high availability vs load balancing - Aix

This is a discussion on high availability vs load balancing - Aix ; Please help me here. High availability and redundancy is not the same as load balancing, right? Load balancing can point to different servers that may very well be configured the same but unless those servers themselves are clustered or have ...

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  1. high availability vs load balancing

    Please help me here. High availability and redundancy is not the same
    as load balancing, right? Load balancing can point to different
    servers that may very well be configured the same but unless those
    servers themselves are clustered or have HACMP or another product that
    makes them redundant or highly available, load balancing is
    technically does not mean the same thing as "high availability" or
    "redundant", right?

    Please help me find a way to explain this to management. They are
    stating that if you have a load balancer, you have redundancy.

  2. Re: high availability vs load balancing

    rstorch1@netzero.net wrote:
    > Please help me here. High availability and redundancy is not the same
    > as load balancing, right? Load balancing can point to different
    > servers that may very well be configured the same but unless those
    > servers themselves are clustered or have HACMP or another product that
    > makes them redundant or highly available, load balancing is
    > technically does not mean the same thing as "high availability" or
    > "redundant", right?
    >
    > Please help me find a way to explain this to management. They are
    > stating that if you have a load balancer, you have redundancy.



    these 2 are easy:
    redundancy: having a ressource available in a more-than-required number
    load-balancing: using redundant ressources in a balancing fashion

    High availability is not as simple to define.
    You will need to ask and answer questions.
    A good start is: What level and quality of service do you want to offer
    to your customers (or have sold them already) and what level of service
    do your suppliers (e.g. electricity, climate, WAN, external data
    sources, hardware tech service) offer to you?

    Then make these match (by using architectural concepts like redundancy)
    and you will end up with a (high) availability concept.

    Good luck
    Joachim

  3. Re: high availability vs load balancing

    Complementing the answer...

    High availability is something that you get when you remove all or
    most of the SPOFs (single points of failure).
    HACMP and load balance are not direct synonym of HA, since a bad
    planned cluster can make no difference, or even make things worse.

    There are lots of great articles about this subject on Internet.
    When the questions are not so specific, like yours, Wikipedia can be
    very straightforward:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_availability
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-availability_cluster
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Load_balancer

    []s Paulo Silvestre Schmitt

    On Oct 29, 6:52*am, Joachim Gann wrote:
    > rstor...@netzero.net wrote:
    > > Please help me here. *High availability and redundancy is not the same
    > > as load balancing, right? *Load balancing can point to different
    > > servers that may very well be configured the same but unless those
    > > servers themselves are clustered or have HACMP or another product that
    > > makes them redundant or highly available, load balancing is
    > > technically does not mean the same thing as "high availability" or
    > > "redundant", right?

    >
    > > Please help me find a way to explain this to management. *They are
    > > stating that if you have a load balancer, you have redundancy.

    >
    > these 2 are easy:
    > redundancy: having a ressource available in a more-than-required number
    > load-balancing: using redundant ressources in a balancing fashion
    >
    > High availability is not as simple to define.
    > You will need to ask and answer questions.
    > A good start is: What level and quality of service do you want to offer
    > to your customers (or have sold them already) and what level of service
    > do your suppliers (e.g. electricity, climate, WAN, external data
    > sources, hardware tech service) offer to you?
    >
    > Then make these match (by using architectural concepts like redundancy)
    > and you will end up with a (high) availability concept.
    >
    > Good luck
    > Joachim



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