Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ? - BSD

This is a discussion on Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ? - BSD ; Judging by online postings, it appears that recent i386 versions of NetBSD have acquired the ability to be installed into a logical partition. Does FreeBSD have a similar capability ? As I suspect that the answer is no, does anyone ...

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Thread: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

  1. Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Judging by online postings, it appears that recent i386 versions of
    NetBSD have acquired the ability to be installed into a logical partition.

    Does FreeBSD have a similar capability ?

    As I suspect that the answer is no, does anyone know if such a capability
    is planned ?

    Thanks for any information,

    Simon.

    --
    Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
    Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

  2. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Begin
    On 20 Nov 2007 06:27:28 -0600,
    Simon Clubley wrote:
    > Judging by online postings, it appears that recent i386 versions of
    > NetBSD have acquired the ability to be installed into a logical partition.
    >
    > Does FreeBSD have a similar capability ?
    >
    > As I suspect that the answer is no, does anyone know if such a capability
    > is planned ?


    IIRC it was never a problem to install FreeBSD in a, uh, slice in an
    extended slice[1]. The showstopper is how to boot from it: The FreeBSD
    boot0 boot manager doesn't support it. It probably never will because
    it simply doesn't have the room to fit all that in one 512-byte sector
    minus the space the primary slice table needs. This restriction is a
    design decision.

    I suppose you could experiment with a different bootloader like grub or
    what-have-you. There are a few alternatives that can load themselves
    from scrounged up free space and subsequently can pack more features.
    Also, a bit of searching indicates further boot1 and boot2 changes may
    be needed. So if you work out how to do it, don't forget to tell us
    about it. :-)


    [1] ``logical partition'' is dos-ese for a partition contained in an
    ``extended partition''. Of course, FreeBSD already had something
    else called partitions, so it calls slices what dos calls partitions.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  3. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    jpd wrote:
    > IIRC it was never a problem to install FreeBSD in a, uh, slice in an
    > extended slice[1]. The showstopper is how to boot from it: The FreeBSD
    > boot0 boot manager doesn't support it. It probably never will because
    > it simply doesn't have the room to fit all that in one 512-byte sector
    > minus the space the primary slice table needs. This restriction is a
    > design decision.


    In fact, you can boot directly the kernel with grub, and then there is
    no problem that it is in a logical partition. The problem is that
    /boot/loader has more knowledge about kernel symbols, modules, etc.
    so it is preferable to boot the kernel with /boot/loader, and this one
    doesn't know logical partitions. The other boot loaders boot1 and boot2
    can be entirely bypassed using grub. Another solution to be able to run
    in a logical partition is to network boot the kernel and then redirect
    it to find its root partition on the logical partition. All this very
    complicated for no big benefit, since if it is only for testing
    purposes, good live cdroms like freesbie exist.


    --

    Michel TALON

  4. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Begin
    On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 15:20:05 +0000 (UTC),
    Michel Talon wrote:
    > jpd wrote:
    >> IIRC it was never a problem to install FreeBSD in a, uh, slice in an
    >> extended slice[1]. The showstopper is how to boot from it:

    [snip!]
    > In fact, you can boot directly the kernel with grub, and then there is
    > no problem that it is in a logical partition.


    I think it is a particularly awkward term vis a vis slices. I'll coin
    ``illogical slice'', for such a great idea they are not.


    [snip]
    > All this very complicated for no big benefit, since if it is only for
    > testing purposes, good live cdroms like freesbie exist.


    There is that.


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  5. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    In article , jpd writes:
    >
    > IIRC it was never a problem to install FreeBSD in a, uh, slice in an
    > extended slice[1]. The showstopper is how to boot from it: The FreeBSD
    > boot0 boot manager doesn't support it. It probably never will because
    > it simply doesn't have the room to fit all that in one 512-byte sector
    > minus the space the primary slice table needs. This restriction is a
    > design decision.
    >


    Thanks for the information. I use grub for booting all the operating
    systems on my machines, so having to use grub to boot a FreeBSD installed
    in an extended slice is not a problem.

