Newbie: first install - BSD

This is a discussion on Newbie: first install - BSD ; Hi! I just installed OpenBSD on my Centrino Notebook. Or, better said, I'm still trying. It was a bit difficult to understand the installation process, but I just don't want to use Vista anymore. I guess I need a new ...

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Thread: Newbie: first install

  1. Newbie: first install

    Hi!
    I just installed OpenBSD on my Centrino Notebook.
    Or, better said, I'm still trying. It was a bit difficult to understand the
    installation process, but I just don't want to use Vista anymore.
    I guess I need a new driver for graphics, as 3D effects seem a bit slow (like
    xscreensaver). This was much better in Windows, though.
    Then, I'd be really happy if anyone could point to where I could download
    drivers for bluetooth, wifi and sound!
    Thanks in advance.
    Steve

  2. Re: Newbie: first install

    bsd wrote:
    > Hi!
    > I just installed OpenBSD on my Centrino Notebook.
    > Or, better said, I'm still trying. It was a bit difficult to understand the
    > installation process, but I just don't want to use Vista anymore.

    _____
    For a good general description of a desktop environment for OpenBSD have
    a look at:
    1) http://www.openbsdsupport.org/OpenBSD-Desktop.html, and
    2) http://www.openbsdsupport.org/obsd_desktop.html.

    I personally favour the default fvwm window manager as it is very fast.
    I use my own configuration file that evolved over some years. KDE is
    a sophisticated desktop, but slower, and has a much larger memory
    footprint. I have used fluxbox as well, and find it very usable. I
    normally install the Rox Filer which works very well indeed. It is
    available as a package (rox-filer-2.2.0p2.tgz for OBSD v 3.9).

    You need to realise that paths to all the programs you need to run are
    being set by the /etc/profile file and the command shell you have chosen
    to use. This can be a bit tricky. A good starting point is the first
    http reference above.

    The X-Windows configuration should work by default for your notebook.
    If not, you need to run the configuration program.

    If you need to use OpenOffice, expect the OBSD version to be a bit slow.
    I get better performance from the Linux version under emulation.

    > I guess I need a new driver for graphics, as 3D effects seem a bit slow (like
    > xscreensaver). This was much better in Windows, though.
    > Then, I'd be really happy if anyone could point to where I could download
    > drivers for bluetooth, wifi and sound!

    _____
    I can't comment on the availability of these graphics drivers since i
    don't use 3D graphics programs.

    I have used OBSD as my main workstation for over 5 years now, having
    switched from Linux RedHat/Fedora. In my case, a workstation with a 1
    GHz CPU, 1 Gb RAM, 30 Gb disk has been quite fine for these five years.
    I do use an OBSD (v3.6) file server that sits in the basement. The
    workstation mounts the necessary directories automatically via the NFS
    file system protocol.

    Programs i use a lot include:
    - firefox
    - thunderbird
    - rox
    - xfig
    - openoffice (linux version)
    - xv
    - gimp
    - vlc
    - TeX/LaTeX
    - ggv
    - amanda
    - lftp
    - gvim
    - xpdf

    It is true that you need to persist and learn how to work with OBSD (or
    any other Unix like OS). The OBSD man pages are very good. Learn to
    use them (xman will help). Most if not all configuration tasks are done
    by editing config files. So, you really need to learn how to use vi
    (vim and gvim are preferred). This is not hard. There are superb
    cheat-sheets on the net that you can put on front of you when learning
    the vi "strokes". Finally, learn to properly use the 3-button actions
    of the mouse for copy and paste tasks in the X-Windows environment. It
    is a very powerful feature.

    Good luck with OBSD.
    --
    Regards / JCH

  3. Re: Newbie: first install

    On Tue, 22 Jan 2008 14:53:08 +0000, bsd wrote:

    > Hi!
    > I just installed OpenBSD on my Centrino Notebook.
    > Or, better said, I'm still trying. It was a bit difficult to understand the
    > installation process, but I just don't want to use Vista anymore.
    > I guess I need a new driver for graphics, as 3D effects seem a bit slow (like
    > xscreensaver). This was much better in Windows, though.
    > Then, I'd be really happy if anyone could point to where I could download
    > drivers for bluetooth, wifi and sound!
    > Thanks in advance.
    > Steve


    Steve,

    Welcome. We were all newbies once.

    First: 3D acceleration.

    There is no 3D hardware accelleration available for X on OpenBSD. OpenBSD
    can make a nice desktop, but ... that capability is not available. Since
    *most* things that use 3D hardware accelleration are Windows games, and
    you won't be playing those on this OS, this lack is usually not that big
    a deal. OpenBSD makes a nice desktop -- it's my favorite -- but it may
    not be for everyone.

    Second: Drivers and other downloadable goodies

    There are no "downloadable drivers" for OpenBSD. All hardware drivers are
    already in the kernel. The only "downloadable" software for this OS are
    the file sets that make up the OS, and 3rd party packages.

    Third: Bluetooth / WiFi / Sound

    Bluetooth is in active development. There are some minimal bluetooth
    drivers in 4.2-release, but probably not enough to make Bluetooth usable.
    Very recent changes in -current have extended bluetooth capability, and
    so you can expect that 4.3-release in April will include mention in the
    -release announcment.

    WiFi is discussed in detail in FAQ 6.13, and you'll also find a list of
    supported chipsets for WiFi in the HCL for your architecture. Some
    chipsets are better than others, due to documentation, or licensing of
    firmware distribution. Note that WPA is *not* currently supported.


    Sound is discussed in detail in FAQ 13.1, and, as above, supported
    chipsets are in your HCL.


    Fourth, but most important: Education:

    Your first educational tool is the OpenBSD FAQ and the other web pages at
    www.openbsd.org (or its nearest mirror to you), which include
    presentations, papers, and additional guides.

    Bookmark the OpenBSD Journal (http://undeadly.org), too. News,
    interviews, and follow-on discussion can be found there.

    Subscribe to the mailing lists. Following misc@ is a great way to learn
    what's of interest, and also how the OpenBSD Community interacts socially
    -- or doesn't. SFOBUG runs an openbsd-newbies@ list which will
    probably also be very helpful.


    --
    Replying directly will get you locally blacklisted.
    Change the address; use my first name in front of the @ if you want to
    communicate privately.


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