strange network behaviour - Aix

This is a discussion on strange network behaviour - Aix ; Hi, on a AIX 5.2 server we have to NIC's. en0 connected to a 10.10.10 and en1 is configured but not connected to 192.168.40 (for a DMZ). Now it is possible to reach a host on the DMZ (192.168.40.10) trough ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: strange network behaviour

  1. strange network behaviour

    Hi, on a AIX 5.2 server we have to NIC's. en0 connected to a 10.10.10
    and en1 is configured but not connected to 192.168.40 (for a DMZ). Now
    it is possible to reach a host on the DMZ (192.168.40.10) trough en0.
    But what is happening, is that when I ftp to host 192.168.40.10
    initially it eventually times out, then I retry on the same command
    line right after the first time I get a connection. I can redo this
    all the time. first time, no connection, CTRL-C it, ESK-K, ENTER and
    there is the FTP prompt again.

    I'am puzzeled about this. Any idea of what could be going on here?


    Thanks.

  2. Re: strange network behaviour

    On 23 Nov., 09:24, relikwie wrote:
    > Hi, on a AIX 5.2 server we have to NIC's. en0 connected to a 10.10.10
    > and en1 is configured but not connected to 192.168.40 (for a DMZ). Now
    > it is possible to reach a host on the DMZ (192.168.40.10) trough en0.
    > But what is happening, is that when I ftp to host 192.168.40.10
    > initially it eventually times out, then I retry on the same command
    > line right after the first time I get a connection. I can redo this
    > all the time. first time, no connection, CTRL-C it, ESK-K, ENTER and
    > there is the FTP prompt again.
    >
    > I'am puzzeled about this. Any idea of what could be going on here?
    >
    > Thanks.


    look at your routing table (netstat -rn). you might have configured
    multiple routes, not all of which are functional. check several times
    with "route get " which route is being taken. AIX networking can
    have multiple routes to the same destination, which it might use
    alternately. Delete the non-functional route.

    Joachim

  3. Re: strange network behaviour

    On Nov 23, 10:54 am, Joachim Gann wrote:
    > On 23 Nov., 09:24, relikwie wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, on a AIX 5.2 server we have to NIC's. en0 connected to a 10.10.10
    > > and en1 is configured but not connected to 192.168.40 (for a DMZ). Now
    > > it is possible to reach a host on the DMZ (192.168.40.10) trough en0.
    > > But what is happening, is that when I ftp to host 192.168.40.10
    > > initially it eventually times out, then I retry on the same command
    > > line right after the first time I get a connection. I can redo this
    > > all the time. first time, no connection, CTRL-C it, ESK-K, ENTER and
    > > there is the FTP prompt again.

    >
    > > I'am puzzeled about this. Any idea of what could be going on here?

    >
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > look at your routing table (netstat -rn). you might have configured
    > multiple routes, not all of which are functional. check several times
    > with "route get " which route is being taken. AIX networking can
    > have multiple routes to the same destination, which it might use
    > alternately. Delete the non-functional route.
    >
    > Joachim


    Joachim,

    what I see with the "route get" command is that it goes trough en0 and
    en1. One time en0 the other time en1.
    I have detached en1 (this is there for a failover from another node,
    so was not connected to a switch)
    and some routes dissapeared from the list. Now all is fine.
    Still a bit odd that AIX goes trough diefferent routes like it is load
    balanicing on NIC's.

    Thanks for the input!


    Regards.






  4. Re: strange network behaviour


    > Still a bit odd that AIX goes trough diefferent routes like it is load
    > balanicing on NIC's.


    It is not at all odd. You have (possibly not by intent but by
    accident) configured it that way. AIX has potentially useful routing
    features, like "dead gateway detection" and the possibility to assign
    costs to routes, so a "cheap" route is preferred to an "expensive" one
    as long the cheap one is up, etc, etc.

    a good intro is here:
    http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infoce...ting_intro.htm

    Regards,
    Joachim

+ Reply to Thread