    [Although I've been using Linux for a decade or so, I don't have any real
    FreeBSD experience, so the following may just be a lack of experience.]

    Using FreeBSD 6.2, I tried to do a install into an extended slice, but
    there doesn't appear to be an option to specify root as anything other
    than on a primary slice. What am I missing ? :-)

    Thanks for any information,

    Simon.

    --
    Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
    Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

  6. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Begin <1PNWffEXc4Gf@eisner.encompasserve.org>
    On 21 Nov 2007 08:07:54 -0600,
    Simon Clubley wrote:
    > Using FreeBSD 6.2, I tried to do a install into an extended slice, but
    > there doesn't appear to be an option to specify root as anything other
    > than on a primary slice. What am I missing ? :-)


    The part that sysinstall knows boot0 can't deal with illogical slices.
    Nothing to stop you from setting up the partitions, running newfs, then
    untarring the distributions[1] on it yourself. It's a bit of handiwork,
    but not all that difficult. Most can be done through sysinstall, even.

    For a first-time install I would recommend using a primary slice because
    sysinstall and the handbook expect you to. It can be on a secondary
    disk, though.


    [1] Distributions are split gzipped tarballs, so need cat and tar
    to extract, as bsdtar has built-in automatic gunzip support.
    See also the install.sh that comes with each distribution set.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  7. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    In article , jpd writes:
    >
    > For a first-time install I would recommend using a primary slice because
    > sysinstall and the handbook expect you to. It can be on a secondary
    > disk, though.
    >


    This is what I ended up doing (primary slice on a secondary disk) and it
    works just fine using grub as a loader. Thanks for the feedback.

    Simon.

    --
    Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
    Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

  8. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Simon Clubley wrote:
    > Using FreeBSD 6.2, I tried to do a install into an extended slice, but
    > there doesn't appear to be an option to specify root as anything other
    > than on a primary slice. What am I missing ? :-)



    The installer is not able to use logical partitions. It is also not able
    to use a lot of modern useful features, such as installing on mirror
    disks or the like. To do that you unfortunately need to create the
    appropriate "partitions" by hand, run disklabel on them, then newfs,
    and finally run install.sh in the appropriate parts of the install CDROM
    to copy files to hard disk. It is easier than it looks at first sight.

    >
    > Thanks for any information,
    >
    > Simon.
    >


    --

    Michel TALON


  9. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    Simon Clubley wrote:

    > Judging by online postings, it appears that recent i386 versions of
    > NetBSD have acquired the ability to be installed into a logical partition.
    >


    That would be news to me.

    > Does FreeBSD have a similar capability ?
    >


    As far as I know FreeBSD *requires* a primary partition on i386/amd64
    systems, I suppose the first place to look would be the handbook or manual.


    TerryP.

  10. Re: Installing i386 FreeBSD into a logical partition ?

    In article , TerryP writes:
    > Simon Clubley wrote:
    >
    >> Judging by online postings, it appears that recent i386 versions of
    >> NetBSD have acquired the ability to be installed into a logical partition.
    >>

    >
    > That would be news to me.
    >


    Actually, I ended up trying it.

    NetBSD successfully installs into a logical partition, and is bootable
    using Grub in chainloader mode. You do have to make sure that you _don't_
    allow it to install boot blocks/boot menus/boot selectors/etc when
    prompted however.

    Unfortunately, on the system that I tried it on, the ^&*^%& thing went
    and scribbled over the CHS values for all the partitions on the disk
    even though I had taken the precaution of creating the partition beforehand
    and tagging the partition type using Linux fdisk.

    This means that fdisk now thinks that the partitions are no longer aligned.

    Fortunately, I do full system backups before installing any major piece
    of software.

    Simon.

    --
    Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
    Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

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