbdc0
    kbd0 at atkbd0
    atkbd0: [GIANT-LOCKED]
    atkbd0: [ITHREAD]
    ppc0: parallel port not found.
    sc0: at flags 0x100 on isa0
    sc0: VGA <16 virtual consoles, flags=0x300>
    sio0: configured irq 4 not in bitmap of probed irqs 0
    sio0: port may not be enabled
    sio0: configured irq 4 not in bitmap of probed irqs 0
    sio0: port may not be enabled
    sio0 at port 0x3f8-0x3ff irq 4 flags 0x10 on isa0
    sio0: type 8250 or not responding
    sio0: [FILTER]
    sio1: configured irq 3 not in bitmap of probed irqs 0
    sio1: port may not be enabled
    vga0: at port 0x3c0-0x3df iomem 0xa0000-0xbffff on isa0
    uhub4: on uhub1
    uhub4: 3 ports with 2 removable, bus powered
    ukbd0: on uhub4
    kbd2 at ukbd0
    umass0: on uhub4
    Timecounter "TSC" frequency 1499894077 Hz quality 800
    Timecounters tick every 1.000 msec
    firewire0: 1 nodes, maxhop <= 0, cable IRM = 0 (me)
    firewire0: bus manager 0 (me)
    ad2: 76319MB at ata1-master UDMA33
    pcm0:
    pcm0:
    da0 at hptmv0 bus 0 target 0 lun 0
    da0: Fixed Direct Access SCSI-0 device
    da1 at hptmv0 bus 0 target 1 lun 0
    da1: Fixed Direct Access SCSI-0 device
    da2 at umass-sim0 bus 0 target 0 lun 0
    da2: Removable Direct Access SCSI-0 device
    da2: 1.000MB/s transfers
    da2: 495MB (1014784 512 byte sectors: 64H 32S/T 495C)
    GEOM_MIRROR: Device mirror/gm1 launched (2/2).
    Trying to mount root from ufs:/dev/mirror/gm1s1a

    --
    Phillip Musumeci

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