Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets - Aix

This is a discussion on Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets - Aix ; I am writing code for managing a boot server which might be running Linux or Solaris. However, it might have several netboot filesets from which remote machines can network boot into Solaris (sparc or x86) or aix (5.1, 5.2, 5.3). ...

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Thread: Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets

  1. Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets

    I am writing code for managing a boot server which might be running
    Linux or Solaris. However, it might have several netboot filesets from
    which remote machines can network boot into Solaris (sparc or x86) or
    aix (5.1, 5.2, 5.3).

    Given a directory, I need to find out through code whether this is a
    Solaris or AIX, which version and meant to run on which processor. Can
    you please tell me what are the definitive tests for this.

    I need to cross-post this query on a few other forums
    (comp.unix.programmer and comp.unix.solaris) as I need a quick answer.
    Apologies for this.

    -- arindam


  2. Re: Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets


    arindam.mukerjee@gmail.com wrote:
    > I am writing code for managing a boot server which might be running
    > Linux or Solaris. However, it might have several netboot filesets from
    > which remote machines can network boot into Solaris (sparc or x86) or
    > aix (5.1, 5.2, 5.3).


    > Given a directory, I need to find out through code whether this is a
    > Solaris or AIX, which version and meant to run on which processor. Can
    > you please tell me what are the definitive tests for this.


    /usr/bin/uname -s
    AIX

    And depending on your version needs

    /usr/bin/uname -vr
    3 5 (version 5 release 3 in reverse)

    /usr/bin/oslevel -r
    5300-05

    /usr/bin/oslevel -s
    5300-05-03

    Confused a bit on how you intend to boot the AIX image.
    Can you explain further?


  3. Re: Determining the UNIX flavour and version from netboot filesets


    Scottz wrote:
    > arindam.mukerjee@gmail.com wrote:
    > > I am writing code for managing a boot server which might be running
    > > Linux or Solaris. However, it might have several netboot filesets from
    > > which remote machines can network boot into Solaris (sparc or x86) or
    > > aix (5.1, 5.2, 5.3).

    >
    > > Given a directory, I need to find out through code whether this is a
    > > Solaris or AIX, which version and meant to run on which processor. Can
    > > you please tell me what are the definitive tests for this.

    >
    > /usr/bin/uname -s
    > AIX
    >
    > And depending on your version needs
    >
    > /usr/bin/uname -vr
    > 3 5 (version 5 release 3 in reverse)
    >
    > /usr/bin/oslevel -r
    > 5300-05
    >
    > /usr/bin/oslevel -s
    > 5300-05-03
    >
    > Confused a bit on how you intend to boot the AIX image.
    > Can you explain further?


    Yeah sure. I guess my initial post wasn't all that clear. Let us
    suppose I have a Sun or Linux boot server and I have a set of ramfs for
    AIX, SunOS etc. which will be tftp-d to the remote machines. These
    remote boxes can then boot using the ramfs and some bootloader which
    reads from their network interfaces.

    Once I have booted the kernel however, I might need to run a small
    shell and access some basic utilities. I might want at least a small
    read-only file system from which I can do all this. Our filesets
    provide this facility. Once my remote box boots into AIX from the ramfs
    my server provides, the remote machine can NFS-mount this file set from
    my server and run commands. Further, I can put custom executables in
    this fileset - so the remote machine can run some special commands
    which I have provided. So, I don't really boot from this fileset - I
    merely mount it and use it after boot.

    Now that means - on the boot server, this fileset is merely a set of
    files and not a live system on which commands can be run. So I cannot
    run something like uname there. So I was wondering if I could check out
    some filesystem entries or read some config file to be sure that this
    is actually a Solaris fileset or an AIX fileset, of so and so version
    and running on this or that architecture.

    thanks,
    -- arindam


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