Tape Drive Settings - BSD

This is a discussion on Tape Drive Settings - BSD ; I came across a Seagate Scorpion STD2401LW tape drive supposedly compatible with Windows, Linux, and UNIX. However, there are dip switches to be set (5-8) to reflect the operating system, and none of the examples in the manual are for ...

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Thread: Tape Drive Settings

  1. Tape Drive Settings

    I came across a Seagate Scorpion STD2401LW tape drive supposedly
    compatible with Windows, Linux, and UNIX. However, there are dip
    switches to be set (5-8) to reflect the operating system, and none of
    the examples in the manual are for OS currently in use. If someone has
    used this drive or a similar one on FreeBSD (preferably a modern
    version, such as 6.2, which I use), I would appreciate advice about
    this.

  2. Re: Tape Drive Settings

    On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 15:58:51 -0800 (PST), tim1948 wrote:
    : I came across a Seagate Scorpion STD2401LW tape drive supposedly
    : compatible with Windows, Linux, and UNIX. However, there are dip
    : switches to be set (5-8) to reflect the operating system, and none of
    : the examples in the manual are for OS currently in use. If someone has
    : used this drive or a similar one on FreeBSD (preferably a modern
    : version, such as 6.2, which I use), I would appreciate advice about
    : this.


    If your SCSI card has a BIOS is it picking up the drive during POST?
    If so is the drive recognized during freebsd's boot? And if so is
    there a /dev/sa# or a /dev/nsa# for it?


  3. Re: Tape Drive Settings

    tim1948 wrote:

    > I came across a Seagate Scorpion STD2401LW tape drive supposedly
    > compatible with Windows, Linux, and UNIX. However, there are dip
    > switches to be set (5-8) to reflect the operating system, and none of
    > the examples in the manual are for OS currently in use. If someone has
    > used this drive or a similar one on FreeBSD (preferably a modern
    > version, such as 6.2, which I use), I would appreciate advice about
    > this.


    Caveat: I haven't used this drive with FreeBSD. But the manual contains the
    following:

    "Note: If the drive is to be used with an OS *other* than those described
    below, these switches should be left in their default positions."

    I would look to see if the controller is recognizing the unit. The only
    switch I'd look at is the wide/narrow to match the controller/cable type.

    As far as the jumpers go, historically the SCSI IDs 0 and 1 were reserved
    for booting, but it doesn't really matter as long as it's not set to 7,
    which is the controller ID. The default is ID 6.

    The problem you are most likely to experience is this unit does not provide
    termination to the SCSI bus so it can *not* be used as the only device or
    at the end of the bus. If you are trying to use it as the only device on a
    bus, use a cable which has more than one connector. Plug the cable to the
    controller on one end and plug the drive up to one of the middle
    connectors, *not* the one on the other end. Find a terminator that fits and
    plug the terminator to the connector on the end of the SCSI cable.


    -Jason


  4. Re: Tape Drive Settings

    Jason Bourne wrote:
    >
    > As far as the jumpers go, historically the SCSI IDs 0 and 1 were reserved
    > for booting, but it doesn't really matter as long as it's not set to 7,
    > which is the controller ID. The default is ID 6.


    Not reserved, but some host adapters may care about booting from
    addresses 0 or 1. It's probably not an issue with a tape drive any
    more, since few people are going to make a bootable tape anyway.

    > The problem you are most likely to experience is this unit does not provide
    > termination to the SCSI bus so it can *not* be used as the only device or
    > at the end of the bus. If you are trying to use it as the only device on a
    > bus, use a cable which has more than one connector. Plug the cable to the
    > controller on one end and plug the drive up to one of the middle
    > connectors, *not* the one on the other end. Find a terminator that fits and
    > plug the terminator to the connector on the end of the SCSI cable.


    There are also the issues of whether the host adapter is terminated or
    provides terminator power. Both ends of the bus need to be terminated.

    Going back to the original question, it would be better to set the
    switches for what is desired than use a rote "set it this way" setting.
    Lacking that, I'd start with either of the manufacturer recommendations
    for Linux or Unix and check the differences.

    --
    Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA

  5. Re: Tape Drive Settings

    Warren Block wrote:

    > Jason Bourne wrote:
    >>
    >> As far as the jumpers go, historically the SCSI IDs 0 and 1 were reserved
    >> for booting, but it doesn't really matter as long as it's not set to 7,
    >> which is the controller ID. The default is ID 6.

    >
    > Not reserved, but some host adapters may care about booting from
    > addresses 0 or 1. It's probably not an issue with a tape drive any
    > more, since few people are going to make a bootable tape anyway.
    >


    The 0/1 thing was very early in the advent of the very first SCSI
    controllers for MS-DOS PCs and it's drivers. Quickly went the way of the
    dinosaur. I always thought it was stupid to hard code the lowest priority
    devices as the boot drives, but that's the way it was at one time (at least
    in the MS-DOS world).

    [snip]
    >
    > There are also the issues of whether the host adapter is terminated or
    > provides terminator power. Both ends of the bus need to be terminated.


    Yes - normally the controller provides terminator power by default because
    it's a "known true". But yes, term. power has to come from at least one
    source. The only reason I can recall for setting it on both ends of a bus
    was if the cable was extremely long out near the range limits. In such a
    case it was supposed to make the bus more stable.

    > Going back to the original question, it would be better to set the
    > switches for what is desired than use a rote "set it this way" setting.
    > Lacking that, I'd start with either of the manufacturer recommendations
    > for Linux or Unix and check the differences.
    >


    Well in this case the 5 Unices specified in the manual generally involved
    patching some system code and rebuilding, rebuilding driver and/or a driver
    database, etc. These include DEC Unix, SunOS 4.1.x or Solaris 2.x, Irix,
    HP-UX, and AIX. Since none of these situations apply the instructions in
    the manual specifically say none of the above = leave at default.

    All else being equal, if everything is setup and config'd properly and it
    still doesn't work the unit has a high probability of being defective. I
    remember sending some of these back to the factory only to have them
    returned "no problem found". Plug 'em up and promptly see it still broken.
    Needless to say we never bought any more of them. :-)

    -Jason


  6. Re: Tape Drive Settings

    Jason Bourne wrote:
    > Warren Block wrote:
    >
    >> Jason Bourne wrote:
    >>>
    >>> As far as the jumpers go, historically the SCSI IDs 0 and 1 were reserved
    >>> for booting, but it doesn't really matter as long as it's not set to 7,
    >>> which is the controller ID. The default is ID 6.

    >>
    >> Not reserved, but some host adapters may care about booting from
    >> addresses 0 or 1. It's probably not an issue with a tape drive any
    >> more, since few people are going to make a bootable tape anyway.
    >>

    >
    > The 0/1 thing was very early in the advent of the very first SCSI
    > controllers for MS-DOS PCs and it's drivers. Quickly went the way of the
    > dinosaur. I always thought it was stupid to hard code the lowest priority
    > devices as the boot drives, but that's the way it was at one time (at least
    > in the MS-DOS world).


    The distinction is that it is a host adapter thing and not something
    built into SCSI.

    >> There are also the issues of whether the host adapter is terminated or
    >> provides terminator power. Both ends of the bus need to be terminated.

    >
    > Yes - normally the controller provides terminator power by default because
    > it's a "known true". But yes, term. power has to come from at least one
    > source. The only reason I can recall for setting it on both ends of a bus
    > was if the cable was extremely long out near the range limits. In such a
    > case it was supposed to make the bus more stable.


    IME, some users would pay great attention to terminating the device end
    of the bus and completely ignore the host adapter. Today, some host
    adapters have automatic termination, but back when I was using SCSI most
    did not. Ten years ago, now, but I still like the examples at the end:

    http://www.wonkity.com/~wblock/SCSI/SCSIExamples.html

    --
    Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA

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